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Received:  by CIOS Mailer; Friday 17 Jun 1994 23:24:05
Date:         Fri, 17 Jun 1994 17:30:55 -1000
Reply-To: Richard Vincent 
Sender: Communication & international development 
From: Richard Vincent 
Subject:      MacBride Report & Call
X-To:         iamcrnet ,
              Masscomm hotline ,
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To: Multiple recipients of list COMDEV 

Attached is the fairly lengthy final report of the 6th MacBride
Round Table on Communication which met in Honolulu last January. =20
It includes the following:

1.  Summary                                                 page  2

2.  Honolulu Statement (with Appendices)                    page  4

3.  Program of 6th MacBride Round Table                     page 11

4.  Minutes of the Business Meeting                         page 20

5.  Steering Committee Members, with
            contact addresses                               page 24

6.  List of Participants                                    page 26

7.  Statutes                                                page 43

8.  Call for Papers and Participation
            to 7th MacBride Round Table                     page 46


                                 * * * * * * *


Dear colleague:

Attached is the final report of the 6th MacBride Round Table on
Communication which met in Honolulu last January.  As you may
know, the MacBride Round Table is an international group of
scholars, activists, journalists and other communication experts (NGOs,
etc.) devoted to the monitoring of world communication rights and
balances, and reporting findings to community groups, U.N.
agencies, non-governmental organizations and the news media.

The next Round Table meets in Tunis, Tunisia, March 9-11, 1995.=20
Plans are being made to arrange a reasonably-priced air, lodging
and conference package with departure from and return to Paris.=20
The theme of the meeting will be "INTERNATIONAL INFORMATION
SUPERHIGHWAY: Towards a New World Order in Communication?"  The
conference will deal with this and other global communication
issues outside the "Information Superhighway": media empowerment
for Women's and grass roots' organizations, the safety of
journalists in life-threatening spots, and human rights in
communication.

We would appreciate it if you took the time to review the
enclosed material.  It will give you background on the Round
Table's orientation, mission and recent activities.  If you
require additional information, please do not hesitate to write.

I hope to see you in Tunisia!

Best wishes,

Richard C. Vincent
Chair
MacBride Round Table Steering Committee


                                 * * * * * * *


1.  SUMMARY


      HONOLULU, HAWAII (June 15, 1994).  The MacBride Round Table
on Communication now releases the final report of its annual
statement regarding national and international communication
equity.  In its statement, the group urges the United States,
United Kingdom and Singapore governments to take steps to
immediately rejoin UNESCO.

      "We believe it is time that UNESCO should reactivate its
resources, and renew its commitment, towards democratization of
global communication structures," the statement says.  The United
States was the first to withdraw from UNESCO in early 1985. =20

      "The end of the Cold War has not offered a solution to many
of the world's conflicts and political tensions," observes Dr.
Richard Vincent, Chair of the MacBride Round Table and University
of Hawaii communication professor.  "Current world conditions
have not led to a reduction in political tensions both
internationally and within countries.  Fundamental to these
political strains are communication rights and access."  These
were major issues addressed in the 1970s when the UNESCO MacBride
Commission studied world communication conditions.  The
Commission was lead by the late Irish Foreign Minister and head
of Amnesty International, Sean MacBride.

      The Round Table, a communications rights advocacy group,
was created in 1989 to stimulate discussion of issues embodied in
the 1980 UNESCO MacBride Report.  This report was critical of
imbalances in world information flows.

      The MacBride Round Table is an international group of
scholars, activists, journalists and other communication experts
devoted to the monitoring of world communication rights and balances,
and reporting findings to community groups, U.N. agencies,
non-governmental organizations and the news media.  The 1994
statement is based on activities conducted recently at its 6th
annual meeting, held in Honolulu, Hawaii.

      Present at the Pacific meeting were Pekka Tarjanne,
Secretary General of the International Telecommunications Union
(ITU), based in Geneva, and eminent peace scholar, Johan Galtung
of Norway.  Among other participants were Florangel Rosario-
Braid, Director of the Asian Institute of Journalism, Manila;
Henry Muradzikwa, Editor-in-Chief of the Zimbabwe Inter-African
News Agency; Michael Traber, World Association of Christian
Communications, London; Hayden Burgess of the Pacific Asian
Council of Indigenous Peoples, Fran Dieudonne of the Pacific
Islands News Association; Meheroo Jussawalla, communication
economist at the East-West Center, and George Chaplin, former
president of the American Society of Newspaper Editors.  More
than 100 participants from 20 plus countries met to address
issues on the democratization of the world media and
telecommunication systems.

      The MacBride Round Table on Communication reports on
communication equity problems world-wide.  Of particular concern
to the group is the perception of marginalized groups and
societies.  Finnish media scholar Kaarle Nordenstreng heads an
effort to monitor international media performance. =20

      Given the convergence of telecommunication and mass media,
and the future "information superhighways", the ITU and GATT play
an increasingly pivotal role.  Specifically addressed in Honolulu
were the empowerment of women and grassroots' organizations,
rights of indigenous peoples and their cultures and the fairness
of the "information superhighway" proposed by the Clinton
Administration.

      In the Round Table's opinion, the "information superhighway"
should be viewed with caution.  Criticism was directed toward the
Clinton plan's failure to include the world's disadvantaged
groups in the telecommunications superstructure proposal.  The
essence of a democracy is in the ability for all to communicate,
notes peace researcher Galtung.  "How will the information
imbalances found in earlier communication systems be eliminated
this time around?" asks Vincent.

      The Tunisian Secretary of State for information and former
delegate to UNESCO, Mustapha Masmoudi, argues that the Round
Table must take this opportunity to "make communication
technologies the symbol of modernity and democracy," and to
"reinforce the role of the media in the consolidation of human
rights in communication."

      The MacBride Round Table points to the need for greater
equity in information flows within individual countries.  It
urges improved information flow between rich and poor regions of
the world.

      Noting the U.N. Decade of the World's Indigenous People,
the Round Table also recognized the marginalization of indigenous
peoples from communicative links and appealed for dedication of
communication resources' funds.  The group calls upon media
industries and educational institutions for greater commitment to
empower indigenous peoples.

      Within its report, a two percent assessment on world
communication activity is proposed to be spent on improved
communication for indigenous people.  The group further appeals
to world media industries to better reflect the opinions of
indigenous people by increasing their access to media, and for
universities to take a greater responsibility in helping to
insure the education of indigenous peoples, and the preservation
of their languages and cultures.

      The Round Table also declared that in order to meet the
needs for cultural and sociopolitical emancipation, women,
grassroots, and citizen organizations must be ready to seize
their own communication power and develop alternative media.

      The next MacBride Round Table is planned for March 9-11,
1995, in Tunis.  This meeting will further study the means of
access and distribution of the "electronic superhighway," the
safety of journalists on life-threatening assignments, and other
global communication problems.  On one of these issues, Masmoudi
notes that "In three years, over two hundred journalists have
died among their ranks.  Appropriate measures must be decided
upon to face the tragic consequences of extremism and violence
toward the freedom of the press and the future of media."


                                 * * * * * * *


2.  HONOLULU STATEMENT (WITH APPENDICES)
=20

The 6th MacBride Round Table on Communication was held in
Honolulu, Hawaii.  This was an appropriate multicultural and
multilingual setting, a home to "many voices in one world."=20
Honolulu, through the contributions of the East-West Center and
the University of Hawaii, Manoa, also played a major role in the
evolvement of the concept of the Right to Communicate, which was
to become a central pillar of the MacBride Report.

The Round Table meeting lasted for three full days (20-23 January
1994) and much of that time was devoted to the study of
communication equity, both within nations and internationally,
focusing especially on the perspective of marginalized groups and
societies.  In this it followed a tradition established in the
1970s when research played a crucial role in a process leading up
to the formulation of the MacBride Commission's report Many
Voices, One World.  Based on the reflections of more than forty
research papers, several discussion groups and many other
significant interventions, the participants wish to address a
number of issues.


Empowerment of women and grassroots' organizations

Previous Round Tables have referred to the concerns of these
groups of people, and emphasized the need for their cultural and
socio-political emancipation.  The mass media could play an
important role in assisting and publicly legitimizing this
process.  But women, as well as other "minorities" (which in some
places are, if fact, majorities), and grassroots and citizens'
organizations of all kinds, must seize their own communication
power and develop alternative media.  Comparatively inexpensive
technology, like video, on-line computer links and desk top
publishing, can facilitate this development.

One of the main functions of the study of international
communication problems, as summarized in the MacBride report, is
the necessity for an ongoing process of democratization in
society as a whole and the mass media in particular.  This
however, presupposes the active participation of women and
grassroots organizations whose views, contributions, and
aspirations are usually ignored by the mass media, and who are
largely excluded from the socio-political decision making
processes at national and international levels.  No genuine civil
society and no functioning public sphere are possible without the
active participation of all marginalized groups.


Rights of indigenous peoples and their cultures

The Round Table noted the United Nations Declaration of the
International Year (1993) and the Decade (1994-2003) of the
World's Indigenous People.

The Round Table recognized:
      =FEthat the lives, languages and cultures of indigenous
      peoples are at great risk of extinction amidst today's
      revolution in communication technologies;
      =FEthat the indigenous peoples of the world are marginalized
      from communicative links in the world and within countries
      and that therefore they remain at great risk under pressures
      from the state, capital and other groups.

The Round Table accepted favorably the report of the working
group on indigenous peoples.  The working group report appeals
for the dedication of funding from communication resources, and
calls upon media industries, educational institutions and the
MacBride Round Table itself for greater commitment to the support
of programs to enhance the status of indigenous peoples.


'Information superhighway': Efficiency versus equity in
information flows=20

Meeting immediately after the 16th conference of the Pacific
Telecommunications Council, the technological scenario of an
"information superhighway", as proposed by the Clinton
Administration, provided the backdrop for some of the Round
Table's discussions.  While the U.S. National Information
Infrastructure (NII) plans remain substantially unclear, they aim
at creating a more efficient flow of information through
integrated system digital networks (ISDN).  Similar to the
construction of interstate highways under the Eisenhower
Administration, the metaphor of "electronic superhighways"
promises higher volume of communication flows, but not
necessarily greater equity.

Similar "information superhighways" are likely to be constructed
by the European Union, Japan, and other major economies.  The
"information superhighways" will inevitably bypass poorer
regions.  No "information superhighway" is planned for the
developing world, nor are exits or entries likely to be available
to marginalized communities.  Many questions remain.  Who sets
and collects the tolls on the "superhighway"?  Who establishes
the highway code, and polices traffic?  Will there be public
transportation and equal access for all?

It is likely that the new information highways will widen the gap
between the information rich and information poor, both within
individual countries and between rich and poor regions of the
world, to such an extent as to render it unbridgeable in the
foreseeable future.

The Round Table considers the establishment of reliable and
affordable telephone systems, to which ordinary people can have
ready access, as a high priority for developing countries.  The
telephone is also the linchpin for access to most of the new
information technologies such as fax and electronic mail.  The
efforts of the ITU and organizations like PTC to "close the gap"
are greatly appreciated.=20


Dialogue with UNESCO, ITU and GATT

The research papers presented at the Honolulu Round Table amply
demonstrate that the issues addressed by the MacBride Commission
are still there, and that the problems identified in the
Commission=FEs recommendations have barely been addressed, let
alone resolved. On the contrary, many international problems have
compounded themselves and are ever more intractable. =20

Media practitioners and academics are continually reminded of the
unresolved nature of most of these issues. It is no coincidence
that attendance at the annual MacBride Round Table has grown
steadily, with over one hundred people from some twenty countries
attending the Honolulu meeting.

All of this prompted us to reflect on the leadership which UNESCO
once held in the study of global communication problems. Given,
however, the convergence of telecommunication and mass media, and
the future "information superhighways", the ITU and GATT play an
increasingly pivotal role.  We plead for coordination and
consistency in the efforts of all intergovernmental
organizations, and for close and timely consultations with non-
governmental organizations.

We believe it is time that UNESCO should reactivate its
resources, and renew its commitment, towards democratization of
global communication structures.  But, this is only possible if
the U.S., U.K. and Singapore governments rejoin UNESCO.  We urge
these governments to take practical steps as soon as possible
towards full membership in UNESCO.

                                    *  *  *

The next MacBride Round Table will be held March 9-11, 1995 in
Tunis, Tunisia.  The Tunisian Association of Communication
(ATUCOM) will serve as host.  The meeting will examine the means
of access and distribution of an "electronic superhighway" system
and the safety of journalists on life-threatening assignments.=20
In addition, the three Working Groups on Gender, Indigenous
People, and Grassroots' Organizations, established by the Round
Table in Honolulu, will continue their work at the Tunis meeting.


                                 * * * * * * *

APPENDICES:


COMMENTS FROM THE GRASS ROOTS WORKING GROUP.

It was resolved that Grass Roots, in this context, should be
broadly defined to include local organizations and groups active
on the ground, their NGOs as well as trade unions.

In principle, it was felt that the Round Table can act as a
bridge between the academic and research community and the grass
roots/NGO side.  This is in the spirit of MacBride, but is also a
clear need at this time in the communications arena.  The annual
meeting, as well as the aims and constitution, should be
organized in such a manner as to reflect this.  In particular,
the Annual Meeting should put effort into attracting grass-roots
organizations and NGOs, and should ensure that as well as formal
presentation, equal importance is devoted to working and
discussion groups.

A second proposal is that local grass roots organizations are
invited to plan and run a special session of the meetings on
communication issues of relevance to them.  We should also invite
academics that have become very involved in grass roots
activities, and can provide examples of successful
interrelationships between the two.  It was further resolved that
an ad hoc sub-committee be formed to develop a proposal to be
considered at the Seventh MacBride Round Table which outlines
alternative strategies which a MacBride Council could play in
serving to mediate among marginalized communities, academics,
professional communicators, policymakers and NGOs. =20
Such a proposal should include the following:
      1.   Report on alternative organizational strategies
      for such a Council. =20
      2.   Identify key resources (human and financial)
      necessary for such an endeavor. =20
      3.   Identify the central principles which should
      govern Council mediation. =20
      4.   Articulate actionable objectives for both short
      and long term activities. =20

                                     * * *


RECOMMENDATIONS FROM THE INDIGENOUS PEOPLE WORKING GROUP


(Based on the panel presentations, discussants and then the working
group dialogue, moderated by Poka Laenui, and reported by Bev
Keever, Jan. 22 from 8:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m.)


Recommendation 1 -- Dedication of funds for indigenous peoples.

      One of the goals of the International Decade of the World's
Indigenous People should be to dedicate and set aside 2 percent of=20
the world's communications  resources for capacitation building of
indigenous people of the world.  This capacitation building should
include not only education and training, but the provisions of
facilities, equipment and supplies to enable indigenous communities
to become active participants in communication for themselves, to
carry on their ongoing, institutionalized dialogue aimed at joint
problem-solving, a dialogue which is transparent to others in the
society.

      Decisions on the use of these funds shall be made by the
indigenous people in accordance with the spirit of ILO Convention
169.


RECOMMENDATION 2 -- APPEAL TO THE MEDIA INDUSTRIES.

      The media industries providing news, documentaries and other
images throughout the world are called upon throughout this Decade:
      -- to recruit vigorously more persons of  color and of
      indigenous backgrounds;
      -- to give top priority to providing for the educational
      foundations needed for indigenous persons to enter these
      industries and to do so by immediately providing more
      scholarships, mentoring, job opportunities at the entry and
      top-management levels and a better working climate;
      -- to initiate open forums so that the public, especially
      indigenous peoples, are able to better communicate with
      government(s) and with business leaders;
      -- to grant to indigenous peoples more access to newspaper
      space and electronic-media airtime so that their views and
      stories can be presented in their own words.

RECOMMENDATION 3 -- APPEAL TO EDUCATIONAL INSTITUTIONS.

      Because the material and intellectual properties of the
indigenous peoples are a unique cultural heritage of the  world
that has thus far been given insufficient attention and protection,
educational institutions at all levels are called upon to give top
priority throughout this Decade to providing that protection and to
improving the communication-related curricula, financial support
and faculty allocations for indigenous peoples.  As soon as
practical, these institutions are urged to hire persons of
indigenous backgrounds as teachers, faculty and educational
administrators.

RECOMMENDATION 4 -- COMMITMENT OF THE MACBRIDE ROUND TABLE. =20

      The MacBride Round Table itself is called upon to focus its
expertise and energies on the communication-related features of=20
this International Decade and to provide this focus it shall
establish a permanent subcommittee.   During 1994 this permanent
subcommittee, provided adequate resources are obtained, is
assigned:
      --to measure the amount and nature of selected news coverage
      worldwide related to the International Decade of the World's
      Indigenous Peoples and to these peoples generally and
      --to disseminate its findings as soon as practicable to the
      communities of indigenous people, specialized agencies of the
      United Nations, non-governmental groups, human rights
      advocates and to the news media and other interested parties
      and
      --to report its work to the 7th MacBride Round Table.

                                     * * *


RESOLUTIONS AND RECOMMENDATIONS OF GENDER GROUP=20


Recognizing the implicit affinity between traditional concerns of
communications oriented "women's groups" and the clearly stated
value system of the MacBride Commission, and

Taking note of the fact that the communication needs and concerns
of women often run parallel to the concerns of the rest of
humanity, but in the unfortunate sense of parallel tracks, seldom
find opportunity to converge, and

Proceeding from the assumption that the concerns of both the
MacBride Group and Women's Organizations within the global
communications arena would benefit from a meaningful integration of
goals and resources,

BE IT RESOLVED THAT:

1.     The Name of the MacBride Working Group on "Women and
Communication" be changed to "Gender and Communications";

2.     Prevailing MacBride Round Table analytical paradigms be
adapted to assign, within the group's persistent intellectual
agenda, a more central role for those items previously
categorized as "women's issues";

3.     That energy be invested in finding ways to ensure that the
Round Table remain a useful vehicle for the presentation of
research relevant to women as well as men, and to creating a
climate which encourages repeat participation by women at all
levels of Round Table activity;

4.     That both the general membership and the leadership
structures of the Round Table better reflect the stated values of
the MacBride group by pursuing not just multicultural plurality,
but also appropriate and proportionate representation according to
gender, geography and age;

5.     That, accordingly, the steering committee and other
leadership structures of the MacBride Round Table include women in
the same proportion as their presence in the general population
would indicate;

6.     That the annual meeting of the Round Table include a
presentation suggestion devoted specifically to work on
gender-related communication research, especially historical and
theoretical work exploring the relationship between gender and
technology;

7.      That leadership structures adopted by the MacBride group be
inhabited on a rotating basis, and that whenever possible, decision
making within the MacBride Round Table and its constituent groups
will be reached though consensus seeking procedures.

and finally, that

8.      The Round Table reflect on the notion of shifting its
collective focus from intellectualism to activism, where it may be
able to provide theoretical richness for activist/academic
alliances.

These recommendations are offered in light of the MacBride Round
Table's concern with social equity and the protection and
promulgation of diverse world media voices.

                                     * * *

The following changes are suggested by the "Gender and
Communications Group"  for the Round Table at large.

      1.   That the name of the group be changed to "The MacBride
      Council for Communication, Education, and Equity"
      2.   That the mission statement for the organization revolve
      around the following points:

     The Council exists to promote the education, empowerment,
      and communication opportunities of:
     -Women and children especially;
     -Indigenous peoples;
     -Alternative media;
     -The homeless, refugees, and other victims of violence;
     -Grassroots organizations,
     -Environmental and ecological issues.


                                 * * * * * * *


3.  PROGRAM OF THE 6TH MACBRIDE ROUND TABLE



Location:
Sheraton Waikiki Hotel
Honolulu, Hawaii U.S.A.

Dates:
20-23 January 1994


                                  * * * * *=20
            Note:  for copies of papers, please contact
            each author directly.  A forthcoming book
            volume is planned, based on past Round Table
            activities and documents, and selected papers
            from this conference.  A second volume is
            planned for applied papers selected from this
            and other conferences.  For information on
            the first book, contact the principal editor,
            Richard C. Vincent.  For details on the
            second work, contact principal editor, Kaarle
            Nordenstreng.
           =20
            CONTACT INFORMATION:  Richard C. Vincent,
            Associate Professor, Department of
            Communication, 2560 Campus Road, University
            of Hawaii, Manoa, Honolulu, Hi 96822, USA;
            phone: 808-956-3352; fax: 808-956-5591;
            email: rvincent@uhcc.uhunix.hawaii.edu * * *
            from mid-August 1994 to late-July 1995:
            Richard C. Vincent, Fulbright Scholar, School
            of Communications, Dublin City University,
            Dublin 9, IRELAND; email:
            76002551@vax1.dcu.ie; Fax: 351-1-7045447; or
            351-1-8360830; phone: 351-1-7045220

            Kaarle Nordenstreng, Professor, Department of
            Journalism and Mass Communication, University
            of Tampere, P.O.Box 607, 33101 Tampere 10,
            Finland; phone: +358-31-2156292; FAX +358-31-
            2156248; Email: tikano@uta.fi * * * from mid-
            September to December 1994: Visiting
            Professor, School of Journalism & Mass
            Communication, University of Minnesota, 111
            Murphy Hall, 206 Church Street, SE,
            Minneapolis, MN 55455-0418, USA; FAX
            612-626-8251; phone: 612-625-3421

                                   * * * * *


THURSDAY, 20 JANUARY

7:30 p.m.,  Kahuku Room

Welcoming Comments

Richard C. Vincent, Associate Professor, Department of
Communication, University of Hawaii, Manoa

Richard Dubanoski, Dean, College of Social Sciences, University
of Hawaii, Manoa

Ah Jook Ku, Honolulu Community Media Council

Mustapha Masmoudi, Chairman of Institute MASSMEDIA, Tunis,
Tunisia

Kaarle Nordenstreng, Department of Journalism and Mass
Communication, University of Tampere, Finland

Keynote Address

      Johan Galtung, Professor of Peace Studies, University of
      Hawaii, Universitat Witten\Herdecke, European Peace
      University, Universidad de Alicante, "State, Capital and the
      Civil Society: A Problem of Communication"=20


                                     * * *

FRIDAY, 21 JANUARY=20

8:00-9:30 a.m., Kahuku Room

Addressing New Technologies

      Moderator:  Dan Wedemeyer, Chair, Department of
      Communication, University of Hawaii

      Nikhil Sinha, Department of Radio-TV-Film, University of
      Texas at Austin "Information Technology Adoption in
      Developing Countries: Perils and Promises"

      Kerric Harvey, National Center for Communication Studies,
      The George Washington University "Online Outsiders: Social
      Equity Issues in the New Media Environment"

      Gregory R. Viggiano, Department of Communication, Florida
      State University "DBS Signal Spillover and the New World
      Information Order"

      Anthony Pennings, Communication, Victoria University, New
      Zealand "The Information Standard and other Sovereignties:
      New Issues for the NWICO Counter-Economies"

      Discussion Leaders: Dan Wedemeyer, Department of
      Communication, University of Hawaii

9:00-10:30 p.m., Honolulu Room

      Working Group: Round Table Issues

10:00-11:30 a.m., Kahuku Room

Communication in Modern Society

      Moderator:  Thomas W. Cooper, Division of Mass
      Communication, Emerson College, Boston

      Dennis K. Davis, School of Communication, University of
      North Dakota "Media as Public Arena: Reconceptualizing the
      Role of Media for a Post Cold war and Postmodern World"

      Hemant Shah, School of Journalism and Mass Communication,
      University of Wisconsin-Madison "Development Journalism as
      an Emancipatory Social Movement"

      Ramona R. Rush, College of Communications, University of
      Kentucky "Theories and Research to Live By: Communications
      and Information in the 21st Century"

      Oddgeir Tveiten, University of Bergen, "Futures Caught
      between Past and Present: Conceptualizing Social Movement
      Networking in the New Development Communication Research"

      Discussion Leaders:  Thomas W. Cooper, Division of Mass
      Communication, Emerson College, Boston;  Kerric Harvey,
      National Center for Communication Studies, The George
      Washington University=20

1:00-3:15 p.m., Kahuku Room
NWICO Today

      Moderator:  Richard C. Vincent, Department of Communication,
      University of Hawaii

      Miles Jackson, School of Library and Information Studies,
      University of Hawaii "The Status of U.S. Involvement on the
      NWICO Concept"

      Majid Tehranian, Department of Communication, University of
      Hawaii "Where Is the New World Order?  At the End of History
      or Clash of Civilizations?"

      Meheroo Jussawalla, Communication and Journalism, East-West
      Center "NWICO Revisited: Technical Changes Mean that NWICO
      Must Be Rethought" =20

      Wolfgang Kleinwaechter, Leipzig, Germany "After the Cold
      War: The 'New Europe' in the World Communication Order"

      Discussion Panel:  Mustapha Masmoudi, Chairman of Institute
      MASSMEDIA, Tunis, Tunisia;  Kaarle Nordenstreng, Department
      of Journalism and Mass Communication, University of Tampere,
      Finland; Richard C. Vincent, Department of Communication,
      University of Hawaii


3:45- 5:30 p.m., Kahuku Room

NWICO and Communication Flows

      Moderator:  Michael Traber, World Association of Christian
      Communication (WACC), London, UK

      Stanford G. Mukasa, Zimbabwe; Department of Journalism,
      Indiana University of Pennsylvania "NWICO in an African
      Geopolitical and Cultural Setting: A Regional Strategy for
      Democratic Communication and Information Flow"

      A. K. M. Ahsanullah, Bangladesh Nat. Sci. Tech., Dhaka,
      Bangladesh "Appropriate Communication Systems for the
      Development of Rural Community Information Services Towards
      Poverty Alleviation of Developing Countries Like Bangladesh"

      Dwayne Winseck, Department of Communication, Boise State
      University, Idaho "From UNESCO and the ITU to NAFTA and
      GATT: International Trading Regimes in Communication as
      Validation of the U.S., Britain and Singapore's Decisions to
      Withdraw from UNESCO"

      Discussion Leaders:  Majid Tehranian, Department of
      Communication, University of Hawaii;  Florangel Rosario-
      Braid, Director, Asian Institute of Journalism, Manila, the
      Philippines

7:00- 9:00 p.m., Kahuku Room

National Studies and NWICO

      Moderator:  Kaarle Nordenstreng, Department of Journalism
      and Mass Communication, University of Tampere, Finland

      Duane Varan, Department of Communication, University of
      Hawaii "Pacific Voices: Island States and the New World
      Information and Communication Order"

      Rune Ottosen, International Peace Institute, Oslo (PRIO),
      Norway "'Rambo' in Somalia?  A Critical Look at the
      Norwegian Media-Coverage of the UN Operation"

      Suzanna Layton, Department of Journalism, The University of
      Queensland, Brisbane, Australia "All the News That's Fit to
      Print: Politics, Culture and the Press in the Pacific
      Islands"

      Christopher Paterson, Department of Radio-TV-Film,
      University of Texas at Austin "Concentration and Competition
      Among Global Television News Agencies: Implications for
      Coverage of the Developing World"              =20

      Discussion Leaders:  Michael Traber, World Association of
      Christian Communication (WACC), London, UK; Kaarle
      Nordenstreng, Department of Journalism and Mass
      Communication, University of Tampere, Finland


9:00-10:30 p.m., Honolulu Room

      Working Group: Grass Roots Communication


                                     * * *

SATURDAY, 22 January


8:30-10:30 a.m., Kahuku Room
           =20
      Communication and Indigenous Peoples

      Chant:            Keola Lake
               =20
      Moderator:        Lowell Frazier, Chair, Department of
      Journalism, University of Hawaii

      Crystella Kauka, William S. Richardson School of Law
      Library, University of Hawaii, "Examining the News Coverage
      of Indigenous Peoples, Explaining the Indknow Network"

      Poka Laenui, Director, Institute for the Advancement of
      Hawaiian Affairs, "Is there an Indigenous Seat at the
      Communication Luau?"

      Beverly Keever, Department of Journalism, University of
      Hawaii, "The Historical Roots of Cultural Bias: A Cross-
      Disciplinary Analysis"

      Donald Topping, Director, Social Science Research Institute,
      University of Hawaii, "Implications of Old Theories for the
      New Millennium and a Tinier Planet"


      Discussion Leaders:

      George Chaplin, editor-in-chief of The Honolulu Advertiser
      (1959-86); 1977-78 president of the American Society of
      Newspaper Editors; current member of the American board of
      International Press Institute, Honolulu

      Fran Dieudonne, Pan Pacific and Southeast Asia Women's
      Association and Pacific Islands News Association, Honolulu

      Desmond Byrne, Chair of the Honolulu-Community Media Council
      and owner of Honolulu Information Service, Honolulu

      Lurline McGregor, Executive Director, Pacific Islanders in
      Communications, Hawaii

      Rich Somerville, Editor of Honolulu Advertiser's Aloha Aina;
      Former Assistant Managing Editor, Honolulu Star-Bulletin;
      1985 Jefferson Fellow at East-West Center, Honolulu

                                     * * *

      CHANT:

             A TRADITION OF OUR KUPUNA                          =20
                                                                 =20
     =20
      The custom of asking for entry or asking permission to
      use or remove or alter in any way, that which is sacred
      to anyone or to life around you, is intrinsically
      Hawaiian and an essential part of our culture, and
      required knowledge for every Native Hawaiian.          =20
                           =20
                                                                 =20
     =20
            PRAYER ASKING TO ENTER                               =20
                                                                 =20
      =20
                  LI'U LI'U ALOHA IA'U                              =20
                  Long have I tarried with love                     =20
                             =20
                                                                 =20
      =20
                  KA UKA O KOHOLA-LELE                              =20
                  in the uplands of kohola-lele                     =20
                             =20
                                                                 =20
      =20
                  KA NAHELE MAUKA O KA PAPALA LA.                  =20
                  the wildwood above Ka papala.                     =20
                                                                    =20
                             =20
                  KOMO, E KOMO AKU HOI AU MALOKO,                =20
                  To enter, permit me to enter, I pray              =20
                                                                =20

                  MAI HO'OHEWAHEWA MAI OE LA'U;                     =20
                  Refuse me not recognition; I am he                =20
                                                                    =20
                               =20
                  OWAU NO IA, HE LEO E-E                            =20
                  A traveler offering myriad of praise              =20
                                                                    =20
                                =20
                  A HE LEO WALE NO, E-E                             =20
                  Just a voice                                      =20
                             =20
                                                                        =20
                  MALOKO AKU AU, E KEALOHALANI E-E.               =20
                  Let me come in to you, O heavenly Chief.          =20
                           =20

           ANSWER                                                 =20
                                                                 =20
       =20
                  ALOHA NA HALE O MAKOU I MAKAMAKA OLE
                  What love to our now vacant                      =20
                                                                 =20
        =20
                  KE ALA NUI HELE MAUKA OPU'U KAHEA LA E-E
                  As one climbs the mount of entreaty               =20

                                                             =20
                  KA HE-A                                           =20
                  we call                                           =20

                        =20
                  E KAHEA AKU KA PONO E KOMO MAI OE ILOKO NEI    =20
                  We voice the welcome, invite you to enter      =20
        =20

                  EIA KA PU'U NUI O WAHO NEI, HE ANU.               =20
                  The hill of affliction out there is the cold.     =20

                 =20
                  UA AO KA HALE NEI, UA HIKI MAI IA OE              =20
                  Our house is lighted, because you are here        =20

                                    =20
                  HE MAI HELE MAI                  =20
                  Come, welcome,                                 =20


                  EIA NO MAKOU NEI                                  =20
                  We are here                                       =20
                                    =20
                                     * * *

10:30 a.m.-12:00 noon, Kahuku and Honolulu Rooms

Working Groups:         Indigenous People
                        General Issues

1:30- 2:45 p.m., Kahuku Room

Media and International Affairs

      Moderator: Dennis K. Davis, School of Communication,
      University of North Dakota

      Catherine Van Horn, Communication Studies, The University of
      Northern Iowa "Communication Flow Images and Issues on the
      19th-Century Fijian Frontier"

      Michael Griffin, School of Journalism and Mass
      Communication, University of Minnesota; and Simon Kagan, Tel
      Aviv University, Israel "CNN and National Broadcasting in
      Israel During the Gulf War"

      Louis Leung, Department of Communication, University of
      Hawaii "U.S. Newspaper Headlines in International News: A
      Look at Readability, Accuracy, and Sensationalism."

      Kaarle Nordenstreng, Department of Journalism and Mass
      Communication, University of Tampere, Finland  "Monitoring
      Media Performance: An International Program for Content
      Analysis and Media Criticism" =20

      Discussion Leaders:  Dennis K. Davis, School of
      Communication, University of North Dakota; Sean O Slochru,
      Nexus Europe, Dublin, Ireland=20


3:00-4:30 p.m., Kahuku Room

NWICO Issues in the World Today
=20
      Moderator:  Duane Varan, Department of Communication,
      University of Hawaii

      George Kent, Department of Political Science, University of
      Hawaii "Communicating Nutrition and Other Rights"
     =20
      Sunny Yoon, Sungyan Kwan University, Seoul, Korea "The Web
      of Power in the World Information Flow:  The Discourse of
      Free Trade and Information
     =20
      Jeffrey C. Ady, Department of Communication, University of
      Hawaii "Cultural Relativism and Global Equity in Media
      Access: A Challenge to Idealism through the 1990s"

      Michael Basil, Department of Speech, University of Hawaii
      "Unresearched Assumptions in the MacBride Report"

      Discussion Leaders:  Duane Varan, Department of
      Communication, University of Hawaii;  Henry E. Muradzikwa,
      Editor-in-Chief, Zimbabwe Inter-Africa News Agency

=20
3:30-5:00 p.m., Honolulu Room

Working Group:  Gender and Communication

7:00-9:00 p.m., Kahuku Room

Working Group:  Defining NWICO as a Concept

                                     * * *

SUNDAY, 23 JANUARY

8:00-9:30 a.m., Kahuku Room

Media and New Technologies in an International Setting

      Moderator:  Anthony Pennings, Communication, Victoria
      University, New Zealand

      Michael Sysiuk, Department of Political Science, University
      of Hawaii "Media Freedom: The Implications for Hong Kong and
      1997"

      Dineh Davis, Department of Communication, University of
      Hawaii, "Gendered Applications of Telecommunication
      Technologies: Empowerment or Entrenchment?"

      K. Dean Stephens, The Vanguard Trust, Hawaii, "The Brave New
      World of Multimedia"

      Michael Ogden, Department of Political Science, University
      of Hawaii "Politics in a Parallel Universe: Is There a
      Future for CyberDemocracy?"=20

      Discussion Leaders:  Anthony Pennings, Communication,
      Victoria  University, New Zealand;  Louis Leung, Department
      of Communication, University of Hawaii=20



10:00-11:30 a.m., Honolulu Room

      Working Group: Round Table Steering Committee

10:00-11:30 a.m., Kahuku Room

Theoretical and Pedagogical Concerns in Communication

      Moderator:  Dineh Davis, Department of Communication,
      University of Hawaii

      Igor E. Klyukanov, Department of Communication Studies,
      Eastern Washington University "The Concept of 'Communicative
      Democracy' and the Flow of Information"

      David Schuelke, Department of Rhetoric, University of
      Minnesota, Twin Cities "The Implications of Freire's
      Theories of Liberation Education on the Teaching of
      Communication"

      Mashoed Bailie, Department of Communication, University of
      Wisconsin, Oshkosh "Toward a Critical Pedagogy for
      Communication Education: In the Classroom in the World"

      Jay M. Heffron, Dept. of Educational Foundations, University
      of Hawaii, "Toward a Cybernetic Pedagogy: The Cognitive
      Revolution and the Classroom, 1948-Present"

      Discussion Leaders:  Dineh Davis, Department of
      Communication, University of Hawaii;  Stanford G. Mukasa,
      Department of Journalism, Indiana University of Pennsylvania=20
     =20


1:00-4:30 p.m., Honolulu Room

=09Annual Round Table Business Meeting


                                 * * * * * * *


4.  MINUTES OF THE BUSINESS MEETING



The business meeting was held on Sunday, 23 January in the
Sheraton Waikiki Hotel Honolulu Room.  The meeting was attended
by some 30 Round Table participants.

Meeting was chaired by Richard C. Vincent.  Minutes were prepared
by Se=A0n O Siochr=A3 and Richard C. Vincent.


1.)  Report of the Working Groups

The Indigenous People's Working Group reported.  The meeting
agreed to add the following to the Statement:

The MacBride Round Table received favorably the report of the
Indigenous People's Working Group, and applauds any efforts to
improve the communication rights of indigenous people, in which
it was recommended that 2 percent of the world's communications
resources be set aside and dedicated for capacitation building of
indigenous people of the world.  The full report is appended as
Annex to the Statement.

It was agreed that a sub-group comprising one person from each
working group and Michael Traber meet directly after the main
meeting, to attend to changes to the statement that will reflect
the above, and other key concerns raised during the working
groups.

The Women and Communication Working Group reported.  It was noted
that it was renamed the Gender Working Group.  The report was
received favorably and is included an Annex to the Statement .=20

The Grass Roots report was also received favorably, and is added
as an Annex to the Statement.  It was noted that the term Task
Force could be changed to ad hoc sub committee.=20


2.)  The Honolulu Statement

A draft statement, prepared by Michael Traber (UK), was presented
to the group.

A number of substantive issues were raised and a drafting
subcommittee deal was delegated to deal with the detail after the
meeting. =20


3.)  Future of Round Table

a.  Future Aims

A modest and realistic approach was advocated, comprising of 1)
the annual meeting, 2) formal publications such as a newsletter
and possibly books, 3) conducting a larger study after a period
of time ("Revisiting the MacBride Report..."), possibly rewriting
the MacBride Report from a new technology perspective and in a
political context, 4) strive for a representative sample of world
population in Round Table membership, 5) conduct a monitoring
project--a global watchdog of media performance.

b.  Activities

It was discussed how the annual statement should offer a
resolution or declaration.  Some possibilities were that each
annual statement might reference to some main tendencies of the
last year; the Round Table, through the annual statement, might
serve as a societal "watchdog,"  and each annual statement might
offer recommendations for the improvement of world communication.

It was also recommended that the Steering Committee prepare a
statement in advance of the business meeting.  In the future, the
annual meeting should be structured in three parts:  1) academic,
2) working groups, and 3) the business meeting, just as it was
this year.


4.)  Legal Matters and Statutes

The statutes draft offered to the 6th Round Table was accepted in
principle.  It was agreed that the Steering Committee would
continue to work on a final draft of the statutes, in cooperation
with legal council (Peter Franck).
 =20
It was agreed that each Round Table should produce an annual
statement of approximately 3 to 4 pages, and publish a more
substantial annual report.

Sentiment was expressed for charging no membership fees at this
time, but instead assessing an attendance fee for participation
in each Round Table meeting.  It was also recommended that
additional fund raising be carried out by the Steering Committee.

Some argued for an open membership policy for the Round Table.=20
It also was suggested that the role of the Steering Committee
should be one of coordination, and serving as a resource for the
sponsorship of the annual meeting and the annual report.

Some also called on voluntary sponsorships, with annual
contributions being solicited from institutional members.  The
matter was advised to the Steering Committee for further
analysis.

Consensus was that the Round Table should seek to establish
itself as a nonprofit organization.  Potential sites were
discussed including Dublin, Honolulu and Geneva.  Sentiment was
expressed for choosing Dublin as the founding site, given that
Ireland was the home country of Sean MacBride.  The notion of a
secretariat in one or more locations was also discussed.  The
notion of regional centers versus one center was discussed.  Site
proposals will be discussed at the next meeting, and may be
discussed by the Steering Committee throughout the year. =20

The question of changing the name of the MacBride Round Table was
discussed based on a proposal made by the Gender Group.  Strong
sentiment was expressed for the traditions the MacBride name lent
to the organization.  It was decided that the Steering Committee
would further explore this proposal for the next meeting and
might possibly offer alternate proposals.

5.)  Steering Committee and Permanent Working Groups

a.  Permanent Working Groups Structure and Composition

Consensus was that three permanent working groups, first
implemented in this Round Table meeting should now be made
permanent.  The Round Table agreed that coordinators would be
selected.  Chosen as the initial working group coordinators were:=20
Suzanna Layton of the Department of Journalism, The University of
Queensland, Brisbane, Australia for the Gender Group leadership;
Hayden Burgess (Poka Laenui), Director, Institute for the
Advancement of Hawaiian Affairs; and Crystella Kauka of the
William S. Richardson School of Law Library, University of Hawaii
for the Indigenous Peoples Group; and Dwane Varan of the
Department of Communication, University of Hawaii for the Grass
Roots Group.

b.  Steering Committee Structure and Composition

Based on the proposal to create term lengths for Steering
Committee membership, it was agreed that there would be one chair
and two vice-chairs, and six members at large.  To insure a
rotation the group agreed that the current Round Table organizer
would continue as chair for the following year.  It was further
agreed that the two vice-chairs would be occupied by the both the
next and previous Round Table site coordinators or a
representative.  It was further agreed that the six at large
steering committee members would be initially selected as
follows:  two for one year, two for two years, and two for three
years.    =20

The current Steering Committee is therefore constructed as
follows:  Richard C. Vincent USA), Chair until 1995 meeting, and
then move to vice-chair until 1996.   Vice-Chairs are Sean O
Siochru (Ireland) (term expires 1995); and Mustapha Masmoudi
(Tunisia) (exp. 1997).  Masmoudi moves to Chair in 1995, and
returns to Vice-Chair in 1996.  Members-at-Large are: Awatef El-
Rahman (Egypt) (exp. 1995); Florangel Rosario-Braid (Philippines)
(exp. 1996); Kerrick Harvey (USA) (exp. 1997); Kaarle
Nordenstreng (Finland) (exp. 1995); Wolfgang Kleinwachter
(Germany) (exp. 1996), and Michael Traber (U.K.) (exp. 1997).  It
was noted that the new steering committee includes four members
from the previous committee, three members from the Third World
and three women.


6.)  Next Round Table and Future Site Considerations

Mustapha Masmoudi extended an invitation to the group for the
Round Table to next meet in Tunis, Tunisia.  The invitation was
accepted with pleasure.  The 7th MacBride Round Table will be
held March 9-11, 1995.  The Tunisian Association of Communication
(ATUCOM) will serve as host.  The meeting will examine the means
of access and distribution of an "electronic superhighway" system
and the safety of journalists on life-threatening assignments.=20
In addition, the three Working Groups on Gender, Indigenous
People, and Grassroots' Organizations, established by the Round
Table in Honolulu, will continue their work at the Tunis meeting.

Potential future Round Table meeting sites have been identified
as Toronto, Canada; Manila, the Philippines; Leipzig, Germany;
and Paris, France, possibly to coincide with the November 1997
Unesco General Conference.  Formal proposals should be submitted
to the Steering Committee prior to the next Round Table.


                                 * * * * * * *


5.  STEERING COMMITTEE MEMBERS, WITH CONTACT ADDRESSES:


CHAIR:

Richard C. Vincent
Associate Professor
Department of Communication
2560 Campus Road
University of Hawaii, Manoa
Honolulu, Hi 96822
USA
phone: 808-956-3352
fax: 808-956-5591
email: rvincent@uhcc.uhunix.hawaii.edu
      * * *
from mid-August 1994 to late-July 1995:
Richard C. Vincent
Fulbright Scholar
School of Communications
Dublin City University
Dublin 9,
IRELAND
76002551@vax1.dcu.ie
Fax:  351-1-7045447
      351-1-8360830
phone:   351-1-7045220

      * * *

VICE-CHAIR (CHAIR-ELECT):

Mustapha Masmoudi=20
President
Association Tunisia de la Communication
Residence les Olympiades
1003, Tunis
TUNISIA
phone: (216 1)79 39 39 - 79 49 48
fax: (216.1) 79.49.49

      * * *

VICE-CHAIR:

Se=A0n O Siochr=A3
Nexus Europe
9 North Frederick Street
Dublin  1-
IRELAND
phone:  +353-1-8745158
fax: +353-1-8745186
email: siochru@toppsi.gn.apc.org

      * * *

MEMBERS AT LARGE:

Awatef Abdel El-Rahman
Head of Dept. of Journalism
Cairo University
Vice President of ACCE
Cairo,
Egypt
Fax: 20 2 3419383

Kerric Harvey
Asst. Prof. of Communications
RTV/NCCS - Building YY,                =20
812 20th Street, N.W.,
The George Washington University
Washington, D.C.   20052
USA
fax: 202-994-0022
phone: 202-994-4962

Wolfgang Kleinwaechter
Professor
Institute der Medienstadt Leipzig e.v.
(NETCOM Institute)
Muehlstrasse 1
Leipzig,
Saxonia
D(o)-7050
Germany
phone: +49-341-269-9913 (o)
        +49-341-54-801 (h)
fax: 493412699914

Kaarle Nordenstreng
Professor
Department of Journalism and Mass Communication
University of Tampere
P.O.Box 607, 33101 Tampere 10
Finland
phone: +358-31-2156292
FAX +358-31-2156248
Email: tikano@uta.fi
      * * *
from mid-September to December 1994
Visiting Professor
School of Journalism & Mass Communication      =20
University of Minnesota
111 Murphy Hall
206 Church Street, SE
Minneapolis, MN   55455-0418
USA
FAX 612-626-8251
phone: 612-625-3421


Florangel Rosario-Braid, Director
Asian Institute of Journalism
Journal Boulevard, 19th & 20th Streets, Port Area
Manila,
The Philippines
phone and fax:  632 60 76 59

Michael Traber
Director of Studies and Publications
WACC
357 Kennington Lane
LONDON SE11 5QY
ENGLAND
phone:  (71) 582-9139
fax:  (71) 735-0340
email: wacc@geo2.geonet.de
      wacc@gn.apc.org


                                 * * * * * * *


6.  LIST OF PARTICIPANTS


              =20
Jeffrey C. Ady
Department of Communication
University of Hawaii, Manoa
Honolulu, Hi 96822
USA
phone: 808-956-3345
fax: 808-956-5591
jady@uhunix.uhcc.hawaii.edu

A. K. M. Ahsanullah
Bangladesh National Science Technology
      Documentation Centre
Mirpur Road, Dhanonundhi
Dhaka 1205
Bangladesh
phone: 508619
fax: 880-2-865460

Homer G. Angelo
School of Law
University of California
Davis, CA 95616
phone: 916-752-2890
fax:  916-752-4704

Kumiko Aoki            =20
Doctoral Student
1616 Kewalo Street #304
Honolulu, HI   96822
USA
Communication & Information Sciences           =20
University of Hawaii at Manoa
(H):808-521-1761 (B):808-956-3341
kaoki@uhunix.uhcc.hawaii.edu.

Mario Arreola
IPRA
Los Aguilas 1124-A204
San Clemente 01740
Mexico, D.F.
phone: 525 652 4199
fax:   525 568 43 87

Gina Bailey
5339 Poola Street
Honolulu, HI   96821
University of Hawaii
Communication Department
USA
email:bailey@uhunix.uhcc.hawaii.edu

Mashoed Bailie
Dept. of Communication
University of Wisconsin, Oshkosh
Oshkosh, Wisconsin 54901

Michael Basil
Department of Speech
University of Hawaii
Honolulu, HI 96822
USA
phone: (808)956-3320
fax:  (808)956-3947
mbasil@uhunix.uhcc.hawaii.edu
      * * *
after August 1994:
Mass Communications
University of Denver
Denver, Colorado 80208
fax:  303-871-4949

Aidan J. Burke
Department of Mass Communication
University of Southern Queensland
Toowoomba, Queensland 4350
AUSTRALIA
phone: 076-312231
fax:  076-312598

Ron Burnett
Director, Graduate Program in Communication    =20
McGill University, Montreal
3465 Peel Street, MTL. 2VEBEC
CANADA H3A1W7
H:514-398-4110
czbu@musica.mcgill.ca

Desmond Byrne
Chair
the Honolulu-Community Media Council
Honolulu, HI
USA

Rebecca Canter
3743 B
Diamond Head Road
Honolulu, HI  96816
USA
phone: 732-9680
fax: 737-5458

George Chaplin
c/o The Honolulu Advertiser
The Advertiser Bldg.
Honolulu, HI
USA

Chad Compton
BYUH
SS-220 Kulanni
P.O. Box 1822
Laie, HI 96862
USA
phone: 808 293-3627
comptonC@byuh.edu

Thomas W. Cooper
Division of Mass Communication
Emerson College
100 Beacon Street
Boston, MA 02116
USA
fax: 617-578-8509
phone: 617-578-8813; 508-794-0885
      * * *
for 1994-1995:
Department of Communication
2560 Campus Road
University of Hawaii
Honolulu, HI 96822
USA
phone: 808-956-8715
fax:  808-956-5591

Dennis K. Davis, Ph.D.
Professor and Director
School of Communication
Box 8118
University of North Dakota
Grand Forks, ND  58202
USA
phone: (701) 777-2287 (office); 746-5168 (home)
fax: 701-777-3650
email: UD191185@NDSUVM1

Dineh Davis    =20
University of Hawaii at Manoa                  =20
Dept. of Communication                         =20
2560 University Avenue George Hall #340
Honolulu, HI  96822
USA
dineh@uhunix.uhcc.Hawaii.edu
FAX:(808)956-5591
phone: 808-956-3332

Fran Dieudonne
Pan Pacific and Southeast Asia Women's Association and
      Pacific Islands News Association
2322 Sonoma Street
Honolulu, HI 96822
USA
fax: 808-955-6719
phone: 808-947-1827

Kenneth M. Droze
P.O. Box 5392 UOG Station
University of Guam
Mangilao
GUAM  96923
phone: (671) 632-2109

Richard Dubanoski
Dean
College of Social Sciences
University of Hawaii, Manoa
Honolulu, HI 96822
USA

Liz Fell
Lecturer/Journalist                                    =20
P. O. Box 698
Double Bay NSW 2028
AUSTRALIA
FAX:+61-2. 327.8078
phone: +61.2.362.3138

Lowell Frazier
Chair
Department of Journalism
University of Hawaii
Honolulu, HI 96822
USA

Prof. Johan Galtung
51 Bois Chatton
F-01210 VERSONNEX (Ain)
France
phone: 33.50.42.73.06
Fax:  33.50.42.75.06
      * * *
2047 Nu'uanu Ave., Apt 1601
Honolulu, Hawai'i 96817
USA
phone and fax: 1(808)523.5029

Larry Geller
Larry S. Geller Assoc.
2060 Mott-Smith Dr.
Honolulu, HI 96822
USA
phone: (808) 536-6696
fax:  (808) 536-6447
L.GELLER@IEEE.ORG

Arthur Getz
East-West Center
P.O. Box 62251
Honolulu, HI 96839
USA
phone: 808 944-7536
fax:  808 944-7298
arthur@igc.org

Donald J. Gillies
Professor of Communications
Ryerson Polytechnic University
350 Victoria Stret
Toronto, Ontario,
CANADA M5B 2K3
phone: (416)979-5167
Fax:  (416)979-5341
dgilles@malthus.acs.ryerson.ca

Michael Griffin
Asst. Professor                                =20
School of Journalism & Mass Communication      =20
University of Minnesota
111 Murphy Hall
206 Church Street, SE
Minneapolis, MN   55455-0418
USA
fax: 612-625-0888
H phone: 612-624-0888
email: mgriffin@vx.acs.umn.edu

Paul Grosswiler
107 Lord Hall
Department of Journalism & Mass Communication
University of Maine
Orono, ME 04469
USA
phone: 207-581-1287
fax:  207-581-1286
paulg@main

Eric Hagen     =20
1714 Anapuni Street #405
Honolulu, HI   96822
USA
ehagen@Hawaii.edu

Christopher Haig
Heritage Research Productions
367 So. King St, Suite 1780
Honolulu, HI 96813
USA
phone: 808 536 4504
fax:  808 523 7479

Kerric Harvey
Asst. Prof. of Communications
RTV/NCCS - Building YY,                =20
812 20th Street, N.W.,
The George Washington University
Washington, D.C.   20052
USA
fax: 202-994-0022
phone: 202-994-4962

Kumiko D. Hachiya      =20
1566 Wilder Avenue
Honolulu, HI   96822
USA
(808)941-2231 ask for Kumiko, Room #301

Debora Halbert
Department of Political Science
University of Hawaii
Honolulu, HI 96822
USA

Jay M. Heffron
Dept. of Educational Foundations
University of Hawaii
Honolulu, HI 96822
USA

Kraus Heinrich
Meuschelstr.32
90408 N=81rnberg
GERMANY
phone: 49-911-354758

John Houghton
CIRCIT
4 Riverside Quay
South Melbourne, Vic 3205
Australia
phone: +61 3 616 8888
fax: +61 3 616 8800
email: zcirjh@miayos.xx.rmit.oz.au

Miles Jackson
School of Library and Information Studies
University of Hawaii
Honolulu, HI 96822
USA

Meheroo Jussawalla
Senior Fellow/Economist
Sept. of Communications and Journalism
East-West Center
1777 East-West Road
Honolulu, HI  96848-0001
USA
phone: 808-944-7329
fax: 808-944-7670

Simon Kagan
Dept. of Film & Television                          =20
Faculty of Arts
Tel-Aviv University
Tel-Aviv,
ISRAEL
FAX: 972-3-6409482
phone:  972-3-6408403

Crystella Kauka
William S. Richardson School of Law Library
University of Hawaii
Honolulu, HI 96822
USA

Beverly Keever
Department of Journalism
University of Hawaii
Honolulu, HI 96822
USA
fax: 808-956-5396

George Kent
Department of Political Science
University of Hawaii
USA
fax: 956-6877
email: kent@uhunix.uhcc.hawaii.edu

Wolfgang Kleinwaechter
Professor
Institute der Medienstadt Leipzig e.v.
(NETCOM Institute)
Muehlstrasse 1
Leipzig,
Saxonia
D(o)-7050
Germany
phone: +49-341-269-9913 (o)
        +49-341-54-801 (h)
fax: 493412699914

Igor E. Klyukanov
Department of Communication Studies
229 Communications Building, MS-108
Eastern Washington University
Cheney, WA 99004
USA

Ah Jook Ku
Honolulu Community Media Council
Honolulu, HI=20
USA

Poka Laenui
Director
Institute for the Advancement of Hawaiian Affairs
86-649 Puuhulu Road
Wai'anae,
Hawaii 96792-2723
(via USA)
phone: 1-808-696-5157
fax: 1-808-696-7774=20

Suzanna Layton
Fulbright Fellow                                       =20
Department of Journalism
University of Queensland                               =20
Australia
c/o 1712 St. Louis Heights Road
Honolulu, HI   96816
USA
vili@uhunix.uhec.Hawaii.edu
FAX:1-808-956-7053

Louis Leung
Department of Communication
University of Hawaii, Manoa
Honolulu, Hi 96822
USA
phone: 808-956-3347
fax: 808-956-5591
lleung@uhunix.uhcc.hawaii.edu

Christine Levitt
College of Education, University of KY.        =20
Instructional Technology Ctr.
151 Taylor Ed. Bldg.
Lexington, KY   40506-0001
USA
(606)257-7967
calevi00@ukcc.uky.edu

Gevo Mabone
Dept. of Central Province
P.O. Box 2291
Boroko,
Papua New Guinea
phone: (675) 214535
fax: (675) 217215

Mustapha Masmoudi=20
President
Association Tunisia de la Communication
(Chairman of Institute MASSMEDIA)
Residence les Olympiades, Bloc 1
1003, Tunis
TUNISIA
phone: (216 1)79 39 39 - 79 49 48
fax: (216.1) 79.49.49

Lurline McGregor
Executive Director
Pacific Islanders in Communications
Honolulu, HI
Hawaii

Bill Melody
CIRCIT
4 Riverside Quay
S. Melborne, Vic. 3205
AUSTRALIA
phone: 613 616-8888
fax:  613 616-8800

Katrina K. Morris, Esq.
Board of Trustees, Tibet Information Network
729 College Avenue
Menlo Park, CA
USA
also:=20
Schmit Morris Bittner & Schmit                 =20
456 Eighth Street                                      =20
Oakland, CA   94025
USA
phone: 415-321-1494
      576-893-4111 w
fax:  415-323-1201
      576-893-0155 w
e-mail: kmorris@apc.igc.org

Stanford G. Mukasa
Department of Journalism
Indiana University of Pennsylvania
434 Davis Hall
Indiana, PA 15705-1087
USA
fax: 412-357-6213
phone: 412-357-3097
email: mukasa@grove.iup.edu

Henry E. Muradzikwa
Editor-in-Chief
Zimbabwe Inter-Africa News Agency (ZIANA)
P.O. Box 8166
Causeway
ZIMBABWE
fax: 263-4-794336
phone: 263-4-730151/5, 725101, 725103

Stig A. Nohrstedt
University of =99rebro
P.O. Box 923
S-701 30  =99rebro,
SWEDEN
phone:  +46-19-301068
fax: +46-19-331524

Kaarle Nordenstreng
Professor
Department of Journalism and Mass Communication
University of Tampere
P.O.Box 607, 33101 Tampere 10
Finland
phone: +358-31-2156292
FAX +358-31-2156248
Email: tikano@uta.fi
      * * *
from mid-September to December 1994
Visiting Professor
School of Journalism & Mass Communication      =20
University of Minnesota
111 Murphy Hall
206 Church Street, SE
Minneapolis, MN   55455-0418
USA
FAX 612-626-8251
phone: 612-625-3421

Bea Oates
2525 Date St. #1206A
Honolulu, Hawaii 96826
USA
phone: 944-9711

Michael Ogden
CPIS
University of Hawaii
1890 East-West Rd., Moore 215
Honolulu, HI 96822
USA
phone: 808 956-2658
fax:  808 956-7053
ogden@uhunix.uhcc.hawaii.edu
      * * *
after August 1994:
Department of Communication
University of Hawaii, Manoa
Honolulu, Hi 96822
USA
phone: 808-956-8715
fax: 808-956-5591
ogden@uhunix.uhcc.hawaii.edu

Ryota Ono
CIS, U of HI
1330 16th Ave. #B
Honolulu, HI 96816
USA
fax: 808-956-5591
phone: 808-956-6367
email: ryota@uhunix.uhcc.hawaii.edu

Rune Ottosen
International Peace Institute, Oslo (PRIO)
Fuglehauggata 11 0260, Oslo
Norway
fax: (+47)22 55 84 22
phone: (+47)22 55 71 50

Sunny Pai
248 Kaiulani Avenue, Apt.#23
Honolulu, HI   96815
Student, Communication & Info Sciences =20
University of Hawaii
USA
spai@wiliki.eng.hawaii.edu
phone: 808-956-2376 (w)  808-923-1434 (h)
email: spai@wiliki.eng.hawaii.edu

Christopher Paterson
International Communications
Department of Radio-TV-Film
CMA 6.118
University of Texas at Austin
Austin, TX 78712-1091
USA
fax: 512-471-4077
phone: 512-471-6627

Bonnie Peng
College of Communication
National Chengchi University
Taipei, Taiwan
USA
Phone:  02-939-6857
Fax:  02-938-7212=20

Anthony Pennings
Communication
Victoria University
Wellington,
New Zealand
phone: O64-4-472-1000
fax:  64-4-495-5235
Pennings@matai.uvw.ac.nz

Dr. Florangel Rosario-Braid, Director
Asian Institute of Journalism
Journal Boulevard, 19th & 20th Streets, Port Area
Manila,
The Philippines
FAX:  632 60 76 59
Miriam Rosenthal
6750 Hawaii Kai Drive #407
Honolulu, HI   96825
USA
(H)808-395-4872=20
rosentha@uhunix.uhcc.Hawaii.edu
FAX:  808-396-0584
Phone: 808-395-4872

Ramona R. Rush
Professor of Communications                    =20
College of Communications
248 Grehan Bldg.
University of Kentucky
Lexington, KY  40506-0042
USA
also:
3194 Pimlico Pkwy.
Lexington, KY 40517-4041
USA
fax: 606-257-7818
phone: 606-272-2723
rrrush@ukcc.uky.edu

Kenji Saga
Professor
International Relations
Asia University
Tokyo
JAPAN
phone: 0422-54-3111 (Ext)2411
fax:  0422-36-4644
internet: saga@apic.or.jp

Richard Salvador
University of Hawaii - Manoa
2424 Maile Way=20
Porteus 640
Honolulu, HI   96822
USA
H:(808)956-8141
Doctoral Candidate, Political Science
salvador@uhunix.Hawaii.Edu

David Schuelke
Department of Rhetoric
(Technical Communication Program)
University of Minnesota, Twin Cities
202 Haecker Hall
1364 Eckles Avenue
St. Paul, Minnesota
USA
Hemant Shah
School of Journalism and Mass Communication
University of Wisconsin-Madison
5115 Vilas Hall
821 University Avenue
Madison, WI  53706
USA
fax: 608-262-1361
phone: 608-263-2928
      608-263-4498
email: hshah@wiscmacc.bitnet

Nikhil Sinha
Department of Radio-TV-Film
University of Texas at Austin
Austin, TX 78712
USA
fax: 512-471-4077
nsinha@utxvm.utexas.edu

Se=A0n O Siochr=A3
Nexus Europe
9 North Frederick Street
Dublin 1-
IRELAND
phone:  +353-1-8745158
fax: +353-1-8745186
email: siochru@toppsi.gn.apc.org

Rich Somerville
Editor of Honolulu Advertiser's Aloha Aina
Advertiser Bldg.
Honolul, HI
USA

K. Dean Stephens
The Vanguard Trust
P. O. Box 990
Haleiwa, Hawaii 96712-0990
phone: 808 637-3173
fax:  808 637-3173

Jitraporn Sudhivoraseth
Deputy Dean for Research & Foreign Affairs     =20
Faculty of Communication Arts,=20
Chulalongkorn University
Phyathai Rd., Bangkok 10330
THAILAND
phone: (02) 218-2161
fcoajsd@chulkn.chula.ac.th

Michael Sysiuk
Department of Political Science
University of Hawaii
Honolulu, HI 96822
USA

Aino Tarjanne
(Observer)
No contact

Pekka Tarjanne
Secretary General
International Telecommunications Union (ITU)
Place des Nations
CH-1211 Geneva  20-
Switzerland
phone: 41-22-730-5969
fax: 71-22-733-7256

Majid Tehranian
Department of Communication
University of Hawaii, Manoa
Honolulu, Hi 96822
USA
phone: 808-956-3353
fax: 808-956-5591
majid@uhunix.uhcc.hawaii.edu
      * * *
June 17-August 7, 1994:
The Institute for Political and International Studies
P. O. Box 19395 - 1793
Tehran,
Iran
phone: 011-9821-457-1010 (15)
fax: 011-9821-270-964
      * * *
Aug. 7, 1994-June 17, 1995:
Center for the Study of World Religions
Harvard University
42 Francis Avenue
Cambridge, MA 02138
USA
phone: 617-495-4476
fax: 617-496-5411Division of Mass Communication

John Tiffin
Communication Studies
Victoriqan University
P.O. 600
Wellington
NEW ZEALAND
phone: 4-4721000
tiffin@matai.vuw.ac.nz

Don Topping
Director
Social Science Research Institute (SSRI)
University of Hawaii
Honolulu, HI 96822
USA

Michael Traber
Director of Studies and Publications
WACC
357 Kennington Lane
LONDON SE11 5QY
ENGLAND
phone:  (71) 582-9139
fax:  (71) 735-0340
email: wacc@geo2.geonet.de
      wacc@gn.apc.org

Oddgeir Tveiten
University of Bergen
Fasswinckels GT. 6
5007 Bergen
NORWAY
home:
Hagerups Vei 4B
5030-Land=86s
PHONE: 55549113
FAX: 55549149
oddgeir.Tveiten@media.uib.no

Catherine Van Horn
Communication Studies
257 Communication Arts Center
The University of Northern Iowa
Cedar Falls, Iowa 50614-0357
USA
also:
850 Maucker Road
Cedar Falls, IA   50613
USA
fax: 319-273-2731
phone: 319-273-5899
email: Vanhorn@cobra.uni.edu

Sarah K. Vann  =20
Professor Emeritus
School of Library & Information Studies
University of Hawaii at Manoa
2550 The Mall
Honolulu, HI   96822
USA
also:
Pan Pacific and Southeast Asia Women's Association and                 =20
Pacific Islands News Association
1022 Prospect Street, Apt. 1108
Honolulu, HI 96822
USA
phone: 808-537-1807

Duane Varan
Department of Communication
University of Hawaii
Honolulu, HI 96822
USA
phone: 808-956-3344
fax: 808-956-5591
varan@uhunix.uhcc.hawaii.edu

Gregory R. Viggiano
Department of Communication
Florida State University
2301-C Mission Road
Tallahassee, Florida 32304-2662
USA

Richard C. Vincent
Department of Communication
2560 Campus Road
University of Hawaii, Manoa
Honolulu, Hi 96822
USA
phone: 808-956-3352
fax: 808-956-5591
email: rvincent@uhcc.uhunix.hawaii.edu
      * * *
from August 1994-July 1995:
Richard C. Vincent
Fulbright Scholar
School of Communications
Dublin City University
Dublin 9,
IRELAND
76002551@vax1.dcu.ie
Fax:  351-1-7045447
      351-1-8360830
phone:   351-1-7045220

Eunice Wang
East-West Center Fellow
EWC Box 1149
1777 East-West Road
Honolulu, HI 96848
phone: 808- 9453615
fax:  808- 9453615
hsiao@uhunix.uhcc.hawaii.edu

Dan Wedemeyer
Chair
Department of Communication
University of Hawaii, Manoa
Honolulu, Hi 96822
USA
phone: 808-956-3356
fax: 808-956-5589
danw@uhunix.uhcc.hawaii.edu

Wendy White
Fellow, University of Hawaii   =20
University Station - Box 600
2440 Campus Road
Honolulu, HI   96822
USA
(also: Journalist-Seattle Post-Intelligencer)
(808)956-9187
white@uhunix.uhcc.hawaii.edu
vili@uhunix.uhec.Hawaii.edu
FAX:1-808-956-7053
phone: 808-956-9187

Dwayne Winseck
Communication Department
1910 University Drive
Boise State University
Boise, Idaho 83725
phone: 208-385-3562
fax: 208-385-1069

Ante Xu
CIRCIT
4 Riverside Quay
South Melbourne, Victoria 3205
Australia
phone: 61-3-6168888
fax:  61-3-6168800
email: circit@rmit.edu.au

Sunny Yoon
Sogang University
Dobong Ku Soo You
3 Dong 166-21
Seoul
South Korea
phone: 82-02-905-5871
email: syoon@krewhacc.bitnet


                                 * * * * * * *

7.  STATUTES

of the "MacBride Round Table on Communication"



Article 1.   Name and Founding Seat.  The name of this
organization shall be the MacBride Round Table on Communication.=20
The founding Seat of this organization shall be Dublin, Ireland.=20
The laws that govern these Statutes are the laws of Ireland.


Article 2.   Purpose.  The purpose of this organization shall be
to serve as a forum for reflection on global communication
problems, and to promote democratization of mass media,
telecommunications and electronic networks, in line with the
Right to Communicate as a basic human right of individuals and
communities.


Article 3.   Methods of Work.  The principal methods of work of
this organization shall be:

(a)     organizing annual meetings

(b)     issuing annual reports

(c)     stimulating networking among interested individuals,
institutions and non-governmental organizations

(d)     addressing intergovernmental organizations, in particular
within the United Nations

(e)     encouraging grass roots education and action.


Article 4.   Headquarters.  The location of the initial
secretariat shall be Honolulu, Hawaii. This may be changed by a
decision of the Annual Meeting or of the Steering Committee.
=20

Article 5.   Membership.

(a)     Individual Membership.  Membership shall be open to any
person who is active in organizing, advocating, writing or
teaching about the purposes of this organization, and is
committed to its principles.

(b)     Organizational Membership.  Membership shall be available
to any institution or organization which is active in organizing,
advocating, writing or teaching about the purposes of this
organization, and is committed to its principles.

(c)     Membership Procedure.  Applications for membership shall
be made to the Steering Committee which can accept them and
decide on the number of votes they are entitled to cast at the
Annual Meeting.

(d)     Dues.  The Annual Meeting is authorized to establish a
dues structure, for individual and organizational memberships.=20
In establishing a dues structure, the Meeting shall make due
provision for organizations and individuals with limited access
to funds. Once established, payment of dues may be made a
requirement for membership.


Article 6.   Organs.  The principal organs of this organization
are the Annual Meeting and the Steering Committee.  The operating
organs, as authorized by the Annual Meeting or the Steering
Committee are: subcommittees and working groups.


Article 7.   The Annual Meeting.

a)  The Annual Meeting is the supreme organ of the Round Table,
and can take any decision in the name of the Round Table
including the modification of these Statutes.

b)  The Annual Meeting is called at least once every year.

c)  There shall take part in the Annual Meeting with power to
vote member organizations as represented by their delegates; they
shall be entitled to cast the number of votes allocated to their
organizations; individual members and persons invited by the
Steering Committee shall have one vote each.

d)  The Steering Committee shall initially decide the number of
votes at the disposal of each member organization.  No such
organization shall have less than two or more than ten votes.=20
The Annual Meeting, voting initially pursuant to the allocations
of the Steering Committee, may alter the allocation of votes to
organizations.


Article 8.   The Steering Committee.  When the Round Table is not
sitting, all the powers exercisable by the Round Table, except
that of modifying these Statutes, shall be exercisable by the
Steering Committee.

a)  Composition of the Steering Committee.  The Steering
Committee shall be composed of a chair, two vice chairs, a
treasurer, and at least three, but no more than five other
members at large.  The Steering Committee shall be elected to
reflect North-South, geographical and gender balance.

b)  Election.  The officers and at-large members of the Steering
Committee are elected by the Annual Meeting.  The Steering
Committee can fill any vacancy caused by the resignation,
disability or death of an officer an at-large member of the
Steering Committee and can add new members to the Steering
Committee.

c)  Rights and Duties of the Steering Committee shall be:
      -   to organize an annual Round Table on Communication
      -   to represent the organization at international
            conferences
      -   to publish a newsletter and an annual report.

d)  Decisions of the Steering Committee shall be taken by a
majority of those voting.  If however the number of those voting
is less than half of the members of the Steering Committee, the
decision of the Steering Committee shall be ratified by the next
Annual Meeting.


Article 9.   Finances.

a)  The income of the Round Table is derived from:

      -  annual dues of its members, the amount being fixed
      by the Steering Committee.  Organizational members
      shall pay dues based on the number of members that they
      have;
      -  donations and grants, the sale of the Round Table's
      publications and any other moneys raised for the Round
      Table's funds.


b)  The treasurer has authority to sign cheques and money orders
on the Round Table's behalf.


Article 10.   Audit.

a)  The Annual Meeting shall appoint an Auditing Committee of
three members;

b)  The Auditing Committee shall audit the Round Table's finances
once a year and present a report to the Annual Meeting.


Article 11.   Amendment of the Statutes.  A two thirds majority
of the votes present and entitled to vote at the Annual Meeting
is necessary to amend these Statutes.


Article 12.  Dissolution.  The Round Table can be dissolved by
the Round Table or the Steering Committee only with a majority of
two thirds of the votes cast.  In the event of dissolution, only
the Round Table or the Steering Committee has the right to
dispose of the Round Table's assets.



                                 * * * * * * *


8.  CALL FOR PAPERS AND PARTICIPATION

7th MacBride Round Table
March 9-11, 1995, in Tunis, Tunisia                  =20



INTERNATIONAL INFORMATION SUPERHIGHWAY:
TOWARDS A NEW WORLD ORDER IN COMMUNICATION?


The "Information Superhighway" promises to be the next revolution
in communications.  As the U.S., Europe, and Japan continue their
initiatives to create the most advanced communications systems
yet developed, researchers, journalists and media practitioners
are questioning if the "Superhighway" will be routed through the
wealthier countries while by-passing developing nations.  Equally,=20
benefits may go to a few, and the ultimate cost to many could be high.

The Tunisian Association will organize in Tunisia, on March 9 -
11, 1995 with the participants of the 7th MacBride Round Table, a
Symposium about the theme:

INTERNATIONAL INFORMATION SUPERHIGHWAY: Toward a New
Communication Society

Topics to be covered will include, but not restricted to:

      - The operation of "Superhighways" in "Tele-training",
      "tele-education", "Tele-work", "Tele-services", "Tele-
      medicine" and other areas

      - The infrastructure of "Superhighways" and their
      regulation, ethics, control and administration

      - The role of developing nations in "Superhighways"

      - How "Superhighways" new importance affects and
      redefines National boundaries and rights of
      communication

      - What is the cultural utility of a "Superhighway"

      - The impact and role of the superhighways on NGOs
      and Grass Roots movements

The conference also welcomes papers on global communications
issues outside the "Information Superhighway": media empowerment
for Women's and grass roots' organizations, the safety of
journalists in life-threatening trouble spots, and human rights
in communications.  The conference also welcomes workshop
proposals.

One page abstracts (in English, Arabic or French) for the 7th
MacBride Round Table must be received on or before November 30,
1994.  *Two copies* of the abstracts and any additional
correspondence should be submitted simultaneously to *both*
individuals listed below:



Dr. Richard C. Vincent
Fulbright Scholar, and
Chair, MacBride Round Table Steering Committee
School of Communications
Dublin City University
Dublin 9,
IRELAND
      * * *
phone:   351-1-7045220
Fax:  351-1-7045447
      351-1-8360830
Ireland e-mail: 76002551@vax1.dcu.ie
U.S. e-mail: rvincent@uhunix.uhcc.hawaii.edu


AND


MUSTAPHA MASMOUDI, President
Association for Tunisienne de la Communication
25 Avenue Habib Bourguiba 1001
Tunis,
Tunisia
      * * *
phone: (216 1)79 39 39 - 79 49 48
fax: (216.1) 79.49.49



Abstracts will be reviewed by the Round Table.  Authors will be
notified, and copies of the accepted papers will be due in finished
form by February 15, 1995.

Accepted papers may be published in a collection bringing
together the work of the 7th MacBride Round Table, pending
author's permission.=20