Communication Institute for Online Scholarship
Communication Institute for Online
Scholarship Continous online service and innovation
since 1986
Site index
 
ComAbstracts Visual Communication Concept Explorer Tables of Contents Electronic Journal of Communication ComVista

Electronic Journal of Communication
EJC logo
The Electronic Journal of Communication / La Revue Electronique de Communication


Volume 3 December 1993 Numbers 3 & 4

CONTEMPORARY ISSUES AND PERSPECTIVES IN AUSTRALIAN
COMMUNICATION STUDIES
PROBLEMES POSES ET POINTS DE VUE EXPRIMES DANS LES ETUDES
AUSTRALIENNES DES COMMUNICATIONS

Editor/Editeur:
Bill Ticehurst
University of Technology, Sydney

--------------
EJC/REC Staff:

Managing Editor: Teresa M. Harrison
French Editor: Lucien Gerber
Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute


ELECTRONIC JOURNAL OF COMMUNICATION
LA REVUE ELECTRONIQUE DE COMMUNICATION

Volume 3 December 1993 Numbers 3 & 4

CONTEMPORARY ISSUES AND PERSPECTIVES IN AUSTRALIAN
COMMUNICATION STUDIES
PROBLEMES POSES ET POINTS DE VUE EXPRIMES DANS LES ETUDES
AUSTRALIENNES DES COMMUNICATIONS

Introduction

This special issue of the Electronic Journal of Communication /La Revue Electronique de Communication (EJC/REC) focuses on contemporary issues and perspectives in Australian communication studies. The contributed papers provide a selected overview of communication scholarship by a diverse group of scholars and practitioners concerned with the study of communication theory, research, practice and policy in Australia.

It can be argued that the development of the communication field in Australia has been privileged. Through history and geography, Australian communication scholars have been placed at a confluence of European critical/cultural philosophies and North American scientific/administrative traditions. As well, communication scholars have been relatively well supported financially, and the field has benefited through the expansion and development of tertiary education in Australia over the past twenty years.

Within this context, the first paper by Peter Putnis from Bond University on the Gold Coast, presents a review and analysis of the development of the field of communication studies in Australia, and describes contemporary preoccupations and international perspectives of Australian communication scholars.

The next two papers reflect Australian's ongoing search and concern for a national identity. Their search is placed in the context of a country founded on Anglo-Celtic traditions, but now with a multicultural population, and located in the emerging Asia/Pacific economic region.

Bruce Molloy, from Queensland University of Technology in Brisbane, discusses two uniquely Australian attempts at incorporating multicultural programming within Australian television. He concludes that the Special Broadcasting Service (SBS), catering for ethnic minorities, has been more has been more successful than the Imparja model, an initiative aimed at providing a commercial television service with some Aboriginal programming, in remote central Australia.

Glen Lewis and Graeme Osborn, from the University of Canberra, describes a survey of teaching and research in Asian communication studies in Australian universities. Although Australian communication scholars have fewer language skills than traditional Asia scholars, they are engaged in an increasing amount of research supervision in this area.

Australia has a high rate of acceptance of information and communication technologies. Consequently, policy development and information technology management are high on the list of concerns of Australian communication scholars. Greg Hearn and his co-workers from The Communication Centre at Queensland University of Technology argue here that there is a complex and interactive relationship between technological and social change which renders the processes of technological development open to influence by human activity and choice.

In the same arena, Lelia Green from Edith Cowan University, Perth, Western Australia, examines the power implications of information in information societies, and the accelerating shift in the balance of power between citizens as information providers and their governments as information collectors.

Issues relating to Australian journalism are addressed in two papers from the Journalism Department at the University of Queensland. John Henningham provides the results of Australia's first comprehensive survey of journalist's employed by mainstream news media, which indicates a workgroup who are job satisfied and well educated, but hold contradictory views and values, and are struggling to come to grips with changing media environments and community expectations.

Geoff Turner examines quality journalism's role in Australia's communication media. With little more than half as many journalists per capita compared with the United States, the opportunity for diversity and quality of news media as a basis for democratic debate is diminished. The author discusses ways that the Australian government could ensure that news media fulfil their social responsibility, but concludes that such intervention to protect the public interest is unlikely.

The next paper, by John Sinclair from Victoria University of Technology, describes a new research paradigm, "the Domestic Paradigm", in which audiences are seen as "active" in their use of communication and information technologies in their homes. His paper outlines the theoretical and methodological development of this paradigm, and reports the results of a pilot study which sought to incorporate this approach in research on the use of communication and information technologies in Melbourne households.

The final paper is presented by Michael Kaye from the University of Technology, Sydney. In this paper he describes the development of a new applied communication perspective known as "adult communication management", and outlines the way this perspective has been utilised in the initial and continuing development needs of Australian adult vocational educators.

The papers presented here provide examples of contemporary issues and perspectives in Australian communication studies. Clearly, this selected overview cannot be seen as representing the full range and diversity of communication scholarship which characterises the field in Australia today. Readers seeking wider perspectives in particular fields are referred to the _Australian Journal of Communication_, _Media Information Australia_, and the _Australian Journalism Review_ for more information.

As special editor of this issue it has been pleasing to play a role in the further development of the EJC/REC as an international journal. I trust that readers will find this issue interesting and informative.

Finally, I would like to express my appreciation to all the authors of the papers considered for publication in this issue, and to the anonymous reviewers for their valuable support and constructive comments.

Bill Ticehurst
School of Management
University of Technology, Sydney
PO Box 222, Lindfield 2070 Australia
Phone (61) (2) 330 5472 (Voice mail available for messages)
FAX (61) (2) 330 5583
Internet: Billt@uts.edu.au


Introduction

Ce numero special de la Revue Electronique de Communication / Electronic Journal of Communication (REC/EJC) focalise sur les problemes poses et les points du vue actuels exprimes dans les etudes australiennes des communications. Les articles qui ont contribue a ces etudes donnent une vue d'ensemble, quoique selective, des travaux de communication accomplis par un groupe varie de'erudits et de specialistes engages dans l'etude de la theorie des communications, de la recherche et de la pratique de celle-ci ainsi que de l'impulsion que lui impreme la politique en Australie.

On peut avancer que l'univers de la communication a connu en essor marquant grace a sa position privilegiee. Du fait de leur passe historique et de leur position geographique, les specialistes australiens des communications se sont retrouves au carrefour, d'une part, des philosophies culturelles et des ecole critique europeenes, et d'autre part, des tradition scientifiques et administratives nord-americanes. De plus, les specialistes des communications jouissent d'un soutien financier non negligeable, et le domaine des communications profite largement de la croissance et du developpement de l'enseignment superieur en Australie depuis plus de vingt an.

Dans le cadre de cet essai, Peter Putnis de la Bond University, situee sur la cote "Gold Coast", fait un tour d'horizon et effectue l'analyse du developpement des etudes des communications en Australie dans le premier article. Il y decrit les preoccupations presentes et les points due vue internationaux des specialistes australiens des communication.

Les deux articles suivants ont trait aux recherches en cour et a l'interet porte a l'identite nationale. Leurs recherches se deroulent dans le cadre d'un pays fonde sur les traditions anglo-celtes, mais dont la population est a present multiculturelle, et dans une region economique en pleine expansion dans le pacifique asiatique.

Bruce Molloy de la Queensland University of Technology, sise a Brisbane, analyse deux tentatives australienne uniques d'integrer des emissions multiculturelles dans la programmation de la television australienne. Il conclut que la "Special Broadcasting Service (SBS)" qui realise des emissions destinees aux minorites ethniques a eu un plus gros succes que le modele Imparja, une initiative qui vise a mettre a la disposition du public une chaine de television privee assortie d'emisions aborigenes pour un public habitant au fin fond due centre de l'Australie.

Glen Lewis et Graeme Osborne de l'Universite de Canberra decrit une enquete menee sur l'enseignement et la recherche dans les etudes asiatiques des communications dans les universites australiennes. Les specialistes australiens des communications dirigent de plus en plus des travaux de recherche dans le domaine cite ci-dessus, bien que leurs connaissances des langues soient plus limitees chez eux que chez les specialistes traditionnels des etudes asiatiques.

Les Australiens sont dans l'ensemble tres favorables a la dissemination des informations et des techniques de communication chez eux. Voila pourquoi les prises de position et la gestion des techniques d'information sont une des preoccupation majeures chez les specialistes australiens des communications. Greg Hearn et ses collegues du Centre de Communication de la Queensland University of Technology maintiennent qu'il existe des rapports reciproques et complexes entre les mutation sociales et les evolutions techniques, qui permettent aux participants d'influencer aussi bien par leurs actions que par leurs choix le processus des developpements techniques.

Dans le meme ordre d'idees Lelia Green de la Cowan University, sise a Perth en Australie occidentale, examine de pres l'emprise que peut exercer l'information dans une societe liee a l'information, et la decalage sans cesse croissant de l'equilibre des pouvoirs entre le particulier en tant que fournisseur d'informations et les Pouvoirs Publics en tant que receptionnaires d'informations.

Des questions afferentes au journalisme australien sont posees dans deux articles provenant du departement de journalisme de l'Universite de Queensland. John Henningham fournit les resultats d'une enquete detailee faite sur les journalistes employes par la presse ecrite et parlee. Cette enquete revele que le personnel est satisfait de son travail, qu'il possede une bonne formation, mais aux valeurs et aux avis contradictoires, et qu'il s'efforce de concilier les changements survenant dans le milieu des media et l'attente du public.

Geoff Turner analyse le role de la qualite du journalisme dans les media. Etant donne qu'il y a tout juste un peu plus de la moitie de journalistes par personne qu'aux Etats Unis, il existe tres peu d'occasions de pourvoir le public de la diversite et de la qualite des informations qui puissent servir de base a des debats democratiques. L'auteur discute des moyens par lesquel les Pouvoirs Publics australiens pourraient aider la presse a assumer ses responsabilites civiques, mais conclut que ces memes Pouvoirs Publics ne sont pas pres d'intervenir pour defendre l'interet public.

Dan l'article suivant John Sinclair de la Victoria University of Technology decrit un nouveau modele de recherce "le modele-menage" qui permet de constater que le public utilise les techniques de communication et d'information dans les foyers d'une manier "active". Son article retrace le developpement theorique et methodologique de ce modele et rapporte les resultats d'une etude-pilote qui s'efforce de connaitre de cette facon l'usage que les menages de Melbourne font des technique de communications et d'informations.

Le dernier article a ete redige par Michael Kaye de l'University of Technology de Sidney. Dans cet article il expose de developpement d'un nouvel ensemble de concepts mis en application en communication connus sous l'expression "gestion de la communication pour adultes". Il y decrit comment ces concepts peuvent servir aux besoins du developpement initial et continu des enseignants des ecoles professionnelles pour adults.

Les articles presentes ici fournissent des exemples de problemes poses et de points de vue exprimes dans les etudes des communications en Australie. Il va de soi que ces quelques travaux ne representent aucunement l'ensemble des etudes des communcations ni leurs diversites qui marquent actuellement le champ des etudes et des recherches en communication, en Australie. Les lecteurs qui chercent des renseignments supplementaires dans un domaine propre sont pries de consulter les revues suivantes: _Australian Journal of Communication_, _Media Information Australia_ et _Australian Journalism Review_.

En tant que redacteur special de ce numero je me rejois de la part que j'ai prise dans l'accroissement de la diffusion de la revue REC/EJC qui se veut internationale. J'ose esperer que les lecteur trouveront la lecture de ce numero special interessante et instructive.

Pour terminer, j'aimerais exprimer ma gratitude a tous les auteurs de ces articles qu'on a choisi de faire imprimer dans ce nomero, et a tous ceus qui on bien voulu prendre en charge la lecture et la mise au net des manuscrits et dont j'apprecie les suggestions.

Bill Ticehurst
School of Management
University of Technology, Sydney
PO Box 222, Lindfield 2070 Australia
Phone (61) (2) 330 5472 (Voice mail available for messages)
FAX (61) (2) 330 5583
Internet: Billt@uts.edu.au


Copyright 1993
Communication Institute for Online Scholarship, Inc.