Communication Institute for Online Scholarship
Communication Institute for Online
Scholarship Continous online service and innovation
since 1986
Site index
 
ComAbstracts Visual Communication Concept Explorer Tables of Contents Electronic Journal of Communication ComVista

Electronic Journal of Communication
EJC logo
The Electronic Journal of Communication / La Revue Electronique de Communication


Volume 4 September 1994 No. 1

INTERNATIONAL MEDIA RESEARCH IN THE WAKE OF GLASNOST
RECHERCHES INTERNATIONALES DIRIGEES DANS LE
DOMAINE DES COMMUNICATIONS DE MASSE
A LA VEILLE DE GLASNOST

Editor/Editeur:
Thomas Jacobson
State University of New York at Buffalo


ELECTRONIC JOURNAL OF COMMUNICATION
LA REVUE ELECTRONIQUE DE COMMUNICATION

Volume 4 September 1994 Number 1
INTERNATIONAL MEDIA RESEARCH IN THE WAKE OF GLASNOST

Introduction

Post World War II preoccupations with the East-West struggle for global power have had a profound effect on international communication research. Rostow's Stages of Economic Growth, a significant contribution to the theory of modernization which oriented many development communication researchers, was an "anti-communist manifesto." Siebert, Peterson and Schramm's Four Theories of the Press, comprises a classification that most distinctly contrasts a libertarian from a Soviet styled party-controlled press. The West's reaction to the call for a New World Information and Communication Order was directed more to the Soviet Union's support for the call than to the call's expression of Third World concerns. And, of course, not only has news coverage of the Soviet Block been extensive, but so has research on this coverage.

It is evident that the effect of political matters on communication theory and research has been significant, and this in turn suggests that the recent political changes in Eastern Europe might again impact theory and research. The question is, what might this impact be? Shall research concern East Block countries more, or less? Will studies in press freedom be affected in any way? Will news coverage range more evenly across the globe? Will the Third World's call for a new information and communication order be as effectively eclipsed in communication theory and research as it was in diplomatic rhetoric by George Bush's pronouncement of a New, yet very different kind of, World Order?

The essays presented in this issue were submitted in response to a call for papers on this subject. They each address the matter, either by arguing specifically in this regard or by analyzing media processes using recently available information and then drawing conclusions about the adequacy of previous theory and research.

One of the sources from which communication research might take some instruction in the post-Glasnost era lies in studies of East-European press systems themselves. Teresa Sasinska-Klas addresses progress toward press freedom in Poland, and Western news coverage of this process. She argues that news coverage has tended to portray Glasnost as beginning with Gorbachev, and to suggest that news reporting prior to Glasnost was uniformly subject to party controlled censorship. Alternatively, she argues that resistance to censorship long predates the Glasnost era, and that Polish journalism is best seen as a constantly changing series of expansions and retractions of press freedom. She also indicates that political and economic policy changes will not be sufficient in themselves to develop an adequately functioning free press. A new press culture must evolve, she suggests, embodying new practices and expectations not only on the part of Polish journalists but on the part of Polish news audiences as well.

Newly revealed information and the freedom to travel provide hitherto unavailable opportunities for in depth analysis. John Downing's extensive two-part report covers media related changes in Russia, Poland and Hungary since the 1980s. It includes a review of media theories current in the United States, including agenda-setting, cultivation analysis, gatekeeping theory, and others, for their ability to guide research into media processes in these three countries. He finds as a result that much media research has been overly media centric, paying insufficient attention to economic forces, international relations, the State, political movements and cultural production as a whole.

One potential shift in international communication research might be an increase in attention to certain kinds of regional study. A distressing feature of post glasnost international relations results from political strife related to ethnic identity and nationalism, in areas ranging from states of the former Soviet Union to the Middle East, and elsewhere. Swedish peace researcher Joeran Carlsson argues that changes in current journalistic practices will be required if regional strife is to be adequately understood and reported. He suggests that peace researchers and other social scientists work together with journalists in order to bring interdisciplinary resources to bear on complex reporting problems.

The authors noted so far have addressed conditions in various post-glasnost geographies. Alan Palmer addresses the research and theory challenges of a different "post," i.e. postmodernity. As Palmer points out, postmodernism is notoriously difficult to define in a theoretical or philosophical sense, having influenced fields of study ranging from architecture to literature, philosophy and others. Despite, or perhaps because of, its openness however, postmodernism may offer a promising vantage point from which to view the increasing interplay of cultures worldwide. If much attention was previously centered on the East-West axis, then one legacy of the Soviet Union's demise may be a decentering of this attention. International communication theory has traditionally embodied values associated with the industrialized West, both in the problems to which it attends and in the lense through which it views them. The Salman Rushdie affair, as Palmer analyzes it, dramatically illustrates some of the difficulties that result from Western interpretations of events whose origins are distant culturally. He offers a number of suggestions for theory and research that highlight the importance of culture.

The subjects raised in these papers suggest only a few of the topics that might warrant additional attention in the post-glasnost era. What is perhaps most instructive is less the range of topics they open up, than what they suggest in common. They each suggest, implicitly or explicitly, that the preoccupation with the East-West power struggle has been accompanied by a tendency to reduce our understanding of many events and processes to their reflections of polar extremes in this struggle. Alternatively, these papers aim to illustrate the complexity of social systems within which media operate, and they argue for increased sensitivity social and cultural dimensions of communication systems.

Thanks go to the _Electronic Journal of Communication/La Revue Electronique de Communication_ (EJC/REC) for making possible the assemblage of such a group of papers, and to anonymous reviewers for the contribution of their valuable time and effort.

Thomas Jacobson
State University of New York at Buffalo


RECHERCHES INTERNATIONALES DIRIGEES DANS LE
DOMAINE DES COMMUNICATIONS DE MASSE
A LA VEILLE DE GLASNOST

Introduction

Les preoccupations suscitees, apres la deuxieme guerre mondiale, par les deux camps adverses est-ouest pour la domination mondiale ont profondement influence les recherches dans la communication internationale. Rostow, dans son ouvrage intitule:<< Etapes dans la croissance economique>> contribua d'une facon eloquente a la theorie de la modernisation qui ouvrit la voie a beaucoup de chercheurs engages dans la communication evolutive. Cet ouvrage passait pour un manifeste anticommuniste. Le << Quatre theories de la presse >> de Siebert, Peterson et Schramm renferme un classement qui met en opposition une presse libertaire et une presse dominee par le Parti sovietique. La reaction du bloc occidental a l'appel d'un nouvel ordre mondial de l'information et de la communication se traduit par une opposition systematique a cet appel auquel l'Union sovietique avait donne son adhesion plutot que par un manque d'interet a la formulation des preoccupations du Tiers Monde que cet appel incarne. Et comme de juste, non seulement de nombreux reportages ayant trait a l'Union sovietique ont ete fates, mais ces memes reportages ont donne lieu a des travaux de recherches.

Il va de soi que les decisions politiques pesent lourdement sur les theories de la communication et sur le recherche, ce qui signifie que les changements politiques survenus recemment en Europe de l'Est agissent directement par voie de consequence sur l'elaboration et l'orientation des theories et de la recherche. La question est de savoir quelles en seront les consequences. Doit-on intensifier ou, au contraire, ralentir la recherche sur les pays de l'Europe orientale? Les etudes sur la liberte de presse en seront-elles touchees d'une facon ou d'une autre? La presse accordera-t-elle la meme importance a toutes les informations quelles qu'elles soient et d'ou qu'elles viennent? L'appel a un nouvel ordre d'information et de communication par le Tiers Monde sera-t-il mitige dans les theories de la communication et dans la recherche comme ce fut le cas dans les discours prononces par le President Bush ou il annoncait un ordre mondial nouveau mais combien different.

Les articles parus dans ce numero ont ete rediges a la suite d'une invitation a presenter des etudes portant sur le sujet traite ci-dessus. Chaque article aborde le sujet en question soit en traitant le sujet lui-meme soit en analysant les procedes mediatiques en se fondant sur les dernieres informations valables, et ensuite en formulant les conclusions au sujet du merite des theories et de la recherche qui ont precede.

Une des sources dans laquelle la recherche sur les communications pourrait puiser est les etudes des systemes de presse tels qu'ils existent en Europe de l'Est a l'ere postglasnostien. Teresa Sasinska-Klas aborde le sujet du progres de la liberte de presse en Pologne ainsi que les reportages qui en ont ete faites par la presse occidentale. Elle soutient que la presse avait tendance a faire croire au public que Glasnost avait debute sous le regime de Gorbachev et a affirmer que les articles de presse avant l'avenement de Glasnost etaient regulierement soumis a la censure du Parti politique au pouvoir. D'autre part, elle pretend que la resistence a la censure precede l'ere glasnostienne, et que la presse polonaise donne plutot l'impression d'une succession de gain et de perte de la liberte de presse. De plus, elle avance que les changements politiques et economiques ne suffiront pas en eux-memes a la formation et a la progression d'une presse libre. Une nouveau comportement de la presse exprimant de nouvelles habitudes et repondant a une nouvelle attente ausssi bien de la part des journalistes que des lecteurs doit en resulter, selon elle.

Des informations mises au tour recemment ainsi que la liberte de deplacement offrent aux journalistes des occasions inesperees de faire des etudes de fond. L'ample rapport en deux parties de John Downing a pour objet l'analyse des changements survenus dans la presse en Russie, en Pologne et en Hongrie depuis les annees quatre-vingts. L'auteur passe en revue les conventions relatives a la presse actuellement en vigueur aux Etats Unis y inclus celles regissant les ordres du jour, les analyses de <> le choix et le tri des informations et bien d'autres pour en demontrer leurs aptitudes a diriger la recherche dans les procedes mediatiques tels qu'ils existent dans les trois pays mentionnes ci-dessus. Il en tire la conclusion qu'une bonne partie de la recherche relative a la presse s'articule trop autour des medias eux-memes, et ne se concentrent pas assez sur les forces economiques, les relations internationales, I'Etat. Les mouvements politiques et l'ensemble de la production culturelle.

Un changement d'orientation de la recherche dans la communication internationale pourrait se traduire par un effet d'attention accrue a certains genres d'etudes regionales. Un des traits nefastes des relations internationales depuis Glasnost est les querelles politiques reveillees par les identites ethniques et les nationalismes dans des regions s'etendant de certaines anciennes republiques sovietiques jusqu'au Moyen Qrient, et ailleurs. Le chercheur suedois. Joeran Carlsson (qui etudie les criteres de paix) affirme que des changements de mentalite chez les journalistes seront necessaires si l'on veut que les luttes regionales soient comprises et rapportees d'une facon satisfaisante. Il preconise une collaboration etroite entre ces chercheurs et des sociologues et des journalistes afin que ces etudes interdisciplinaires puissent aider a surmonter les difficultes complexes du reportage.

Les auteurs cites ci-dessus ont vise les conditions telles qu'elles existent dans diverses regions depuis le debut de la periode postglasnostienne. Alan Palmer examine la recherche faite et les defis lances aux theories issues d'une autre ere dite <>, c'est-a-dire le postmodernisme. Palmer fait ressortir a juste titre qu'il est tres difficile de definir le postmodernisme d'un point de vue theorique ou philosophique etant donne qu'il a marque de son sceau des domaines aussi varies que l'architecture, la litterature, la philosophie et bien d'autres encore. En depit de ou peut-etre a cause de son ouverture sur le monde, le post-modernisme pourrait offrir une position avantageuse d'ou l'on observerait les jeux combines et les effets reciproques intenses des cultures dans le monde. Alors que l'attention s'est surtout cristallisee autour de l'axe Est-Ouest, on constate depuis l'eclatement de l'union sovietique un changement de direction de cette contention. Les theories de la communication internationale ont de longue date incarne les valeurs liees aux pays occidentaux industrialises que ce soit dans leurs tentatives a regler les problemes poses par ces pays ou par leur facon de les envisager. L'affaire Salman Rushdie sous la plume critique de Palmer illustre d'une facon decisive certaines difficultes rencontrees par le monde occidentale dans l'interpretation d'evenements d'une origine culturelle eloignee. Il soumets au lecteur un certain nombre de suggestions dans la formulation de theories et pour la recherche, suggestions qui soulignent l'importance des cultures.

Les points de vue evoques dans ces communications ecrites ne representent que quelques-uns des sujets qui pourraient faire l'objet d'etudes plus approfondies de l'ere postglasnostienne. C'est moins la gamme des sujets abordes que leurs points communs qui peut etre d'un grand interet. Chacun d'eux indique explicitement et implicitement que l'interet porte aux luttes politiques mettant aux prises l'Est et l'Ouest a conduit les critiques a trop simplifier les recits lies aux processus sociaux dans beaucoup de pays en appreciant ces processus uniquement dans l'optique des relations Est-Ouest. D'autre part ces articles visent a illustrer la complexite des systemes sociaux dans lesquels les medias fonctionnent, et demandent aux systemes de communication de faire preuve d'une sensibilite accrue dans les domaines sociaux et culturels.

Nous tenons a exprimer notre reconnaissance a la revue electronique de communication qui a permis d'assembler ces articles, et aux critiques anonymes qui par leurs conseils judicieux et leurs suggestions utiles et pertinentes ont permis de mener a bien ces etudes.

Thomas Jacobson
State University of New York at Buffalo


Copyright 1994
Communication Institute for Online Scholarship, Inc.