Communication Institute for Online Scholarship
Communication Institute for Online
Scholarship Continous online service and innovation
since 1986
Site index
 
ComAbstracts Visual Communication Concept Explorer Tables of Contents Electronic Journal of Communication ComVista

EJC logo
The Electronic Journal of Communication / La Revue Electronique de Communication

Volume 13 Numbers 2 and 3, 2003


 

 

AFRICAN AMERICAN COMMUNICATION EXPERIENCES:

  A UNIQUE MOSAIC OF CONTEMPORARY SOCIAL LIFE

 

Editor/Editeur:

 

Anne Maydan Nicotera

Howard University

 

Introduction/Introduction

 

Anne Maydan Nicotera

Howard University

 

Snoop, Dig, and Resurrect:What Can Scholars of African American Communication Learn From the Tulsa Race Riot of 1921?/ Fouiller, fouiner, et  ressusciter: Que peuvent apprendre les lettrés américains de souche africaine en communication de l’émeute raciale de Tulsa en 1921?

 

Olga Idriss Davis

Arizona State University

 

African American First-Generation College Student Communicative Experiences/ La première génération d’étudiants universitaire américain d’origine africaine et leurs expériences communicatives.

 

Mark P. Orbe

Western Michigan University

 

Learning to Play the Game: An Exploratory Study of How African American Women and Men Interact With Others in Organizations/Apprendre à jouer le jeu: une étude exploratoire de la façon dont les hommes et les femmes américains d’origine africaine agissent envers d’autres gens dans les organizations.  

 

Denise Gates

Ohio University

 

Childhood Memories: The Link in the Chain African American Women’s Construction of Meaning From the Television Show Sisters/Mémoires d’enfance: le lien des femmes américaines d’origine africaine dans la recherche d’une signification à travers l’émission de télévision Sisters

 

Jennifer F. Wood

Xavier University

 

African American Female Small Group Communication: An Application of Group-as-a-Whole Theory/Les petits groupes de communication des femmes américaines d’origine africaine: Une application de théorie d’une pensée unique de groupe.

 

Laura Kathleen Dorsey

Morgan State University

 

Learning Leadership:  Communication, Resistance, and African American Women’s Executive Leadership Development/Apprendre le leadership : la communication, la résistance, et Le développement du leadership des femmes américaines d’origine africaine cadres.

 

Patricia S. Parker

The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

 

And Still I Rise: Communicative Resistance of African American Women in a Culturally Diverse Community/Et toujours j’aboutis: La résistance communicative des femmes américaines d’origine africaine dans une communauté culturelle diverse.

 

Patricia S. Hill

University of Akron

 

A Performance of Culture: Louis Farrakhan at the Million Man March/ Une performance de culture: Louis Farrakhan à la marche d’un million d’hommes

Jerome Dean Mahaffey

Indiana University East


 Editor's Introduction

African American communication experiences are rich and unique. The challenges and triumphs experienced by African Americans as members of society--i.e., developing and maintaining relationships, raising families, working, playing, consuming goods and services--form a complex web of issues stemming from structural, informal, cultural, and societal forces including, but not limited to, social constructions of race and gender. The field of communication is uniquely situated to provide a fertile ground for the compilation, discovery, and creation of knowledge related to explicating and understanding the communication experiences of African Americans. The dynamics of African American experiences are rich and complex--and cannot be explained by research conducted with Eurocentric approaches in predominantly European American systems. The experiences of African Americans are particularized, and modes of research that are culturally embedded solely in dominant culture meaning systems are inadequate to explore these phenomena.

 

The research contained in this special issue is but a sampling from a diverse population of interests among scholars of African American communication and culture.  First, in a critical analysis, Olga Idriss Davis examines the stories of survivors of the 1921 Tulsa Race Riot, revealing the performance of community and its powers of resistance, identity, and survival.   This article is presented first so as to set a tone for the study of African American communication and culture as historically situated and particularized.  The rich history and societal experiences of African Americans as a social group exist as a complex context of contemporary African American communicative life.  A meaningful understanding of African American communication and culture can only be obtained by scholars who are ever-mindful of this context. 

The next three articles explore interaction that occurs in the arena of dominant culture systems.  Mark P. Orbe examines the experiences of African American first-generation college students, illuminating the essence of this particularized experience.  Denise Gates explores organizational experiences of African American women and men, examining their day-to-day negotiation of their organizational lives.  Jennifer F. Wood analyzes how African American women construct meaning from a television drama with a predominantly White cast.  In so doing, she breaks the presumption that ethnicity is the primary "filter" for Black viewers, de-essentializing race as an explanatory factor in media consumption research. 

The next three articles focus on African American women particularly, concentrating on their interactive experiences.  Laura Kathleen Dorsey places the lived experiences of African American women at the center of her analysis, examining African American female small group communication in an application of a psychological behavioral theory.  This article serendipitously provides a context of African American women's culture for the next two articles, which examine African American women's communicative experiences outside their own particularized group.  Patricia S. Parker focuses on African American women's communicative experiences in dominant culture organizations, examining leadership development as revealed by the life histories of African American women who occupy upper-level executive positions in predominantly White organizational systems.  Patricia S. Hill focuses on African American women's communicative experiences in community life, exploring the communicative strategies of resistance employed by African American women residing in a culturally diverse community. 

The last article presented, Jerome Dean Mahaffey's rhetorical analysis of Louis Farrakhan's speech at the Million Man March, marks a departure from the interview-based studies presented previously.  At the same time, it is strategically presented last because it philosophically brings us full-circle; this analysis illustrates how African American rhetoric/communication is most fruitfully examined and understood from a viewpoint that is alternative from the "mainstream."  By taking an Afrocentric perspective, Mahaffey shows how critical judgments of the speech as "a failure" concluded such because their critical criteria are culturally mismatched to the rhetor, his audience, his setting, and his text.  He explicitly illustrates the very phenomenon that instigated my interest in this special issue: Scholarship that ignores the unique and complex cultural context of African American communication and culture inescapably draws flawed conclusions.  Only modes of research that are culturally sensitive to the meaning systems inherent in the human communication phenomena under study are adequate to explore these phenomena.

I would like to thank Teresa Harrison, the General Editor, for inviting me to edit this special issue of EJC/REC.  The experience has been rewarding and deeply edifying.  I wish to thank all who submitted manuscripts for their scholarship and what it brings to the field.  I am grateful to the authors whose work appears herein for their talent, patience, professionalism, and timeliness throughout the editorial process.  It was a joy working with each and every one.  Finally, I deeply appreciate the tireless work of the board of reviewers who provided the critique and commentary that helped to shape these articles as they appear.  I commend these interesting and insightful essays to the reader; please read with the knowledge that these articles can only begin to represent the richness and depth that exists in the burgeoning arena of research on African American communication and culture.

Introduction de l'éditeur

Les expériences de communication américaines de souche africaine sont riches et uniques. Les défis et les triomphes éprouvés par eux comme membres de société --par exemple, le développement et le maintien des rapports personnels, élever une famille, travailler, jouer, consommer des articles et des services-- forme une toile complexe de questions qui proviennent de structure, simple, culturel, et des forces sociales incluent, mais non limité aux constructions sociales de race et de sexe. Le champ de communication est uniquement situé pour fournir une terre fertile pour la compilation, la découverte, et la création de connaissance apparentée à l’explication et à la compréhension des expériences de communication américaines de souche africaine. La dynamique est riche et complexe--et ne peut être expliquée par des recherches dirigées par des approches centrées sur l’Europe dans des systèmes à prédominance européennes. Les expériences américaines de souche africaine sont particularisées, et les modes de recherche qui sont culturellement enfoncées uniquement dans des systèmes de sens de culture dominants sont inadéquats pour explorer ces phénomènes.

La recherche contenue dans cette publication n’est qu’un échantillon d'une population aux intérêts variés parmi les lettrés de communication et de culture américaine de souche africaine. Premièrement, dans une analyse critique, Olga Idriss Davis examine les histoires des survivants de l’émeute raciale de Tulsa en 1921, révélant la bonne performance de la communauté dans ses pouvoirs de résistance, d'identité, et de survie. Cet article est premièrement présenté afin de donner un ton particulier pour l'étude de la communication et de la culture d’américain de souche africaine et de la situé dans son contexte particulier et historique. L’histoire riche et les expériences de sociétés américaines de souche africaine comme groupe social existent dans un contexte complexe de vie communicative contemporaine. Une compréhension sérieuse de communication et de culture américaine de souche africaine ne peuvent être obtenues que par des lettrés qui sont attentifs à ce contexte.

Les trois prochains articles explorent l'interaction qui existe dans les systèmes de cultures dominants. Mark P. Orbe examine et montre ces expériences américaines de souche africaine d’étudiants d’université de première génération. Denise Gates explore les expériences organisationnelles d’hommes et de femmes américains de souche africaine, examinant leurs négociations quotidiennes dans leurs vies organisationnelles. Jennifer F. Wood analyse comment les femmes américaines de souche africaine déduisent le sens d'un drame de télévision avec des acteurs à prédominance blanche. Dans ce cas, elle casse la supposition que l’ethnicité est le "filtre" primaire pour les téléspectateurs Noirs, ne mettant pas la race comme facteur explicatif pour la recherche de consommation de presse.

Les trois prochains articles se concentrent sur les femmes américaines de souche africaine, en particulier sur leurs expériences interactives. Laura Kathleen Dorsey place les expériences vécues de ces femmes au centre de son analyse, examinant la communication de petit groupe de femmes américaines de souche africaine dans une application de théorie psychologique comportementale. Cet article fournit heureusement un contexte de culture pour ces femmes pour les deux prochains articles. Ces articles examinent les expériences communicatives des femmes américaines de souche africaine hors de la spécificité de leur propre groupe. Patricia S. Parker met l’accent sur les expériences communicatives de ces femmes dans des organisations à culture dominantes, examinant le développement de la direction ainsi révélé par les histoires de vie de ces femmes américaines de souche africaine qui occupent des positions d ‘exécutives dans des systèmes d’organisation à prédominance blanche. Patricia S. Hill se concentre sur des expériences communicatives de femmes américaines de souche africaine dans leur vie de communauté, explorant les stratégies communicatives de résistance employée par ces femmes résident dans une communauté culturellement diverse.

Le dernier article présenté, l'analyse rhétorique de Jerome Dean Mahaffey du discours de Louis Farrakhan au moment de la marche d’un million d'hommes, marque une cassure sur la façon dont les études basées sur des entretiens ont été présentées précédemment. En même temps, il est stratégiquement représenté en dernier parce qu'il nous apporte une fermeture philosophique; cette analyse illustre comment la rhétorique de communication américaine de souche africaine est mieux examinée et comprise d'un point de vue qui est alternatif au "courant principal." En prenant une perspective centrée sur l’Afrique, Mahaffey montre comment les jugements critiques du discours ont conclu à "un échec" du fait que leurs critères sont culturellement mal assortis à son éloquence, son auditoire, son montage, et à son texte. Il illustre explicitement le phénomène qui a créé mon intérêt pour cette revue: l'Erudition qui néglige le contexte unique et complexe de la communication et de la culture par des américains d’origine africaine qui dessine inéluctablement de fausses conclusions. Seul les façons de recherche qui sont culturellement sensible aux phénomènes de la communication humaine sont suffisant à l'étude pour les explorer.

J'aimerais remercier Teresa Harrison, l'Editeur Général, pour m’avoir inviter à éditer cette revue spéciale d'EJC/REC. L'expérience m’a récompensé et profondément édifier. Je souhaite remercier tout ce qui ont soumis des manuscrits pour leur érudition et pour ce qu'ils apportent à la profession. Je suis gré aux auteurs dont le travaille apparaît ici pour leur talent, leur patience, leur professionnalisme, et leur opportunité au travers du procédé éditorial. C'était une joie que de travailler avec chacun. Finalement, j'apprécie énormément le travail continuel des critiques qui ont fourni la critique et le commentaire qui a aidé à former ces articles comme ils apparaissent. Je recommande ces essais intéressants et perspicaces au lecteur; s'il vous plaît, lisez-les avec la connaissance que ces articles ne peuvent que commencer à représenter la richesse et l’acuité qui existe dans l'arène fleurissante des recherches sur la communication et la culture d’Américains de souche africaine.


Board of Reviewers

Brenda Allen, University of Colorado, Denver

Deborah F. Atwater, Pennsylvania State University

Carolyn Calloway-Thomas, Indiana University

Melbourne S. Cummings, Howard University

Jannette Dates, Howard University

Rhunette Diggs, Denison University

Tina M. Harris, University of Georgia

Marsha Houston, University of Alabama

Ronald L. Jackson II, Pennsylvania State University

Paula Matabane, Howard University

Carlos Morrison, Fort Valley State University

Teresa A. Nance, Villanova University

Mark P. Orbe, Western Michigan University

Patricia S. Parker, The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Jamey Piland, Trinity College

Cornelius B. Pratt, U.S. Department of Agriculture

James Rada, Howard University

Abhik Roy, Howard University

Richard Wright, Howard University

 

 


Snoop, Dig, and Resurrect:

What Can Scholars of African American Communication Learn

From the Tulsa Race Riot of 1921?

 

Olga Idriss Davis

Arizona State University

Abstract. The Tulsa Race Riot of 1921 has recently garnered much public awareness of the historical significance of the African American community at the turn of the 20th century. Engendering themes of economic empowerment, privilege and oppression, struggle and resistance, a look at the stories of survivors of one of the most heinous riots in American history illuminates the role of community as a performance of survival. The 1921 Tulsa Race Riot informs how survivors socially construct community in ways that resist a dominant discourse determined to obfuscate their identity. In addition, riot research poses new questions of philosophical, ethical, and cultural responsibility situating the researcher-scholar at the center of a historical continuum.

This essay critically explores how narrative discourse of Race Riot survivors informs a performance of community and offers future directions for African American communication scholarship. Framed within this context, African American communication experience offers a twofold query: “How does a performance of community illuminate the relationship between human communication and survival?” An additional query asks, “How does a narrative of struggle and resistance inform scholars of African American communication what work lies ahead in the 21st century?” To snoop, dig, and resurrect suggests that the study of discourse from the tradition of African American communication is a study of the legacy of survival.

Fouiller, fouiner, et  ressusciter: Que peuvent apprendre les lettrés américains de souche africaine en communication de l’émeute raciale de Tulsa en 1921? L’émeute raciale de Tulsa en 1921 a récemment eu une prise de conscience de la part du public quand à son importance historique pour les communautés américaine d’origine africaine à la fin du 20e siècle. L’engendrement de thèmes d’indépendance économique, de privilège et d’oppression, de lutte et de résistance, offrent un regard sur les survivants d’une des émeutes les plus atroces de l’histoire américaine et éclaire le rôle de la communauté comme membre d’aide à la survie. L’émeute raciale de Tulsa en 1921 nous informe de la façon dont les survivants ont construit une communauté sociale qui résista au discours dominant déterminé à obscurcir leur identité. De plus, les recherches sur les émeutes posent de nouvelles questions philosophiques, d’éthiques, et de responsabilités culturelles plaçant l’érudit et le chercheur au centre de cette continuité historique.

Cet essai explore de façon critique le discours narratif des survivants de l’émeute raciale, et nous informe des performances de la communauté ainsi que d’une direction future pour les bourses de communication pour les Américains d’origine africaine. Dans ce contexte, l’expérience de communication offre une question à deux battants: ‘comment une performance par la communauté peut illuminer la relation entre la communication humaine et la survie ?’ Une deuxième question pose le problème suivant :’comment le récit de lutte et de résistance fait savoir aux érudits américains d’origine africaine de communication ce qui les attend au 21ème siècle ?’ Fouiller, fouiner, et ressusciter suggèrent que l’étude du discours à travers une tradition américaine d’origine africaine de communication soit en fait une étude de survie.


African American First-Generation College Student Communicative Experiences

 

Mark P. Orbe

Western Michigan University

Abstract. Since the 1920s, first-generation college (FGC) students have been enrolling in US colleges and universities in increasing numbers, yet little is known about their communicative experiences. The limited research that does exist offers generalizations that really offer no practical guidance given the great heterogeneity of FGC students. This phenomenological inquiry draws from the communicative experiences of 29 different African American FGC students in order to provide insight into intersections of race, family educational background, communication, and college survival/success. Based on a thematic analysis of focus group transcripts, four essential themes were identified: Going to college, self-talk, communicating with (at) home, and communicating on campus. Multiple points of analysis are provided within each of these themes as a means to capture the essence of what it is like to be an African American FGC student in the 21st century. A discussion of the study’s findings, as well as implications for future research, is also provided.

La première génération d’étudiants universitaire américain d’origine africaine et leurs expériences communicatives. Depuis les années 20, la première génération d’étudiants universitaire s’est inscrite dans les universités et les collèges en nombre grandissant, bien que très peu soit connut de leurs expériences communicatives. Le peu de recherche qui existe offre des généralisations qui n’apporte pas d’information pratique malgré la grande hétérogénéité des étudiants de première génération. Cette demande phénoménologique se base sur les expériences communicatives de 29 étudiants de première génération universitaire américaine d’origine africaine afin d’avoir des idées sur les croisements de races, les antécédents éducationnels familiale, la communication, et le taux de succès universitaire. Basé sur une analyse de groupes par thème, quatre thèmes majeurs ont été identifiés : aller à l’université, se parler, communiquer à la maison, et communiquer sur le campus. Plusieurs points d’analyses sont donnés à l’intérieur de chaque thème afin de bien comprendre ce qu’être étudiant de première génération universitaire américaine d’origine africaine au 21ème siècle représente. Une discussion des trouvailles de cette étude, ainsi que les implications pour des recherches futures, est aussi incluse. 


Learning to Play the Game: An Exploratory Study of How African American

Women and Men Interact With Others in Organizations

 

Denise Gates

Ohio University

Abstract. Utilizing feminist standpoint theory, this exploratory study examines the ways in which African American women and men experience organizations. Based on analysis of interviews with nine individuals, the study describes interpersonal interactions of African Americans with one another and with members of other co-cultural groups as well as with members of dominant groups. The study identifies communication tactics employed by the African Americans interviewed to successfully negotiate their places in organizations. The study concludes by offering ideas for future research.

Apprendre à jouer le jeu: une étude exploratoire de la façon dont les hommes et les femmes américains d’origine africaine agissent envers d’autres gens dans les organizations. En utilisant la théorie de croyance féministe, cette étude exploratoire examine les façons dont les hommes et les femmes américains d’origine africaine ressentent les organisations. Basé sur une analyse d’entretiens avec neuf personnes, cette étude décrit les relations interpersonnelles entre eux, avec d’autres membres de groupes culturellement similaires, ainsi qu’avec des membres des groupes dominants. Cette étude identifie les tactiques de communication employées par ces américains d’origine africaine qui ont réussi à négocier leur place dans les organisations. Cette étude se termine en offrant des idées pour de futures recherches. 


Childhood Memories: The Link in the Chain

African American Women’s Construction of Meaning

From the Television Show Sisters

 

Jennifer F. Wood

Xavier University

Abstract. The meaning and identities of African Americans often are reduced to economic and demographic indicators of media consumption habits. Such indicators do not explain or describe the complexity of meanings produced within African American experiences of media. This exploratory study examines how African American women construct meaning from the predominantly white cast television drama, Sisters (NBC, 1991-1996). Patricia Hill Collins’ (1990) Black feminist thought, John Fiske's (1987) theory of intertextuality and Stuart Hall’s (1980) encoding/decoding model provide a theoretical framework. The study focuses on a preference-based appointment show and uses reception analysis based in cultural studies. The six African American female participants constructed meaning through the use of the "think-backs" and the childhood memories served as a prominent point of negotiation between the African-American women and the ideology of the text. Thus, for this particular television program, the women relied on the child-based “think-back” technique—not their ethnicity—to link them to the primary text.

Mémoires d’enfance: le lien des femmes américaines d’origine africaine dans la recherche d’une signification à travers l’émission de télévision Sisters. Le sens et l’identité des américains d’origine africaine sont souvent réduit aux indicateurs économiques et démographiques des médias concernant leurs habitudes de consommation. Ces indicateurs n’expliquent pas ou ne décrivent pas la complexité des différentes significations produites à l’intérieur même des expériences de média. Cette étude exploratoire examine comment les femmes américaines d’origine africaine construisent une pensée individuelle lorsqu’elles regardent les actrices à majorité blanche de l’émission de télévision Sisters (NBC, 1991-1996). Patricia Hill Collins’ (1990) Black Feminist Thought, John Fiske’s (1987) theory of intertextuality et Stuart Hall’s (1980) encoding/decoding model nous offrent un cadre théorique. Cette étude se concentre sur l’émission de télévision en tant que lieu préférentiel pour les actrices et utilise les analyses de réception basées sur les études culturelles. Les six femmes américaines d’origine africaine participants à cette étude se sont construit une réalité en utilisant la ‘pensée en enfance’ et comment ces souvenirs enfantins ont servi de points forts entre ces femmes et l’idéologie du texte. Ainsi, pour cette spécifique émission de télévision, les femmes se sont basées principalement sur la technique de la ‘pensée en enfance’ –et non leur ethnicité- pour les aider à faire le raccord au texte primaire.


African American Female Small Group Communication:

An Application of Group-as-a-Whole Theory

 

Laura Kathleen Dorsey

Morgan State University

 

Abstract. The present article seeks to understand African American female small group communication using Group-as-a-Whole Theory, a psychological behavioral theory.  This work places the lived experience of African American women at the center for analysis.  An exploratory research question guided this article.  Data for this study was gathered via a two-hour focus group session where eight African American women and an African American female moderator gathered to discuss small group communication among African American women in an informal, but guided, way.  Data analysis of this focus group session drew upon the tacit knowledge of the primary researcher as an African American woman and both expert-observation by the primary researcher and an additional non-participant observer to uncover the unconscious group-as-a-whole dynamics between the research participants. Thematic issues of inclusion and exclusion and the longing for more connection and relationship with African American men emerged from an interpretive analysis of the data.  It is concluded that these primary findings uniquely help communication scholars understand what both the process and context of small group communication offers African American women. This article concludes with recommendations for future research on African American female small group communication.

Les petits groupes de communication des femmes américaines d’origine africaine: Une application de théorie d’une pensée unique de groupe. Cet article cherche à comprendre le processus de communication de petit groupe de femmes américaines d’origine africaine en utilisant la théorie d’une pensée unique. Ce travail place l’expérience vécue des femmes américaines d’origine africaine au centre de cette analyse. Cette question de recherche exploratoire guida cet article dans sa forme présente. Les données pour cette étude ont été assemblées à travers des séances de deux heures où huit femmes en plus d’une présidente, toutes américaines d’origine africaine, se sont retrouvées pour discuter de la communication en petits groupes de façon informelle mais avec une direction précise. L’analyse d’information de ce groupe vient de la connaissance par la chercheuse américaine d’origine africaine grâce à ses observations et à ses connaissances du sujet. Une autre personne qui ne faisait pas partie du groupe était présente afin de découvrir la dynamique de l’inconscient du groupe. Les thèmes d’inclusions et d’exclusions ainsi que le désir d’avoir de meilleur rapport avec les hommes américains d’origine africaine sont apparues avec une interprétation analytique des données.  Il a été conclu que ces recherches primaires aidaient les érudits de la communication à comprendre ce que le processus et le contexte offrent aux femmes américaines d’origine africaine dans la communication des petits groupes. Cet article conclut avec des recommandations pour de future recherche sur ce sujet.


Learning Leadership:  Communication, Resistance, and

African American Women’s Executive Leadership Development

 

Patricia S. Parker

The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

 

Abstract. This article examines leadership development as revealed in the life histories of 15 African American women who have attained upper level executive positions within large, hierarchical, predominantly White organizations in the United States (dominant culture organizations). Executive leadership development is viewed as a socialization process beginning in early childhood that encompasses both leadership development and organizational socialization. A standpoint feminist framework is used to call attention to the ways marginalized groups, such as African American girls and women, resist the discourses and institutional arrangements that reproduce “outsider status” in the socialization process. Four themes emerged as salient in the women’s narratives about their development as organizational leaders, (a) childhood: education, race, and identity matter, (b) high school: fighting discourses of outsider status, (c) college/early career: resisting controlling identities of strangeness and uppity-ness, and (d) career ascent: strategies for remaining self-defined.

 

Apprendre le leadership : la communication, la résistance, et Le développement du leadership des femmes américaines d’origine africaine cadres. Cet article examine le développement du rôle de leader révélé à travers l’histoire de quinze femmes américaines d’origine africaine qui ont réussi à avoir des positions élevées dans de grandes compagnies à prédominances blanches aux Etat-Unis. Le développement du rôle de leader est vu comme un processus de socialisation qui commence dès l’enfance et qui comprend le développement du leader ainsi que la socialisation à l’intérieur de la compagnie. Un point de vue féministe est utilisé afin de souligner la façon dont les groupes sont marginalisés, tels que ces femmes et filles américaines d’origine africaine, qui résistent aux discours et aux croyances des compagnies qui reproduisent leur statut d’étrangère dans le procédé de socialisation. Quatre thèmes majeurs sortent de ces femmes dans leur développement en tant que dirigeante d’entreprise, (a) l’enfance : l’éducation, la race, et l’identité sont importantes, (b) le lycée : se battre contre leur statut d’étrangère, (c) l’université/le début d’une carrière : résister l’identité d’être marginalisée et prétentieuse, et (d) l’aboutissement en carrière : les stratégies pour rester fidèle à sa pensée.

 


And Still I Rise: 

Communicative Resistance of African American

Women in a Culturally Diverse Community

 

Patricia S. Hill

University of Akron

 

Abstract. Black feminist theory informed an exploration of communicative strategies of resistance engaged by 25 African American women residing in a culturally diverse community.  Analysis of the qualitatively collected material suggests respondents utilize many different dimensions of empowerment in the context of everyday life, as revealed in two emergent themes: (1) Resistance by Impression Management; and (2) Resistance as Community Othermothers. These themes are considered salient to the unique circumstances and communicative experiences of these women in their community context. 

 

Et toujours j’aboutis: La résistance communicative des femmes américaines d’origine africaine dans une communauté culturelle diverse. La théorie féministe noire nous informe d’une stratégie de résistance communicative commencée par 25 femmes américaines d’origine africaine qui habitent dans une communauté culturelle diverse. L’analyse du matériel accumulé suggère que les personnes interrogées utilisent une vaste étendue d’autorité dans le contexte de la vie quotidienne selon les deux prochains thèmes : (1) La résistance par la croyance de direction ; et (2) La résistance de la communauté des mères. Ces thèmes sont considérés saillant à cause de leurs circonstances uniques ainsi que par les expériences communicatives de ces femmes dans le contexte de leur communauté.


A Performance of Culture: Louis Farrakhan at the Million Man March

Jerome Dean Mahaffey

Indiana University East

 

Abstract: American journalists and pundits criticized Louis Farrakhan’s speech at the Million Man March as “loopy” and “rambling” even though it augmented his image among African Americans. Was the speech really incoherent? And if not, what function did it accomplish? This essay performs a rhetorical analysis of “Toward a More Perfect Union,” attempting to account for the divergent reactions to the speech and explore its intended function. The lengthy speech demonstrates threads of coherency and shows Farrakhan to be a competent orator who, through the “pledge of atonement” in the speech’s conclusion, attempted to transform his audience by promoting a preferred version of Black masculinity drawn from the African American cultural repository.

 

Une performance de culture: Louis Farrakhan à la marche d’un million d’hommes. Les journalistes Américains et les experts ont critiqués le discours de Louis Farrakhan lors de la marche d’un million d’hommes comme étant « cinglé » et « décousu » bien que ce discours ai amélioré l’image de marque de Farrakhan auprès des américains d’origine africaine. Est-ce que ce discours était vraiment incohérent ? Et si la réponse est non, quelle fonction aurait-il rempli ? Cet essai donne une analyse rhétorique sur « le chemin d’une meilleure union », en essayant de prendre en compte les réactions diverses vis-à-vis du discours et en essayant de comprendre son but voulu. Le long discours prouve certaines cohérences et montre Farrakhan comme un orateur capable qui, à travers le « gage d’expiation » à la conclusion de son discours, a essayé de transformer son audience en promouvant la version préférée de la masculinité Noire prise du répertoire culturel américain d’origine africaine.


Copyright 2003 Communication Institute for Online Scholarship, Inc.

This file may not be publicly distributed or reproduced without written permission of the Communication Institute for Online Scholarship, P.O. Box 57, Rotterdam Jct., NY 12150 USA (phone: 518-887-2443).