Communication Institute for Online Scholarship
Communication Institute for Online
Scholarship Continous online service and innovation
since 1986
Site index
 
ComAbstracts Visual Communication Concept Explorer Tables of Contents Electronic Journal of Communication ComVista

Electronic Journal of Communication Untitled Document
EJC logo
The Electronic Journal of Communication / La Revue Electronique de Communication

Volume 12 Numbers 1 & 2, 2002


A DIGITAL DIVIDE? FACTS AND EXPLANATIONS

----

FRACTURE NUMERIQUE ? FAITS ET EXPLICATIONS

Editor/Editeur:

 

Jan van Dijk

University of Twente

Guest Editor

Introduction/Introduction

Jan van Dijk

University of Twente


A framework for digital divide research


Jan van Dijk

University of Twente


The Digital Divide in the Netherlands: The influence of material, cognitive and social resources on the possession and use of ICTs/ Fracture numérique aux Pays-Bas:  L'influence des ressources matérielles, cognitives et sociales sur la possession et l'utilisation des TIC (ICTs)


Jos de Haan

Social and Cultural Planning Agency: The Netherlands


Susanne Rijken

Utrecht University

The Digital Divide in South Korea Closing and Widening Divides in the 1990s/ Fracture Numerique En Coree du sud Disparition et Croissance  dans les années   90


Han Woo Park
Yeung Nam University

The Effects of Computer Anxiety and Communication Apprehension on the Adoption and Utilization of the Internet/ Les Effets d’anxiété d’ordinateur et les troubles d’appréhension de communication dans l’adoption et l’utilisation de l’Internet.


Steven C. Rockwell
University of South Alabama


Loy Singleton
University of Alabama

A Digital Divide in Maryland Public Schools/Fracture Numerique Dans les Ecoles Publiques de l’etat du Maryland

 

Jacqueline A. Nunn.

Robert S. Kadel
Johns Hopkins University

 

Allison Eaton-Kawecki Karpyn
University of Pennsylvania



EJC/REC Staff:

Managing Editor:
Teresa Harrison
Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute

French Editor:
Lucien Gerber
Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute

Editorial Assistant:
Terrell Neuage
University at Albany


ELECTRONIC JOURNAL OF COMMUNICATION
LA REVUE ELECTRONIQUE DE COMMUNICATION


Volume 12 Numbers 1 & 2, 2002


Editor's Introduction

Presently, heated discussions are going in America and Europe, in particular, about the question whether there is a so-called ‘digital divide’ or not. And when it is deemed to exist, the next question is whether it will close or widen in years to come. Most of this discussion is politically charged. Solid scientific research and analysis are scarce. In the mean time data of official statistics are beginning to appear, like those of the US Census Bureau, summarized in the NTIA’s reports Falling through the Net I, II , III and IV and A Nation Online, the Eurobarometer and United Nations Development Reports. However, research and analysis based on these resources and other primarily descriptive statistics is inadequate for the following reasons:

·        They only report the usual, rather shallow demographics of income, education, age, sex, race and ethnicity; the deeper social, cultural and psychological causes of the lack of access of particular categories do not come to the surface.

·        Lack of longitudinal data prohibits the extrapolation of trends, a necessity for the interpretation of any digital divide. Too often the development of a simple S-curve of adoption is presupposed.

·        The multifaceted concept of access is ill-defined. Most often it is limited to material access: the possession of a computer or network connection. Access in terms of skills, usability and actual use is underexposed.

·        There is a clear lack of theory. Insufficient attempts of explanation by specific models of variables related to different kinds of access, multivariate analysis or by general theories of information inequality in an information society.

·        There is a predominance of sociological and economic distinctions while contributions of communication studies and psychology are rare. Still, social and media networks, public opinion, attitudes towards technology and innovation, the communication of usage styles and many other factors are vital for any diffusion.

In this special issue of the EJC/RCE the authors will contribute to the filling of these gaps. There is multivariate analysis of potential causes of inequalities observed. There are longitudinal data. And there are contributions from communication studies and psychology, for instance elaborating the concepts of computer anxiety and communication apprehension.

In their contribution The Digital Divide in the Netherlands, Jos de Haan and Suzanne Rijken distinguish between the possession, skills and use of ICTs. They carefully analyse the respective weight of a number of background variables for these types of access. Their study shows that usage differences are smaller than the differences in possession. However, they also observe that differences in usage (frequency and above all type of usage) remain once the ICT products described have become widely distributed. This calls for a more complex picture of the digital divide than a mere look at access in the meaning of hardware possession and network connection. The authors have made this picture by systematically comparing differences in access, use and digital skills.

Han Woo Park has reached a comparable conclusion in The Digital Divide in South Korea: Closing and Widening Divides in the 1990s. Hardware possession and connection are improving, but the skills needed to use them and the usage opportunities in themselves are lagging behind. In 2001 four out of five Korean households possessed personal computers and 64.9 percent used the Internet. These figures match those in Northern America and Northern Europe. They were realized by persistent policies of technological diffusion by the Korean government and business world. However, insufficient digital skills and scanty usage opportunities remain among the Korean people. It is argued that they lead to new forms of digital divide. In particular, gaps in digital skills and usage appear. In any case this means that a technology push is not capable of closing all digital divides.

Usually, the adoption of new technologies is seen as a continuous upward movement. However, in this issue Steven Rockwell and Loy Singleton claim that one-third of US-homes is expected to reject the particular technology of ICT. And even after they have adopted it purchasing a computer or getting an Internet connection in one way or another, a large number of drop-outs appears. Their study suggests that psychological barriers such as computer anxiety and communication apprehension might offer some insight into the reasons of this rejection.

The last article in this issue stresses the remaining importance as a necessary condition of having computers and Internet connections, in this case in public schools. In A Digital Divide in Maryland Public Schools, Jacqueline Nunn, Robert Kadel and Allison Eaton-Kawecki show that schools having less access to computers and the Internet not only reveal less use of this technology by students and teachers for general and specific school tasks. They also show less proficiency among teachers in using this technology and less integration into instruction. One does not have to claim that digital technology improves education, to acknowledge that this means unequal access to opportunities anyway.

As an introduction to this issue the guest-editor provides a framework for digital divide research. He tries to make a number of conceptual clarifications. First of all the pitfalls of the metaphor called digital divide are explained. Then he distinguishes four types of access: mental, material, skills and usage access. He arranges them in a model of successive types of access. Finally, he describes aspects of a future agenda of digital divide research presenting a comprehensive causal model of causes and effects of these types of access to be tested in the years ahead.  

Fracture Numérique? Faits et explications

Préface de L’éditeur. Actuellement, des débats houleux ont lieu en Amérique et en Europe,  en particulier,  à  propos de ce qu’on a convenu d’appeler fracture numérique  (digital divide) et quand on pense qu’elle existe, la prochaine question que tout le monde se pose est de savoir si elle va disparaître ou si l’écart va continuer de se creuser dans les prochaines années. La majeure partie de cette discussion se déroule sur un ton politique. De sérieuses  recherches et analyses scientifiques  sont rares. Pendant ce temps,  les données des statistiques officielles commencent à apparaître, comme celles du bureau de recensement des Etats-Unis, récapitulées dans les rapports  NTIA.s intitulées  Net I, II, III et IV et A Nation Online, l'Eurobarometer et les rapports de développement des Nations Unies. Cependant, les recherches et les analyses basées sur ces sources et d'autres statistiques principalement descriptives sont insatisfaisantes pour les raisons suivantes:

  ·        Elles rapportent seulement les causes habituelles, plutôt superficielles ayant trait au revenu  démographique, à l'éducation, à l'âge,  au sexe,  à la race et à l'appartenance ethnique; les vraies raisons sociales, culturelles et psychologiques  du manque d'accès de certaines catégories particulières ne voient jamais le jour.

  ·        L’absence de données longitudinales interdit l'extrapolation des tendances, une nécessité pour l'interprétation d’une fracture numérique. Très souvent l’adoption du  développement d'une simple courbe en s  est présupposée.

  ·        Le concept d’accès a plusieurs facettes, est mal défini. Le plus souvent il est limité à l'accès matériel: la possession d'un ordinateur ou  connexion de réseau. L’accès en termes de qualifications, rentabilité et d’utilisation réelle n’est pas dévoilé.

·        Il y a une absence clair de théorie. Les tentatives insuffisantes de l'explication par les modèles spécifiques des variables se sont reliées à différentes sortes d'accès, analyse multivariable ou par des théories générales d'inégalité de l'information dans une société de l'information.

·        Il y a une prédominance des distinctions sociologiques et économiques  alors que les contributions des études de communication et de psychologie sont rares. Cependant, les réseaux sociaux et de médias, l'opinion publique, les attitudes envers la technologie et l'innovation, la communication des modèles d'utilisation et beaucoup d'autres facteurs sont essentiels pour n'importe quelle diffusion.

Dans cette édition spéciale de l'EJC/RCE les auteurs contribueront à combler  ces lacunes. Il y a une analyse multivariable des causes potentielles des inégalités observées. Il y a des données longitudinales. Et il y a des contributions des  études en communication et en  psychologie, par exemple élaborant les concepts d’anxiété liée à l'ordinateur et l'appréhension de communication.

Dans leur étude sur la fracture numérique aux pays-bas, Jos de Haan et Suzanne Rijken font la distinction entre la possession, les qualifications et l'utilisation des TIC  (ICTs.)  Ils analysent soigneusement le poids respectif d'un certain nombre de variables de fond pour ces types d'accès. Leur étude prouve que les différences d'utilisation sont plus petites que les différences en possession. Cependant, ils observent également que les différences dans l'utilisation (fréquence et surtout type d'utilisation) demeurent une fois les produits des TIC (ICT décrits  ont été  largement distribués. Ceci réclame une image plus complexe de la fracture numérique  que d’un simple regard à l'accès dans la signification de possession de matériel et de connexion de réseau. Les auteurs ont produit cette image en comparant systématiquement  les différences dans l'accès, l'utilisation et les qualifications numériques.

Han Woo Park  est arrivé à une conclusion semblable dans son article intitulé Fracture Numérique  en Corée du sud: Disparition et  croissance d’une fracture dans les années 1990.  Il y a  eu du progrès au niveau de la possession des matériels et des moyens de connexion  mais les connaissances requises pour leur utilisation traînent le pas.  En 2001, quatre  sur cinq foyers coréens possédaient un ordinateur et 64.9% utilisaient Internet. Ces chiffres sont semblables à ceux de l’Amérique  et de l’Europe du nord. Ces chiffres ont été atteints grâce à une politique persistante de diffusion technologique de la part du gouvernement et du monde d’affaires coréen.  Cependant, les qualifications (aptitudes) numériques restent insuffisantes et les chances  d'utilisation demeurent faibles parmi les Coréens. Il est soutenu que ceci mène à de nouvelles formes de fracture numérique. En particulier,  l’émergence d’écart entre les qualifications (aptitudes) numériques et l’utilisation. De toute façon ceci prouve qu’une campagne (effort)  technologique n’est pas capable de faire disparaître toutes les fractures numériques.

D'habitude, on voit l'adoption de nouvelles technologies comme un mouvement  continu de progrès. Cependant, dans cette question  (publication)  Steven Rockwell et  Loy Singleton  prétendent que l'on s'attend à  ce qu’un tiers des foyers américains  rejette particulièrement les technologies des TIC  (ICT.)  Et même après qu'ils les aient adoptées, même après l’achat  d’un ordinateur ou  après une obtention d'une Connexion à Internet,  d'une manière ou d'une autre, un grand nombre de rejets apparaissent. Leur étude suggère que des barrières psychologiques comme l'anxiété d’ordinateur et l'appréhension de communication puissent offrir un peu de compréhension (d'idée) dans les raisons de ce rejet.

 Le dernier article dans cette question (publication) souligne  l’importance   d'avoir des ordinateurs et des Connexions à Internet, dans ce cas dans les écoles publiques. Dans  leur article intitulé  Fracture Numérique  dans les Écoles  Publiques du Maryland,  Jacqueline Nunn, Robert Kadel et Allison Eaton-Kawecki montrent que les écoles ayant moins d'accès aux ordinateurs et l'Internet révèlent non seulement moins d'utilisation de cette technologie par les élèves et les enseignants pour des tâches scolaires générales et spécifiques. Ils montrent aussi moins de compétence parmi les enseignants dans l'utilisation de cette technologie et moins d'intégration dans l'instruction. On ne doit pas prétendre (affirmer) que la technologie numérique améliore l'éducation, pour reconnaître de toute façon que ceci signifie l'accès inégal aux chances.

Comme une introduction à cette question (publication) l’éditeur hôte fournit une structure pour des recherches sur la fracture numérique. Il essaie de faire un certain nombre de clarifications conceptuelles. Tout d'abord les pièges de la métaphore  appelée fracture numérique sont expliqués.  Puis  il fait la distinction entre  quatre moyens d'accès : mental, matériel (substantiel), habiletés (compétences) et accès d'utilisation. Il les arrange dans un modèle de types successifs d'accès.   Finalement, il décrit des aspects de recherches d'un ordre du jour (futur) de  fracture numérique présentant un modèle causal complet (compréhensif) de causes et d’effets de ces types d'accès qui vont être évalués dans les années à venir.


The Digital Divide in the Netherlands: The influence of material, cognitive and social resources on the possession and use of ICTs 

Jos de Haan
Social and Cultural Planning Agency: The Netherlands

Susanne Rijken
Utrecht University

Abstract. In the Netherlands, like in other western countries, one observes social inequality in the possession and use of information and communication technology (ICT) and in digital skills. This digital divide between the information rich (such as whites, those with higher incomes, those more educated, and dual-parent households) and the information poor (such as certain minorities, those with lower incomes and lower education levels, and single-parent households) is part of a diffusion process. Some people take the lead, others follow. This paper addresses the mechanisms behind different kinds of digital inequality within households (possession, skills and use). The explanation of the differences between sections of the population focuses on the possession of three types of resources: material, social and cognitive resources. Differences in ICT access and use between population groups can sometimes be explained completely and sometimes only partly. Some resources primarily influence possession, while others mainly influence ICT use or digital skills.


Fracture numérique aux Pays-Bas:  L'influence des ressources matérielles, cognitives et sociales sur la possession et l'utilisation des TIC[1] (ICTs). Aux Pays-Bas, comme dans d'autres pays occidentaux, on observe l'inégalité sociale dans la possession et l'utilisation des technologies de l'information et des communications (les TIC en anglais ICTs) et dans les qualifications numériques.  Cette fracture numérique entre ceux qu’on appelle les riches de l'information (comme les blancs, ceux qui ont les revenus les plus élevés, les ménages les plus instruits, et les familles nucléaires) et les pauvres de l'information (certaines minorités, ceux qui ont des revenus et niveaux d'éducation les plus bas, et les familles monoparentales) font partie d'un processus  de diffusion. Certaines personnes prennent le devant, et d'autres ne font que suivre. Cet article traite des mécanismes derrière différents genres d'inégalité numérique au sein des ménages (possession, qualifications et utilisation.) L'explication des différences entre les groupes de population se concentre sur la possession de trois types de ressources: les ressources matérielles, sociales et cognitives. Les différences dans l'accès et l'utilisation Des TiC (ICTs) entre les groupes de population peuvent quelquefois être expliquées complètement ou en partie. Certaines ressources influencent principalement la possession, alors que d'autres influencent surtout l'utilisation des TIC ou les qualifications numériques.


The Digital Divide in South Korea Closing and Widening Divides in the 1990s.

Han Woo Park
Yeung Nam University

 

Abstract. This article examines the closing and widening of digital divides in South Korea during the 1990s. The results indicate that mental (among others motivational) and material access to new digital technologies has been growing substantially in this decade. This was promoted by persistent policies of the Korean government and business world. Opposed to that, insufficient digital skills and scanty usage opportunities remain among the Korean people. It is argued that they lead to new forms of digital divide. In particular, gaps in digital skills and usage appear centering around traditional demographic variables such as, age or occupational status.

Fracture Numerique En Coree du sud Disparition et Croissance  dans les années 90. Cet article analyse la disparition et la croissance de la fracture numérique en Corée du sud pendant les années 90. Les résultats indiquent que les Motivations mentales (parmi tant d’autres) et l'accès matériel à de nouvelles technologies numériques s'était développé sensiblement pendant cette décennie. Ceci a été favorisé par d’enormes  efforts  de la part du gouvernement  et du monde d’affaires coréen.  Malgré cela, les qualifications numériques restent insuffisantes et les chances d'utilisation parmi les Coréens demeurent  maigres. Il est témoigné qu’une telle situation  mène à de nouvelles formes de fracture numérique. En particulier, les lacunes  entre les qualifications numériques et l'utilisation semblent se concentrer  sur des variables démographiques traditionnelles comme, l'âge ou le statut professionnel.


The Effects of Computer Anxiety and Communication Apprehension on the Adoption and Utilization of the Internet

Steven C. Rockwell
 University of South Alabama

Loy Singleton
University of Alabama

Abstract. Even while the cost of Internet access continues to drop, one-third of U.S. homes are expected to reject this technology.  This study suggests that psychological barriers such as computer anxiety and communication apprehension might offer some insight into the reasons for this rejection.  Internet usage patterns of 249 survey respondents were monitored for a one-year period.  Results suggest that those with high levels of computer anxiety are less likely to use the Internet at all while those with high levels of communication apprehension reported that they were less likely to use Internet services that involve interpersonal communication.  Further, the results suggest that experience with the Internet appears to increase the amount of time spent on-line.  The implications of these findings for policy makers are discussed.

Les Effets d’anxiété d’ordinateur et les troubles d’appréhension de communication dans l’adoption et l’utilisation de l’Internet. Alors que le coût d'accès d'Internet continue à chuter, on s'attend à ce qu'un tiers des foyers des Etats-Unis rejette cette technologie. Cette étude suggère que les barrières psychologiques telles que l'anxiété de  l'ordinateur et l'appréhension de communication pourraient offrir une idée  des raisons de ce rejet. Selon un sondage des  habitudes d’utilisation d’Internet de 249 personnes  qui ont été étudiées  pendant une période d’un an.  Les résultats suggèrent que les personnes qui ont un taux  élevé d’anxiété d'ordinateur n’étaient pas du tout disposées à utiliser l'Internet.  Tandis que  celles qui avaient  un taux  élevé d'appréhension de communication ont répondu qu'elles étaient moins disposées à utiliser les services d'Internet qui impliquent la communication interpersonnelle. Les résultats suggèrent par ailleurs que l'expérience avec l'Internet semble augmenter la quantité de temps passée en ligne. Les implications de ces résultats  sont discutées pour les autorités compétentes.


A Digital Divide in Maryland Public Schools 

Jacqueline A. Nunn
Robert S. Kadel
Johns Hopkins University 

Allison Eaton-Kawecki Karpyn
University of Pennsylvania

 

Abstract. In education one of the meanings of the term digital divide is that some students may be at a disadvantage if the technology available to them is limited because of their own personal funds or because of their school's funds.  Students and schools that have the financial advantages to provide technological resources and provide for their use would likely fare better in future educational, social, and economic (i.e., employment) competitions as American society becomes increasingly dependent on technology.  This paper uses data from the 2000 Maryland Technology Inventory to analyze the relationships among socio-economic status (measured as the percent of students within a school eligible for free or reduced meal costs), technology infrastructure within the school, student and teacher/administrator use of technology, and teacher proficiency in technology.  Our aim is to provide evidence of a digital divide in Maryland's public schools in an effort to assist educators, policy makers, and concerned citizens on how best to combat its negative effects on students' future prospects.  Through analyses of the Technology Inventory data, we find that schools with higher poverty levels have less access to computers and the Internet, less use of technology by students and teachers/administrators (in general and for specific tasks), and less proficiency among teachers in using computers, the Internet, and in integrating technology into instruction. 

Fracture Numerique Dans les Ecoles Publiques de l’etat du Maryland. Dans le domaine de l’éducation, une des significations du terme fracture numérique (digital divide) est que certains élèves peuvent être dans une position défavorable si la technologie à leur disposition est limitée par leurs propres moyens financiers ou par ceux de leur école. Les élèves et écoles ayant des atouts financiers et des ressources technologiques à leur disposition ont probablement beaucoup plus de chance de réussite sur les plans scolaire, social et économique (emploi)dans la vie à cause de la dépendance technologique de la société américaine. Cet article se base sur les données du bilan technologique 2000 du Maryland pour analyser les rapports socio économique( le taux d’élèves ayant droit aux repas gratuits ou subventionnés), l’infrastructure technologique au sein de l’école, l’usage technologique par élève et enseignant/ personnel, et les compétences(qualifications) de l’enseignant en technologie. Notre but est de donner la preuve de l’existence d’une fracture numérique au sein des écoles publiques du Maryland pour aider les enseignants, les autorités compétentes et les citoyens pour mieux lutter contre ses effets néfastes sur le devenir des élèves. Les résultats des analyses des données du bilan technologique, ont prouvé que les écoles ayant un taux de pauvreté élevé ont moins d’accès aux ordinateurs et à l’Internet, moins d’usage technologique par les élèves et enseignants/personnel (de manière générale et pour des taches spécifiques), et les enseignants sont moins qualifiés (incompétents) dans l’utilisation des ordinateurs, de l’Internet, et de la technologie dans l’enseignement.   


Copyright 2002 Communication Institute for Online Scholarship, Inc.