Communication Institute for Online Scholarship
Communication Institute for Online
Scholarship Continous online service and innovation
since 1986
Site index
 
ComAbstracts Visual Communication Concept Explorer Tables of Contents Electronic Journal of Communication ComVista

Electronic Journal of Communication Untitled Document
EJC logo
The Electronic Journal of Communication / La Revue Electronique de Communication

Volume 12 Numbers 3 & 4, 2002


LIBERATION IN CYBERSPACE…OR COMPUTER-MEDIATED COLONIZATION?

---

LIBERATION EN CYBERSPACE OU COLONISATION ASSISTEE PAR ORDINATEUR?

Editor/Editeur:

Fay Sudweeks
Murdoch University


Charles Ess
Drury University
 

Introduction/Introduction

 

Charles Ess
Drury University

Fay Sudweeks
Murdoch University

 

Liberation in Cyberspace … or Computer-mediated Colonization?/ Liberation en Cyberspace… Ou Colonisation Assistee par ordinateur ?  
 

Charles Ess
Drury University

Fay Sudweeks
Murdoch University

How Cultural Differences Affect the Use of Information and Communication Technology in Dutch-American Mergers /Comment les Différences Culturelles Affectent l'Usage de l'Information et de la Communication Technologique dans les Fusions Hollandaises et Américaines

Frits D. J. Grotenhuis
KPMG, Amsterdam

Intrinsic and Imposed Motivations to Join the Global Technoculture: Broadening the conceptual discourse on accessibility/Les motivations intrinsèques et imposées pour faire partie de la techno culture mondiale: Elargissement du discours conceptuel sur l’accessibilité.


Dineh Moghdam Davis

University of Hawaii at Manoa

Internet: Clusters of Attractiveness/ Internet: Poles d’attraction

Alexander E. Voiskounsky
Moscow Lomonosov State University

 

The Internet: Producing or Transforming Culture and Gender?/ L’Internet est-il en voix de Générer ou de transformer la culture ou le genre?

Nai Li and Gill Kirkup
The Open University

Nerdy No More: A case study of early Wired (1993-96)/ Une étude des précurseurs de l’Internet   (1993-96)

Ann Willis
Edith Cowan University, Australia

Cyberpower: The Culture and Politics of Cyberspace/ Cyberpower Culture et  politique du Cyberspace

Tim Jordan
Open University

Transformations in the Mediation of Publicness: Communicative Interaction in the Network Society/Les Transformations dans la Médiation du Publique: l'Interaction Communicative dans la Société de Réseau

David Holmes
University of New South Wales

The Kindernetz: Electronic Communication and the Paradox of Individuality/ The Kindernetz: Communication Electronique et Paradoxe de l'Individualité

Hans-Georg Möller
Bonn University

----------------------
EJC/REC Staff:

Managing Editor:
Teresa Harrison
Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute

French Editor:
Lucien Gerber
Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute

Editorial Assistant:
Victoria Moore
Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute


ELECTRONIC JOURNAL OF COMMUNICATION
LA REVUE ELECTRONIQUE DE COMMUNICATION


Volume 12 Numbers 3 & 4, 2002


Editor's Introduction

The papers collected here are drawn largely from presentations originally made at CATaC'00 - the second biennial conference on Cultural Attitudes towards Technology and Communication, co-chaired by Fay Sudweeks and Charles Ess, and held in Perth, Australia,13-16 July 2000. CATaC'00 continued the work of CATaC'98, held in the Science Museum, London - the first conference, to our knowledge, that sought to approach the complex intersections of culture, technology, and communication through a range of interdisciplinary and international perspectives. These perspectives contrast with the dominance of North American perspectives and values that had shaped both the Internet culture of the 1990s and much of the early theoretical considerations and empirical research on the Internet, the Web, and CMC more generally.

The papers collected here were chosen in part because of the multiple ways they address central CATaC themes, and in part because they further illuminate larger topics of current discussion in the literatures of computer-mediated communication (CMC). It is arguable that, in fact, we are in the midst of a sea-change regarding CMC technologies and their utopian promise. At least with regard to more recent theoretical discussion and empirical research, there is a clear move from the more or less unbridled 1980s and 1990s postmodern enthusiasm for these technologies as catalyzing nothing less than individual, cultural, social, political, and economic shifts as revolutionary as the invention of the printing press (if not the invention of fire) - to a more balanced view that emphasizes a more realistic appreciation (realistic because supported by more recent research) of the ways in which CMC technologies entail both distinctively new possibilities and ways of sustaining and enhancing more traditional practices and beliefs. This turn can be seen in a number of ways of which two are especially significant here. To begin with, there is an extensive shift in the pertinent literatures from the hopes of the 1980s and 1990s for a "liberation in cyberspace" accomplished through escape from the body into a disembodied existence that would thus be ostensibly gender-blind in particular and radically egalitarian in general. By contrast, more contemporary views emphasize the role of embodiment at all levels - beginning with how we know the world (epistemology, ontology) and thus how we know to interact with the world and one another as embodied human beings. Similarly, the enthusiasm in the 1990s for virtual communities - spawned in part by cyberpunk fiction such as Neuromancer (1986), popularized by Harold Rheingold's influential volume (1993), and articulated in political terms in John Perry Barlow's famous "A Declaration of the Independence of Cyberspace" (1996) - has given way to a more measured appreciation of the strengths and limits of virtual communities (Baym 1995; Baym forthcoming).

The papers collected here are consistent with these shifts. Indeed, as we are about to see, they help illuminate the multiple issues at work in these shifts. First of all, they bring to the foreground the notion of culture as entailing precisely our most basic views and beliefs regarding who we are as human beings (including the role of embodiment and gender), how we know and what kinds of knowledge are most significant, and the nature of our relationships - including our political relationships - with others in the human community and the larger world. Hence our first section here takes up culture in multiple senses as a primary framework for analysis. Two papers bring to the foreground how cultural beliefs and patterns are beyond the capacity of CMC technologies to mediate. These cultural differences issue in serious misunderstandings in e-mail exchanges, etc. (Grotenhuis) and the technologies themselves embed individual and cultural preferences that favor some and exclude others (Davis). A third paper shows, by contrast, that CMC technologies can sustain and foster cultural engagements at a distance (Voiskounsky). Taken together, these papers suggest that CMC technologies can be used in ways that can preserve and enhance specific cultural values and preferences - especially if we take into account both the cultural values and preferences CMC technologies may embed and the role of cultural values and preferences above and beyond those embedded in the technologies in successful communication. Our second section then focuses specifically on gender - as gender differences work in CMC environments to the disadvantage of women, both cross-culturally (Li and Kirkup) and most centrally in Wired, the defining voice of the 1990s digital revolution (Willis). Finally, we turn to concerns of power - specifically, the claims made as part of the enthusiasm of the 1980s and 1990s, that CMC technologies will inevitably democratize users, organizations, and countries. Jordan provides an analysis of especially the then-prevailing libertarian view - a view that may, however, be "culture-bound" to some degree, i.e., as a predominantly North American conception of democracy, one that is challenged in important ways by a Habermasian view more commonly found in Europe and Australia. The latter is represented here in Holmes' discussion of how far CMC technologies might realize a Habermasian public sphere as a requirement of democracy. Finally, the systems philosophy of Niklas Luhmann provides a critique of both libertarian and Habermasian conceptions of democracy in cyberspace (Moeller). 


Les collisions culturelles au sein de la communication globale

 

Préface et Editorial. Irréductibles frontières culturelles et politiques, elles peuvent aussi contribuer à une meilleure compréhension et démocratisation globale. Mais les attitudes culturelles diverses envers la technologie et la communication viennent aussi des différences culturelles de mise en place et d'usage des technologies de CMC. Ces différences culturelles profondes dans la mise en place et l'usage déçoivent, en grande part, plus qu'elles ne comblent les espoirs d'une plus grande communication globale.

 

Nous questionnons de façon critique les hypothèses sur lesquelles sont basées les vues utopiques et contre-utopiques concernant la connexion globale. Le moyen choisi pour explorer ces questions est un cycle de conférences biennales sur le thème : Attitudes Culturelles envers la Technologie et la Communication (CATaC).  Ces cycles ont pour but de recueillir réflexions théoriques et rapports de recherche des universitaires et des chercheurs travaillant en interdisciplinarité.  Théorie et praxis associés nous éclairent infiniment mieux sur la manière dont la culture façonne notre appropriation et notre utilisation des nouvelles technologies de communication.

 

Les articles réunis ici sont tirés principalement des présentations faites à la deuxième conférence du cycle CATaC'00, co-présidé par Fay Sudweeks et Charles Ess, et tenu à Perth en Australie, le 13-16 juillet 2000. La première conférence de CATaC a été tenue en 1998 dans le Musée de la Science à Londres - le premier dans les cycles de conférences biennales, le premier, à notre connaissance, à avoir tenté une approche des croisements complexes de la culture, la technologie, et la communication à travers un éventail de perspectives interdisciplinaires et internationales.  Les présentateurs et les participants à la conférence ont représenté 11 pays. Les réflexions introduites dans ce numéro spécial aident à notre compréhension de la - quelquefois violente mais souvent fructueuse - collision entre les nouvelles technologies et les diverses cultures.

 

Trois autres articles de la conférence, portant sur les conflits culturels entre les technologies de CMC de l'Ouest et les peuples divers (y compris les cultures indigènes) dans les pays en voie de développement, ont été rassemblés dans un numéro spécial de New Media and Society (Ess et Sudweeks, 2001). Quatre articles supplémentaires de CATaC'00, concernant les conclusions relatives aux transformations culturelles de communication et de connaissance dans la région Asie Pacifique, sont regroupés dans un numéro spécial du Journal of Computer Mediated Communication (Zhu, Sudweeks et Ess, 2002). Des publications postérieures à la première conférence (CATaC'98) ont inclus un numéro spécial de EJC/REC (Sudweeks et Ess, 1998), Al and Society (Ess et Sudweeks, 1999), Javnost-the Public (Sudweeks et Ess, 1999), et l'ouvrage récent de Culture, Technology, Communication: Towards an Intercultural Global Village (Ess, 2001). Pour finir, les marches à suivre pour participer aux conférences de CATaC sont disponibles à http://www.it.murdoch.edu.au/catac/.

 

Nous aimerions exprimer notre grande reconnaissance à Teresa Harrison, dont l'encouragement initial nous a amenés à entreprendre la tâche intimidante d'organiser la première conférence de CATaC, et dont les suggestions en grand nombre et les idées judicieuses non seulement ont abouti mais continuent à donner des résultats - comme cette deuxième collection d'essais de CATaC'00 atteste. Nous adressons également nos remerciements, pour le succès de CATaC'00, à Andrew Turk et à Mark Gibson (tous les deux de l'Université de Murdoch) qui ont occupé la fonction de Vice-Présidents

 

Nos remerciements vont aussi à Moira Dawe (l'Université de Murdoch), le Directeur de conférence, les membres du Comité Organisant Local (Matthew Allen, Steve Benson, John Gammack, Fiona MacMillan, Richard Thomas, et Kathryn Trees) qui ont pris en charge de nombreux détails avec habileté et grâce, ainsi que le Comité de Programme des 16 membres qui ont assuré un haut niveau d'érudition dans leur révision d'articles soumis. La conférence a apprécié le sponsorat généreux de Al & Society (Springer Verlag), le American Bible Society's Research Center for Scripture and Media, la Association of Internet Researchers (http://www.aoir.org), l'Université de Drury, la Korea Society, McGraw-Hill d'Australie, et, à l'Université de Murdoch, la Division d'Affaires, la Technologie d'Information et le Droit, et le Centre pour la Recherche Culturelle et la Communication. Nous invitons les lecteurs à nous soumettre leurs commentaires et leurs suggestions et à joindre notre groupe de discussion consacré aux questions en relation avec CATaC (http://philo.at/mailman/listinfo/catac) et à participer aux futures conférences de CATaC.

 



Liberation in cyberspace…or computer-mediated Colonization?


Charles Ess

Drury University

Fay Sudweeks
Murdoch University

 

Abstract. At the second biennial conference on Cultural Attitudes towards Technology and Communication papers were presented on the strengths and limits of CMC technologies. The first two papers bring to the foreground how cultural beliefs and patterns are beyond the capacity of CMC technologies to mediate. The second section focuses on how gender differences work in CMC environments to the disadvantage of women. Finally issues of power are dealt with, specifically that CMC technologies will inevitably democratize users, organizations and countries.

 

Liberation en Cyberspace… Ou Colonisation Assistee par ordinateur ? Au cours du second congrès biennal sur les attitudes culturelles à l’égard des technologies et communication, des conférences ont été prononcées sur les forces et les limites des technologies de la communication assistée par ordinateur (CMC en anglais.) Les deux premières conférences montrent comment les différences culturelles dépassent les capacités des technologies de la communication assistée par ordinateur de jouer pleinement son rôle. La seconde partie du congrès met en relief comment les différences au niveau du genre, fonctionnent dans un milieu CMC au détriment des femmes. En dernier lieu, des sujets ayant trait au pouvoir sont débattus, espérant que les technologies de la communication assistée par ordinateur vont inévitablement démocratiser les utilisateurs, organisations et les pays.


How Cultural Differences Affect the Use of Information and Communication Technology in Dutch-American Mergers


Frits D. J. Grotenhuis
KPMG, Amsterdam

Abstract. This paper discusses how cultural differences affect the use of information and communication technology in Dutch-American mergers. The preliminary findings of two case studies are used to illustrate: (i) how culture shapes communication attitudes; (ii) the problems encountered with the use of computer-mediated communication in such merger processes; and (iii) problems with the integration of different information technology systems. Theoretically it was expected that culture would have a profound effect on the use of information and communication technologies, such as computer-mediated communication. First results, indeed, indicate that miscommunication via e-mail is due to cultural differences, although the impact of culture depends on the degree of integration between the merging companies. Moreover, language and also the contextual differences of the information exchanged play a role. Furthermore, the Internet and videoconferencing were more and more frequently used in the studied cases. Regarding videoconferencing, distance and time differences played a major role, as did cultural differences. In both mergers studied, the adaptation and integration of IT systems was heavily underestimated and more complicated because of cultural differences. The first results indicate that, despite all advantages of computer-mediated communication, face-to-face meetings remain necessary to prevent (culture) clashes in the long run.

Comment les Différences Culturelles Affectent l'Usage de l'Information et de la Communication Technologique dans les Fusions Hollandaises et Américaines. Cet article analyse  les différences culturelles affectant  l’utilisation  des technologies de l’information  et de communication dans les fusions des compagnies (sociétés) hollando-américaines. Les  résultats préliminaires de deux recherches sont utilisés  pour montrer (i) comment la culture  affecte les attitudes  dans les  communications ; (ii)  les difficultés  rencontrées dans l’utilisation  de la  communication  assistée par ordinateur dans ce genre de fusions en cours. ; (iii) et les obstacles dans l’intégration de différents systèmes des technologies de l’information. Théoriquement,  on s’attendait (pensait)  à ce que la culture ait un énorme impact sur l’utilisation  des technologies de l’information et de communication. Les résultats préliminaires, montrent (indiquent)  en effet que les miscommunications par email  sont dues à des différences culturelles, bien que l’impact de la culture dépende du niveau d’intégration des compagnies en fusion.  D’ailleurs la langue ainsi que les différences contextuelles des renseignements échangés jouent un rôle primordial.  Par ailleurs, l’Internet et la vidéoconférence ont été plus fréquemment analysés dans les cas étudiés. Quant à ce qui concerne la vidéoconférence,  la distance et les décalages horaires ont joué un rôle primordial comme dans le cas des différences culturelles. Dans les deux cas de fusion étudiés,  l’adaptation et l’intégration des  systèmes  IT ont été largement sous estimés et plus compliqués à cause des différences culturelles. Les résultats préliminaires montrent que, malgré tous les avantages  des communications assistées par ordinateur,  les rencontres  (réunions) en personne restent  encore nécessaires pour éviter les malentendus (culturels) à la longue.


Intrinsic and Imposed Motivations to Join the Global Technoculture:
Broadening the conceptual discourse on accessibility

Dineh Moghdam Davis
University of Hawaii at Manoa

Abstract. Regardless of their local culture or personal value system, many individuals will be facing the realities of joining a global workforce with its emphasis on technological complexity and a shift from physical to mental labor. This paper will examine certain reactions to new Information and Communication Technologies (ICTs) based on the diversity of human affinities and values for contributing to their social environment. Heuristic information will point to manifestations of such values within cultures, and their embeddedness (or lack thereof) in the technocultural space. Some concerns include the universal human desire for happiness, control, and choice as well as their predispositions toward natural and physical interactivity, non-mediated interpersonal relationships, rejection of compartmentalization and dualistic thinking, and a preference for flow and peak experiences in a more tangible three-dimensional environment.

Les motivations intrinsèques et imposées pour faire partie de la techno culture mondiale: Elargissement du discours conceptuel sur l’accessibilité. Sans sesoucier de leur culture locale ou de leur propre morale, beaucoup d’individus vont être confrontés à la dure réalité de se joindre à une main-d’œuvre globale (qui s’appuie sur) caractérisée par ses complexités technologiques et  par le  passage du travail manuel ( physique) au travail  intellectuel. Cet article va analyser certaines réactions des nouvelles technologies de l’information et des communications (Les Tics en français ICTs) basées sur la diversité des affinités et valeurs humaines pour contribuer à leur environnement social. Des renseignements heuristiques vont indiquer  l’existence de ce genre de valeur au sein des cultures et de l’intégration (ou absence ) dans l’espace techno culturel.  Certaines préoccupations  se situent  au niveau du désir universel  humain pour le bonheur, le contrôle, et l’option ainsi que sa prédisposition à l’égard de l’interactivité naturelle et physique, des relations interpersonnelles sans intermediaries.


Internet: Clusters of Attractiveness

Alexander E. Voiskounsky
Moscow Lomonosov State University


Abstract. The world-wide Internet is becoming multiethnic and multilingual. The recently formed Russian Internet culture (the Russian segment of the world-wide Internet culture) is analyzed. This segment - though not too impressive in amount and diversity - is called a cluster of attractiveness, since it attracts visitors (subscribers, content providers, surfers, etc.) from outside Russia. The motivations for being attracted to the Russian segment of the Internet are described. 

Internet: Poles d’attraction.  L’Internet est en  train de devenir  multiethnique  et  plurilingue (polyglotte.) La nouvelle mise sur pied de la version russe de l’Internet  est analysée.  Cette version  russe de l’Internet bien que n’étant pas très impressionnante en quantité et  en diversité-  est appelée  une étoile brillante, parce qu’elle attire des  visiteurs   ( des techniciens,  des surfer  etc.)  de l’étranger. Les raisons du succès de la version russe de l’Internet sont évoquées.

The Internet: Producing or Transforming Culture and Gender?

Nai Li and Gill Kirkup
The Open University

Abstract. This paper explores gender differences between the Internet use of British and Chinese students. It reports on a questionnaire survey carried out on male and female undergraduate students aged between 18 and 23 in four universities in China and in Britain. The results showed some significant geographical and gender differences, but no significant difference in attitude toward the Internet between the two cultures.

L’Internet est-il en voix de Générer ou de transformer la culture ou le genre? Cet article explore les différences des attitudes du genre dans l’utilisation de l’Internet chez des étudiants anglais et chinois. L’article donne le résultat d’un sondage de garçons et filles d’étudiants sous gradués dans la tranche d’âge de 18 à 23 ans de quatre universités en Grande Bretagne et en Chine. Les résultats montrent qu’il existe des différences fondamentales du point de vue géographique et au niveau du genre, mais pas de différence fondamentale d’attitude à l’égard de l’Internet entre les deux cultures.


Nerdy No More:
A case study of early Wired (1993-96)

Ann Willis
Edith Cowan University, Australia

Abstract. This paper uses the early issues of Wired as a vehicle for interrogating notions of the techno-lifestyle anticipated as a result of the corporatisation of the Internet. It implies a cultural collision between society as we knew it, and the techno-lifestyle anticipated by the Wired visionaries. This cultural collision occurs at the nexus of: cyberdemocracy and restricted cyber-access; social hierarchies of race and gender; and participation as consumption reinforced through the Wired text.

Une étude des précurseurs de l’Internet   (1993-96). Cet article est basé sur les premiers  problèmes  de l’Internet  comme médium  pour mettre en question des notions de techno- culture,  dues à la corporatisation de l’Internet. Cela  sous-entend  une collision  culturelle entre la société telle qu’on la connue, et la techno-culture,  prévue par les savants de l’Internet. Cette collision culturelle se manifeste comme une  cyberdémocratie par rapport à ceux qui n’ont pas accès à l’Internet ;  entre race et genre.


Nerdy No More:
The Culture and Politics of Cyberspace

Tim Jordan
Open University

Abstract. An overall understanding of the Internet and cyberspace from an integrated sociological, cultural, political, and economic perspective would be a key resource for understanding and developing virtual life. This paper proposes such an understanding by defining the nature of power in cyberspace. Cyberpower has three intertwined levels, each of which is permeated by a different type of power. First, when cyberspace is understood as the playground of the individual, then cyberpower appears as possessions individuals can use. Here can be found the obvious and typical forms of cyberpolitics such as privacy, encryption, censorship, and so on. Second, when cyberspace is understood as a social place, a place where communities exist, then cyberpower appears as a technopower in which greater freedom of action is offered to those who can control forms of cyberspatial and Internet technology. The three linked figures of Kevin Mitnick, Bill Gates, and Linus Torvalds exemplify this form of cyberpower because they are all, in different ways, "powerful" because of their ability to manipulate virtual technologies. The conclusion of this form of cyberpower is that what appears from the individuals' perspective to be an empowering medium is, from the social perspective, dominated by a technologically empowered elite. Third, when the Internet and cyberspace are understood as being a society or even a digital nation, then cyberpower appears as an imagination through which individuals recognize in each other a common commitment to virtual life. This imagination is structured by opposed obsessions with the heaven that cyberspace may bring, with immortal, godlike life on silicon as its ultimate goal, and the hell cyberspace may bring, with the total, minute surveillance of all lives made possible by cyberspace. These three forms of cyberpower are closely interrelated because the imagination is the medium in which cyberpower of the individual and of society exist and because these two powers feed each other through individuals' demands for better tools which leads to greater elaborations of technology and so feeds the power of a technopower elite. The final conclusion from this analysis is that cyberspace and the Internet are riven by a sociological, cultural, economic, and political battle between the individual and a technopower elite.

Cyberpower Culture et  politique du Cyberspace.  Une compréhension   globale  de l’Internet  et du cyberspace d’un point de vue sociologique, culturel, politique et économique serait une source clé pour la compréhension  et le développement de la vie virtuelle. Cet article propose une telle compréhension en définissant  la nature du pouvoir en cyberspace.  Il y a trois types de cyberpower, chacun est composé d’un différent type de pouvoir. Premièrement, lorsque  cyberspace est considéré comme le lieu de recréation de l’individu, en ce moment  cyberpower  apparaît comme une propriété privée dont se  sert  l’individu à des fins personnelles.. Ici, apparaissent les formes évidentes et typiques de cyberpolitics comme les problèmes liés à la vie privée,  à l’encryptage, à la censure,  etc..

Deuxièmement, lorsqu’on entend cyberspace comme un lieu social, un lieu où il existe  interaction entre  communautés, en ce moment cyberpower  apparaît comme un technopower  qui offre  une grande liberté d’action  à ceux  qui peuvent contrôler  certaines formes spatiales du cyber et les technologies de l’Internet. Kevin Mitnick, Bill Gates,  et Linus Torvalds incarnent cette forme de cyberpower, car ils sont tous les trois d’une manière ou d’une autre très  « puissants »  à cause de leur capacité de manipuler les technologies virtuelles. La conclusion de ce type de cyberpower, est que ce qui apparaît du point de vue  individuel comme un médium de pouvoir, est  du point de vue social, dominé par une élite rendue technologiquement puissante. Troisièmement, lorsque l’Internet et  cyberspace sont aperçus comme  une société ou même comme une nation numérique, en ce moment, cyberpower apparaît comme une illusion  à travers  laquelle les gens  s’identifient pour s’engager  à la vie virtuelle. Cette illusion  est structurée par des obsessions en contradiction avec  une vie éternelle de paradis que  cyberspace  pourrait donner d’une part, et une vie d’enfer  d’autre part. Ces trois formes de cyberpower sont étroitement  reliées  (en corrélation) entre elles parce que l’illusion  (le rêve) est le médium à travers lequel  le cyberpower de l’individu et de la société existent et parce que ces deux pouvoirs fonctionnement grâce aux  exigences  des gens  pour de meilleurs outils qui entraînent   d’enormes recherches en  technologie qui donc alimente le pouvoir d’une élite  technopower. La conclusion finale qui découle de  cette analyse est que cyberspace et l’Internet sont dechirés par une guerre sociologique, culturelle, économique, et politique entre l’individu et une technopower élite.

 


Transformations in the Mediation of Publicness:
Communicative Interaction in the Network Society

David Holmes
University of New South Wales

Abstract. Recent debates on the role of computer-mediated communication (CMC) in facilitating a democratisation of the public sphere are criticised for presenting inadequate accounts of the public sphere that is being transformed. Like broadcast communication, computer-mediated communication does not obey national borders. Because of this a number of questions are raised insofar as the traditional conception of the public sphere has invariably corresponded to the nation-state. The difference between embodied and electronic assemblies, between an homogenous public sphere and public 'sphericules' is introduced in order to clarify the political and communicative significance of contemporary CMC.

Les Transformations dans la Médiation du Publique: l'Interaction Communicative dans la Société de Réseau. Récents débats sur le rôle de la communication assistée par ordinateur  (CMC en anglais) comme médium de promotion de démocratie,  sont critiqués pour avoir donné un mauvais compte rendu de la situation de la communauté virtuelle qui est en train d’être transformée.  Tout comme la diffusion  des médias, la communication assistée par ordinateur ne se limite  pas à  des frontières nationales. A cause de ceci,  un bon nombre de questions sont posées dans la mesure ou le concept traditionnel de l’espace public a été toujours  l’équivalent du concept de l’état-nation. La différence entre rencontre en personne et  rencontre virtuelle, entre un public homogène et un groupuscule, est mise en relief dans le but de clarifier le sens politique et communicatif de la communication assistée par ordinateur de nos jours.


The Kindernetz:
Electronic Communication and the Paradox of Individuality

Hans-Georg Möller
Bonn University

Abstract. "Children's Net" is an Internet site established by a German semi-state-owned and non-commercial broadcasting company for the use by children. This paper discusses the six "Children's Net Rules" that children must agree to, to be allowed to enter the "city-hall". Their website equates learning to communicate with learning to behave politically and this approach is contrasted with the Habermasian approach to individuality and communication with the systemic thought of Niklas Luhmann.

The Kindernetz: Communication Electronique et Paradoxe de l'Individualité.  Children’s Net” est un site Internet crée par une organisation semi-gouvernementale allemande dont le but est non lucratif pour l’usage exclusif des enfants. Cet article stipule les six règles d’or de “ Children’s Net que les enfants doivent respecter, pour pouvoir avoir la permission d’entrer à la “mairie.” Le but de leur site web est d’apprendre à communiquer en même temps qu’ils reçoivent une éducation politique, approche qui contraste à celle de Haber qui met l’accent sur l’individualité et la communication avec la philosophie systémique de Niklas Luhmann.


Copyright 2002 Communication Institute for Online Scholarship, Inc.

This file may not be publicly distributed or reproduced without written permission of the Communication Institute for Online Scholarship, P.O. Box 57, Rotterdam Jct., NY 12150 USA (phone: 518-887-2443).