Communication Institute for Online Scholarship
Communication Institute for Online
Scholarship Continous online service and innovation
since 1986
Site index
 
ComAbstracts Visual Communication Concept Explorer Tables of Contents Electronic Journal of Communication ComVista

The Power Of The Audience: Interculturality, Interactivity and Trust in Internet Communication: Research Design and Empirical Results

EJC logo
The Electronic Journal of Communication / La Revue Electronique de Communication

Volume 15 Numbers 1 & 2, 2005

 
COMMUNICATION, CULTURE AND PRAXIS

COMMUNICATION, CULTURE ET PRAXIS

 

Editors/Editeurs:

 

Fay Sudweeks

Murdoch University, Australia

 

Charles Ess

Drury University, USA

 

Editorial Preface/ Préface Editoriale

 

Fay Sudweeks

Murdoch University, Australia

 

Charles Ess

Drury University, USA

The power of  the audience: Interculturality, interactivity and trust in internet communication: Research design and empirical results/La puissance du public L’interculturalité, l’interactivité et la foi dans la communication Internet 

Hans-Juergen Bucher

University of Trier

Effects of cultural differences on e-mail communication in multicultural environments/Les effets des différences culturelles dans les communications courriels dans des environnements multiculturels

Hasan Cakir
Barbara A. Bichelmeyer
Indiana University
, USA

Kursat Cagiltay
Middle East Technical University
, Turkey

 

Cultural viability of global English in creating universal meaning in technologically mediated communicationLa viabilite culturelle de l’anglais en tant que langue Global a cree un sens universel dans la communication technologique intermediaire 

Dineh M. Davis

University of Hawaii at Manoa

Cultural perceptions of face negotiation in online learning environments/Les perceptions culturelles dans les négociations personnelles parmi les milieux d'apprentissage en ligne

Charlotte N. Gunawardena

Sharon L. Walsh

Ethel M. Gregory

M. Yvonne Lake

Leslie E. Reddinger

The University of New Mexico

 

Gender differences in the perception and use of e-mail in two South African organizations/Les différences de gendres dans la perception et dans l'utilisation du courriel pour deux organisations en Afrique du Sud

 

Jean-Paul W. G. D. Van Belle

Adrie Stander

University of Cape Town

 

A qualitative analysis of online group process in two cultural contexts/Une analyse qualitative du processus de groupe en ligne dans deux contextes culturels. 

Penne L. Wilson, Ana C. Nolla, Charlotte N. Gunawardena

University of New Mexico

 

Jose R. López-Islas, Noemi Ramírez-Angel, Rosa M. Megchun-Alpírez

Universidad Virtual del Tec De Monterrey

Monterrey, Mexico


Communication, Culture and Praxis

Editorial Preface

The papers collected in this special issue on Communication, Culture and Praxis are drawn largely from presentations made at the International Conference on Cultural Attitudes towards Technology and Communication (CATaC’02), co-chaired by Charles Ess and Fay Sudweeks. The conference, held in Montréal , Canada , 12-15 July 2002, was the third international conference in the CATaC biennial series. This conference series aims to provide an international forum for the presentation and discussion of both theory and praxis on how diverse cultural attitudes shape our appropriation and use of information and communication technologies. Presenters and participants attending the CATaC’02 represented 20 countries.

The theme of the conference was The Net(s) of Power: Language, Culture and Technology. The powers of the Nets can be construed in many ways - political, economic, and social. Power can also be construed in terms of Foucault's “positive power” and Bourdieu's notion of “cultural capital” - decentered forms of power that encourage “voluntary” submission, such as English as a lingua franca on the Net. Similarly, Hofstede’s category of “power distance” points to the role of status in encouraging technology diffusion, as low-status persons seek to emulate high-status persons. Through these diverse forms of power, the language(s) and media of the Net may reshape the cultural assumptions of its globally-distributed users - thus raising the dangers of “computer-mediated colonization” (“Disneyfication” - a la Cees Hamelink).

The notion of power in relation to communication, culture and praxis is explored by Hans-Jürgen Bucher as he takes the unusual stance of looking at the Internet from the perspective of its audience. He argues that the power of the Net can be understood by studying the processes of interactivity and trust between communicator and audience. He demonstrates that during times of crises, such as the Kosovo war and September 11, Internet traffic increases drastically. This is supported in the more recent example of Hurricane Katrina in southern United States, where web sites with news and weather updates of the devastation experienced three-digit growth (Nielsen, 2005).

Power is also invested in the recipient of email communication. Power is reflected in the ways in which email communicators adjust their language style, email length, and the use of emotions and emoticons to the intended audience. The second paper in this issue (Hasan Cakir, Barbara Bichelmeyer and Kursat Cagiltay) shows that the interplay of communicator and recipient is influenced by both the intended recipient and cultural values and assumptions. However, while culture does contribute to differences in email communication, the effect is not as salient as in face-to-face environments. The study described by Cakir et al. uses a conceptual framework that is informed by cultural theorists such as Geertz, Hofstede and Hall. Cakir et al. found there is a tendency for certain cultural groups to communicate in a particular way (e.g. consistent with Hofstede’s power distance dimension) but that communicators are able to adapt readily to the context and requirements of any specific communication event.

In contrast to the first two papers, the third paper in this issue highlights the superficiality of much of the low-to-no-context communication on the Net. Dineh Davis points out that this superficiality is directly related to differences in the cultural value systems of senders. She illustrates her argument with reference to case studies of a variety of value systems, such as the concepts of love, courtesy and trust, which directly affect the “appropriate absorption of the message by its intended audience”. She refers to Net-based conversations as Sensen – sender-sender dyads – which are typically superficial in nature. Sensen describes eloquently (and concisely!) the reactive rather than interactive (Rafaeli & Sudweeks, 1998) communication on the Net.

Extending the research arena further, the fourth paper in this issue (Lani Gunawardena, Sharon Walsh, Ethel Gregory, Yvonne Lake and Leslie Reddinger) explores communication praxis in the online learning environment. Like Cakir et al., Gunawardena et al. draw on the cultural dimensions of Hofstede and Hall (power distance, individualism/collectivism and high/low context) to investigate cultural differences in negotiating “face” in online communication. Unlike Caker et al., though, Gunawardena et al. found the frameworks inadequate to explain systematic cultural differences. In face, regardless of cultural background, individuals work hard to project a positive and knowledgeable presence to both peers and instructors. It may be that, in Foucaultian terms, CMC technologies engender positive power in individuals that transcends cultural power.

And it may also be that CMC technologies impact on gender perceptions of communication. In the fifth paper in this issue, Jean-Paul van Belle and Adrie Stander surveyed two groups of users to determine factors that influence email acceptance and use. Like Gunawardena et al., van Belle and Stander found similarities in perceptions of social presence in terms of gender and age. However, there is a trend towards communication technologies empowering young women, at least in South Africa .

Hofstede’s dimensions also provided part of the cultural framework for the sixth paper in this issue (Penne Wilson, Ana Nolla, Lani Gunawardena, Jose López-Islas, Noemi Ramírez-Angel and Rosa Megchun-Alpirez). In this paper, the authors explore factors that empower a group when working together. In addition to those factors identified by Hofstede, other cultural commonalities such as language and time frame also feature significantly.

As the reader will discover, some authors in this issue have found Hofstede’s and Hall’s frameworks fruitful for analyzing cultural dimensions of online communication research. These frameworks and alternative cultural frameworks are explored more fully in our forthcoming special issue of the Journal of Computer Mediated Communication (Vol. 11, No. 1: October, 2005 - http://jcmc.indiana.edu).

We would like to express our appreciation once again to Teri Harrison, whose original encouragement led us to launch the CATaC series of conferences. We also wish to thank our fellow organizers for the success of CATaC'02 – in particular, the Local Chair, Lorna Heaton, and the 32-member Program Committee who ensured a high standard of scholarship in their review of submitted papers. We invite readers to participate in our next CATaC conference in Tartu , Estonia in 2006 and in future CATaC conferences (see www.catacconference.org for further information).


Communication, Culture et Praxis

Préface Editoriale

Les articles rassemblés pour cette publication spéciale de Communication, Culture et Praxis sont largement pris des présentations faites à la Conférence Internationale des Attitudes Culturelles envers la Technologie et la Communication (CATaC 2002) présidé par Charles Ess et Fay Sudweeks.  La conférence, ayant eu lieu du 12 au 15 juillet 2002 à Montréal au Canada, était la troisième conférence internationale dans la série biennale du CATaC.  Cette série de conférence a pour but d’offrir un forum international pour la présentation et la discussion de la théorie ainsi que de la praxis dans la façon dont les attitudes culturelles diverses forment nos appropriations et nos utilisations des informations et des communications technologiques.  20 pays étaient représentés par des présentateurs ainsi que par les participants ayant assisté au CATaC 2002.  

Le thème de la conférence était la Puissance de Internet : le langage, la culture, et la technologie.  La puissance de Internet peut être interprété de façons politique, économique, et sociale.  La puissance peut être aussi interprété dans les termes de la « puissance positive » de Foucault ainsi que dans la notion du « capital culturel » de Bourdieu qui sont des formes de puissance non centré encouragent la soumission « volontaire » tel que l’anglais en tant que langue véhiculaire sur Internet.  De la même façon, la catégorie de Hofstede sur la « distance du pouvoir » montre que le rôle de la position sociale a encouragé la diffusion technologique où une personne d’un statut peu élevé cherche à émulé quelqu’un d’un statut élevé.  A travers ces formes de puissance différentes, la langue et les médias de Internet peuvent refaçonner les hypothèses culturelles de ses utilisateurs universelle et, de ce faisant, accroître les dangers de la « colonisation à travers l’ordinateur ».  (La Dysneyfication à la Cees Hamelink)

La notion du pouvoir en relation avec la communication, la culture, et la praxis est exploré par Hans-Jürgen Bucher qui examine Internet à travers la perspective de l’audience.  Il argumente que la puissance de Internet peut être comprise en étudiant les processus d’interactivités et de confiance entre les communicateurs et l’audience.  Il démontre que pendant les périodes de crises tel que la guerre au Kosovo ou les évènements du 11 septembre, le trafic Internet s’accroît dramatiquement.  Cette étude est renforcée par l’exemple plus récent de l’ouragan de Katrina dans le Sud des Etats-Unis où les sites web mettant à jour les nouvelles et les conditions météorologiques de la dévastation ont connu une croissance triple (Nielsen, 2005). 

Le pouvoir est aussi investi dans ceux qui reçoivent des communications électroniques.  Le pouvoir est reflété dans les façons dans lesquelles les communicateurs de courriels  ajustent leur style de langage, la longueur de leurs courriels, et l’utilisation des émotions et des émoticons pour l’audience visée.  Le second article dans cette publication (Hasan Cakir, Barbara Bichelmeyer et Kursat Cagiltay) montre que l’interaction de communicateur et de destinataire est influencée de par qui est le receveur de cette communication ainsi que par les valeurs culturelles et autres suppositions.  Cependant, bien que la culture contribue à des différences de communication électronique, l’effet n’est pas aussi proéminent que dans les environnements du face à face.  L’étude décrite par Cakir et autres utilise une structure conceptuelle qui est informé par des théoriciens culturels tels que Geertz, Hofstede et Hall.  Cakir et autres ont trouvé qu’il y a une tendance pour certains groupes culturels à communiquer de façon particulière (en accord avec la dimension de puissance de Hofstede), mais les communicateurs sont capable de s’adapter facilement au contexte et aux besoins des évènements de communication spécifiques.

En contraste avec les deux premières études, la troisième étude démontre la superficialité de beaucoup de communications n’ayant aucun contexte sur Internet.  Dineh Davis nous montre que cette superficialité est en relation direct avec les différences de valeurs culturelles des expéditeurs de systèmes.  Elle illustre sa discussion avec des références de cas d’études de systèmes de valeurs variés, tel que les concepts de l’amour, de la courtoisie et de la confiance qui concerne directement « l’absorption appropriée du message par son audience désiré ».  Dineh Davis fait référence aux conversations basées sur Internet qui sont typiquement superficielles par nature.  Dineh Davis décrit avec éloquence et de façon concise le réactif plutôt que l’interactif (Rafaeli et Sudweeks, 1998) des communications sur Internet.   

Poussant le domaine de la recherche plus loin, la quatrième étude dans cette publication (Lani Gunawardena, Sharon Walsh, Ethel Gregory, Yvonne Lake et Leslie Reddinger) explore la praxis de communication dans un environnement d’apprentissage en ligne.  Comme Cakir et autres, Gunawardena et autres tirent sur les dimensions culturelles de Hofstede et Hall (le pouvoir de la distance, l’individualisme et le collectivisme, et le contexte du haut et du bas) pour enquêter sur les différences culturelles des négociations de face dans la communication en ligne.  Au contraire de Caker et autres, Gunawardena et autres ont trouvé les structures inadaptées pour expliquer les différences culturelles systématiques.  Quelque soit le milieu culturel, les individus travaillent dur afin de projeter une présence positive et instruite sur ses pairs ainsi que sur ses professeurs.  Il est possible que, dans les termes de Foucault, les technologies CMC engendrent une puissance positive des individus qui dépassent la puissance culturelle. 

Il est aussi possible que les technologies CMC aient un impact sur la perception des genres de communication.  Dans la cinquième étude, Jean-Paul van Belle et Adrie Stander étudient deux groupes d’utilisateurs afin de déterminer les facteurs qui influencent l’acceptation et l’utilisation des courriels.  Comme Gunawardena et autres, van Belle et Stander ont trouvé des ressemblances dans les perceptions de la présence sociale en termes de genre et d’âge.  Toutefois, il existe une tendance vers les communications technologiques rendant les jeunes femmes plus puissantes, du moins en Afrique du Sud. 

Les dimensions de Hofstede ont fourni une partie du cadre pour la sixième étude dans cette publication (Penne Wilson, Ana Nolla, Lani Gunawardena, Jose López-Islas, Noemi Ramírez-Angel et Rosa Megchun-Alpirez). Dans cette étude, les auteurs explorent les éléments qui rendent le groupe plus puissant quand celui-ci est ensemble.  En plus des facteurs identifiés par Hofstede, d’autres aspects culturels commun tels que le langage et les délais sont représentés. 

Tel que le lecteur va découvrir, certains auteurs dans cette publication ont trouvé les structures de Hofstede et de Hall utile pour analyser les dimensions culturelles de la recherche de communication en ligne.  Ces structures ainsi que d’autres structures d’ordres culturelles sont examinées de façon plus approfondi dans notre prochaine édition spéciale du Journal of Computer Mediated Communication (Vol. 11, No.1: Octobre, 2005 – http://jcmc.indiana.edu).

Nous souhaitons exprimer notre gratitude encore une fois à Teri Harrison, dont l’encouragement a abouti à ce que nous lancions la série de conférence de CATaC.  Nous souhaitons aussi remercier les membres organisateurs pour le succès de CATaC 2002 et en particulier, Lorna Heaton ainsi que les 32 membres du comité qui ont garanti un haut standard de critique des articles soumis.  Nous invitons les lecteurs a participé dans notre prochaine conférence CATaC qui aura lieu à Tartu en Estonie en 2006 ainsi qu’aux futures conférences de CATaC (voir www.catacconference.org pour plus d’information).

References

Bourdieu, P. (1986). The forms of capital. Trans. Richard Nice. In J. G. Richardson (Ed.), Handbook of Theory and Research for the Sociology of Education. New York: Greenwood.


Foucault, M. (1980). 'Body/Power' and ‘Truth and Power’. In C. Gordon (Ed.) Michel Foucault: Power/Knowledge, U.K.: Harvester.


Hamelink, C. (2000). The Ethics of Cyberspace. New York: Sage.


Hofstede, G. (1980). Culture's Consequences: International Differences in Work-Related Values. Beverly Hills, CA: Sage.


Neilsen. (2005) http://www.nielsen-netratings.com/pr/pr_050901.pdf.


Rafaeli, S. and Sudweeks, F. (1998). Interactivity on the Nets. In F. Sudweeks, M. McLaughlin and S. Rafaeli, Network and Netplay: Virtual Groups on the Internet (pp. 173-190). Cambridge, MA: MIT Press.


The Power of  the Audience: Interculturality, Interactivity and Trust in Internet Communication: Research Design and Empirical Results

 

Hans-Juergen Bucher

University of Trier

Abstract. The question of the power of the Internet is investigated in this paper from the perspective of the audience. One cannot fully understand Internet communication without taking into account the role of an interactive audience. To clarify the relationship between Internet communication and culture, therefore, this paper proceeds in three steps. First, I argue for a paradigm shift from the power of the communicator to the power of the audience. Second, I characterize Internet communication with respect to three basic concepts: the concepts of interactivity, intercultural communication, and trust. And third, I present a research design and some empirical results on how the power of the audience could be verified.

La puissance du public L’interculturalité, l’interactivité et la foi dans la communication Interne.: La théorie, le plan de recherche et les résultats concrets: La question de l’importance de Internet est enquêtée dans cette étude à travers la perspective du public. Personne ne peut parfaitement comprendre la communication Internet sans prendre en compte le rôle interactif du public. Afin de clarifier le rapport entre la communication Internet et la culture, cette étude procède de trois façons. Premièrement, je discute d’un changement paradigme de la puissance du communicateur à la puissance du public. Deuxièmement, je caractérise la communication Internet avec trois concepts de bases : les concepts de l’interactivité, la communication interculturelle, et la foi. Troisièmement, je présente un dessin de recherche et quelques résultats concrets dans la façon de vérifier la véritable importance du public.


Effects of Cultural Differences on E-Mail Communication in Multicultural Environments

 

Hasan Cakir
Barbara A. Bichelmeyer
Indiana University
, USA

 

Kursat Cagiltay
Middle East Technical University
, Turkey

 

Abstract. The values and assumptions of our culture of origin form our beliefs and behavior and thus we see the world through the lenses of our cultural values, mostly without being consciously aware of those values. Because of the availability of new information and communication technologies, recently people from different cultures have started to communicate and work together through computer networks. This type of multicultural communication is completely new for human beings and issues related to it need to be explored. In this study, the researchers explored the cultural dimensions of e-mail communication in a multi-cultural environment.

 

Les effets des différences culturelles dans les communications courriels dans des environnements multiculturels. Les valeurs et les suppositions de notre culture d’origine forme nos croyances et notre attitude et ainsi, nous voyons le monde à travers nos valeurs culturelles, sans que nous soyons, pour l’essentiel, conscient de ces valeurs. Grâce à la disponibilité de nouvelles informations et de nouvelles communications technologiques, récemment, les gens de cultures différentes ont commencé à communiquer et à travailler ensemble à travers les réseaux d’ordinateurs. Ce genre de communication multiculturelle est complètement nouveau pour les êtres humains et les questions qui en découlent doivent être exploré. Dans cette étude, les chercheurs ont exploré les dimensions culturelles des communications courriels dans un environnement multiculturel.


Cultural Viability of Global English in Creating Universal Meaning in
Technologically Mediated Communication

Dineh M. Davis

University of Hawaii at Manoa

 

Abstract: For the majority of current and future Information and Communication Technologies (ICT) users, English is a universal but second language. Given that much of the prior mutually-successful global communication efforts have been trade- or entertainment-oriented, we have not fully explored the efficacy of a universal language in a low-context environment such as the World Wide Web. This paper’s aim is to open a discussion on the multiple layers of cultural values and ambiguities embedded in the structure and content of the global English used in technologically mediated environments that cut across socio-cultural boundaries and contexts. The basic question: Is socio-culturally low-to-no-context communication by those who don’t otherwise know each other fundamentally and mutually meaningful?

La viabilité culturelle de l’anglais en tant que langue global a créé un sens universel dans la communication technologique intermédiaire. Pour la majorité des utilisateurs présents et futurs des technologies informationnelles et communicatives, l’anglais est la langue universelle bien qu’elle reste une seconde langue. Alors que beaucoup d’efforts de communications ayant avant eu un succès réciproque étaient basés sur le monde des affaires ou sur le monde du divertissement, nous n’avons pas complètement exploré l’efficacité d’une langue universelle dans un environnement tel que le réseau web. Le but de cette étude est de commencer une discussion sur les multiples couches de valeurs culturelles et des ambiguïtés encastrées dans la structure ainsi que dans le message utilisées dans l’anglais global dans les milieux technologiques. Ces milieux coupent à travers les confins socioculturels et les circonstances qui entourent cette communication. La question se pose : est-ce que la communication socioculturelle dans un contexte social peu élevé pour des gens qui autrement ne se connaisse ni mutuellement ni fondamentalement importante ?


Cultural Perceptions of Face Negotiation in Online Learning Environments

 

Charlotte N. Gunawardena

Sharon L. Walsh

Ethel M. Gregory

M. Yvonne Lake

Leslie E. Reddinger

The University of New Mexico

Abstract. This exploratory study examined cultural perceptions of face negotiation in an online learning environment by conducting face-to-face or online interviews with participants from six cultural groups. Utilizing a qualitative research design, it addressed the question: How do individuals from different cultural backgrounds negotiate “face” in a non-face-to-face learning environment? Results of interviews conducted with 16 participants representing 6 cultural groups indicated that cultural differences do exist in presentation and negotiation of “face” in the online learning environment. In evaluating responses to the three scenarios presented in this study, we found that regardless of cultural heritage, the majority of participants expressed the importance of establishing positive-face in an online course environment. They wanted to project a positive, knowledgeable image with association to dominating facework behavior. With regard to conflict behavior, responses were mixed and indicated cultural as well as individual differences. We believe that the results of this study can guide us in designing more inclusive online learning environments in the future.

Les perceptions culturelles dans les négociations personnelles parmi les milieux d'apprentissage en ligne. Pour la majorité des utilisateurs présents et futurs des technologies informationnelles et communicatives, l’anglais est la langue universelle bien qu’elle reste une seconde langue. Alors que beaucoup d’efforts de communications ayant avant eu un succès réciproque étaient basés sur le monde des affaires ou sur le monde du divertissement, nous n’avons pas complètement exploré l’efficacité d’une langue universelle dans un environnement tel que le réseau web. Le but de cette étude est de commencer une discussion sur les multiples couches de valeurs culturelles et des ambiguïtés encastrées dans la structure ainsi que dans le message utilisées dans l’anglais global dans les milieux technologiques. Ces milieux coupent à travers les confins socioculturels et les circonstances qui entourent cette communication. La question se pose : est-ce que la communication socioculturelle dans un contexte social peu élevé pour des gens qui autrement ne se connaisse ni mutuellement ni fondamentalement importante ?


Gender Differences in the Perception and Use of E-Mail in Two South African Organisations

 

Jean-Paul W. G. D. Van Belle

Adrie Stander

University of Cape Town

 

Abstract. The effect of user acceptance on system use has been researched extensively in the past and many models have been developed. The Technology Acceptance Model (TAM) is one such model that is based on the theory of reasoned actions in the information systems field. An extension to this model, researched by Gefen and Straub in 1997 includes the effect of gender on the model variables. They found that women perceive e-mail as more useful but more difficult to use than men do. The use of e-mail was found to be the same, regardless of gender. This study replicates the original study in two South African organizations: “older” knowledge workers in a commercial organization and younger students at our University. Our findings differ, depending on which sub-samples are considered. Overall, the difference which Gefen and Straub found in perceived ease-of-use and perceived social presence of e-mail appears no longer valid. These results could be explained through the use of non-parametric statistics or the specific demographics of the sample. Overall, however, there is a significant difference in perceived usefulness and, consequently, actual usage rates of e-mail. Our findings therefore, although not consistent with Gefen and Straub’s, seem to validate most of the TAM.

Les différences de gendres dans la perception et dans l'utilisation du courriel pour deux organisations en Afrique du Sud. Les effets d’acceptation par les utilisateurs des systèmes ont été recherchés de façons intenses dans le passé et beaucoup de modèles ont été développé. Le Modèle d’Acceptation Technologique (MAT) est l’un de ces modèles basé sur la théorie des actions raisonnées dans le domaine des systèmes d’informations. Une extension de ce modèle ayant été faite par Gefen et Straub en 1997 inclus l’effet du sexe sur les variabilités de ce modèle. Ils ont trouvé que les femmes perçoivent le courriel plus utile mais plus difficile a utilisé que les hommes. L’utilisation du courriel est le même quel que soit le sexe de l’utilisateur. Cette étude reproduit l’étude originale de deux organisations sud africaines : la « vieille » connaissance des travailleurs dans une organisation commerciale et de jeunes étudiants dans notre université. Nos conclusions diffèrent quand nous considérons quel panel est utilisé. En général, la différence que Gefen et Straub ont trouvée dans la perception de la facilité d’utilisation et de l’existence sociale du courriel n’apparaît plus valide. Ces résultats peuvent être expliqué par l’utilisation de statistiques non paramétriques ou bien par la démographie du panel. En générale, par contre, il existe une différence importante dans la perception de l’utilité du courriel et donc, dans son utilisation. Nos conclusions, bien que différentes que celles de Gefen et de Straub, ont l’air de corroborer celle du MAT.


A Qualitative Analysis of Online Group Process in Two Cultural Contexts

 

Penne L. Wilson, Ana C. Nolla, Charlotte N. Gunawardena

University of New Mexico

 

Jose R. López-Islas, Noemi Ramírez-Angel, Rosa M. Megchun-Alpírez

Universidad Virtual del Tec De Monterrey

Monterrey, Mexico

 

Abstract: Employing focus group data, this study examined if there are differences in perception of online group process between participants in Mexico and the United States of America (US). Focus group participants identified several factors that influence online group process: (1) language, (2) power distance, (3) gender differences, (4) collectivist vs. individualist tendencies, (5) conflict, (6) social presence, (7) time frame, and (8) technical skills.

Une analyse qualitative du processus de groupe en ligne dans deux contextes culturels. Cette étude examine s’il existe des différences de perception des processus de groupes en ligne entre les participants au Mexique et aux Etats-Unis. Les participants des groupes ont identifié plusieurs éléments qui influencent les processus de groupes en ligne : (1) la langue, (2) l’écart physique, (3) les différences de sexes, (4) la collectivité contre les tendances individuelles, (5) le conflit, (6) la présence sociale, (7) les structures du temps, (8) les compétences techniques.


Copyright 2005 Communication Institute for Online Scholarship, Inc.

This file may not be publicly distributed or reproduced without written permission of the Communication Institute for Online Scholarship,

P.O. Box 57, Rotterdam Jct., NY 12150 USA (phone: 518-887-2443).