Communication Institute for Online Scholarship
Communication Institute for Online
Scholarship Continous online service and innovation
since 1986
Site index
 
ComAbstracts Visual Communication Concept Explorer Tables of Contents Electronic Journal of Communication ComVista

Communication and the Accomplishment of Personal and Professional Life

EJC logo
The Electronic Journal of Communication / La Revue Electronique de Communication

Volume 16 Numbers 3 & 4, 2006

 

Communication and the Accomplishment of Personal and Professional Life

La Communication et les Réussites Personnelles et Professionnelles de la Vie

Editor/Editeur:

Erika Kirby
Creighton University

Editorial Preface/Préface Editoriale 

Erika Kirby
Creighton University


Communication and the accomplishment of personal and professional life: An introduction/La communication et les réussites personnelles et professionnelles de la vie: l'introduction

Erika Kirby
Creighton University

Research on Communication and the Accomplishment of Personal and Professional Life
La recherche sur la communication et les réussites personnelles et professionnelles de la vie

Sherianne Shuler
Creighton University

Annis Golden
University at Albany

Cheryl Geisler
Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute

Stay-at-home fathers: Masculinity, family, work, and gender stereotypes/Les pères qui restent à la maison : la masculinité, la famille, l'emploi, et les stéréotypes des sexes

David J. Petroski
Southern Connecticut State University

Paige P.Edley
Loyola Marymount University


The work-life relationship for "people with choices:" Women entrepreneurs as crystallized selves?/Le rapport emploie-vie pour "les gens avec des choix." Les femmes d'affaires idéales

Rebecca Gill

University of Utah

 

Reflections on Communication and the Accomplishment of Personal and Professional Life
Les réflexions sur la communication et les réussites de la vie personnelle et professionnelle

Crystallizing frames for work-life/La cristallisation du cadre de l'emploi et de la vie

Angela Trethewey

Sarah J. Tracy

Jess K. Alberts

Arizona State University

Pondering diverse work-life issues and developments over the lifespan/Peser sur les questions diverses de l'emploi et de la vie ainsi que des développements sur l'existence

Patrice M. Buzzanell

Purdue University 

Seeing work-life from children's standpoints/Voir l'emploi et la vie à travers les points de vue des enfants

Jane Jorgenson

University of South Florida

Storied learning at the crossroads of the personal and the public/Histoire d'apprentissage au croisement du particulier et du public

Lynn M. Harter

Ohio University

Accomplishing (Personal) Life by (Professionally) "Opting-Out"
Accomplir sa vie personnelle en se désengageant professionnellemen

Organizing (un)healthy dialectics of work-life balance: An organizational communication response to The Opt-Out Revolution/Organisé les dialectiques saines et malsaines de la balance de l'emploi et de la vie : une réponse communicative organisationnel pour la révolution de l'abandon 

Kelby K. Halone

University of Tennessee 

A hierarchy of family: A family communication response to The Opt-Out Revolution/Une hiérarchie de famille : une réponse familiale communicative sur la révolution de l'abandon

M. Chad McBride

Creighton University 

Discourses of careerism, separatism, and individualism: A work/life communication response to The Opt-Out Revolution/Les discours de carriérisme, de séparatisme, et d'individualisme : une réponse communicative de l'emploi et de la vie dans la révolution de l'abandon

Stacey M. Wieland

Villanova University

Of angst, anecdote, and anger: A gender communication response to The Opt-Out Revolution/L'angoisse existentielle, l'anecdote, et la colère : une réponse communicative de genre à la révolution de l'abandon

Mary-Jeanette Smythe

University of Missouri-Columbia

Communication and the Accomplishment of Personal

and Professional Life: Editorial Preface

Communication and the Accomplishment of Personal and Professional Life provides a forum for communication research broadly acknowledging that individuals have more than just a working existence. Workers have some form of personal life, and the intersections and divergences of personal and professional life are explored in three distinct parts of this special issue following an introductory essay by the editor.

Part I: Research on Communication and the Accomplishment of Personal and Professional Life is comprised of peer-reviewed empirical research articles that begin to stretch the boundaries of work-life research to incorporate diverse voices and contexts. Sherianne Shuler argues for a reconsideration of our conception of "organizations" in her case study of one home-based organization. Annis Golden and Cheryl Geisler study the practices of individuals who use personal digital assistants (PDAs) to manage flexible work and time, identifying their ideological dilemmas. Dave Petroski and Paige Edley look theoretically at the intersection of masculinity↔parenting-as-occupation from the perspective of their own lived experiences. Finally, Rebecca Gill examines the intersection of woman↔entrepreneur using the lens of the "crystallized self."

Part II: Reflections on Communication and the Accomplishment of Personal and Professional Life is a series of invited reflections on the dilemmas in conducting personal-professional communication scholarship. Angela Trethewey, Sarah Tracy, and Jess Alberts illustrate the ways common frames for these issues (including balance, conflict, roles, and wellness) tend to dichotomize and marginalize and offer the "crystallized self" as another frame. In her piece, Patrice Buzzanell "plays the academic" regarding research on workplace negotiations of work-life issues and yet concludes with some very personal reflections on her own personal work-life dilemmas. Jane Jorgenson takes a slightly narrower lens, proposing avenues for enlarging the themes of research on work-personal life relationships by bringing children into the foreground as subjects. Finally, Lynn Harter takes an even more focused look at issues of the personal and the professional in reflecting on her own life as a teacher-scholar.

Part III: Accomplishing (Personal) Life by (Professionally) "Opting-Out" provides six different communicative analyses of discourses of the "opt-out revolution" where career-driven women are leaving the workforce altogether to stay-at-home with children as detailed in The New York Times and a related online forum. Kelby Halone provides an organizational communication response, evidencing a macro-level dialectic of "having a life"↔"living one's life." Chad McBride then crafts a family communication response where he illustrates the hierarchy of the good "family." Stacey Wieland creates a work/life communication response exploring "opting-out" and "balancing" as micro-level discourses as to how to successfully manage tensions between work and other parts of life. Mary Jeanette (M. J.) Smythe then offers a gendered communication response, exploring some of the features of the article and the online postings that function as markers of gendered discourse. Phyllis Japp offers a cultural studies response, considering five components of ideological construction and maintenance present in the discourse and then analyzing the online postings for indications of counterstories. Jennifer Simpson and Erika Kirby offer a White privilege/social class response, challenging the language of personal "choice" on grounds that it masks institutional and systemic forces. Finally, Timothy Kuhn provides an integrative essay to tie these pieces together as they inform not only the opt-out revolution, but communication theorizing in general.

Taken together, the three parts of this special issue not only summarize but further our theorizing on Communication and the Accomplishment of Personal and Professional Life. I appreciate the invitation from Teresa Harrison to edit this issue, and the assistance of the editorial board in reviewing submissions. I hope you enjoy reading this issue, not only as the pieces contribute to your own professional life but to your personal life as well.


L'introduction de l'édition : La communication et les réussites personnelles et professionnelles de la vie

La communication et les réussites personnelles et professionnelles de la vie offrent une assemblée pour la recherche en communication qui reconnaît que les gens ont une vie en dehors du travail. Les travailleurs ont une vie personnelle. Les croisements et les divergences de la vie personnelle et professionnelle sont explorés dans les trois parties distinctes de cette édition venant après un essai préliminaire par l'éditeur

Première partie : La recherche sur la communication et les réussites personnelles et professionnelles de la vie comportent des recherches d'articles concrets qui commencent à élargir les limites de la recherche de l'emploi et de la vie afin d'incorporer des voix et des contextes divers. Sherianne Shuler argumente que nos conceptions des organisations soient reconsidérer dans son étude d'une organisation basée à la maison. Annis Golden et Cheryl Geisler étudient les pratiques des individus qui utilisent les PDA afin de gérer l'emploi et le temps flexibles tout en identifiant leurs dilemmes idéologiques. Dave Petroski et Paige Edley regardent de façon théorique la relation complexe entre masculinité et parenté comme occupation à travers la perspective de leurs propres expériences vécus. Enfin, Rebecca Gill examine la relation femme↔entrepreneur en utilisant comme objectif la cristallisation du soi.

Deuxième partie : Les réflexions sur la communication et les réussites de la vie personnelle et professionnelle sont une série de réflexions sur les dilemmes de directions personnelles et professionnelles des bourses d'études sur la communication. Angela Trethewey, Sarah Tracy et Jess Alberts illustrent les façons dont les points en commun de ces sujets (tels que la balance, le conflit, les rôles et le bien-être) ont tendance à dichotomiser et à marginaliser et offrent la cristallisation du soi comme autre sujet. Dans son extrait, Patrice Buzzanell joue l'universitaire vis-à-vis de sa recherche au sujet des négociations du lieu de travail sur les problèmes de vie et d'emploi. Cependant, elle conclut avec des réflexions très personnelles de ses dilemmes de vie et d'emploi. Jane Jorgenson prend un objectif un peu plus restreint en proposant des avenues pour élargir les thèmes de recherches des rapports emploi-vie privée en mettant des enfants en premier plan comme sujets. Finalement, Lynn Harter prend un chemin encore plus restreint en discutant du personnelle et du professionnelle à travers les réflexions de sa propre vie en tant qu'enseignante et universitaire.

Troisième partie : Accomplir sa vie personnelle en se désengageant professionnellement offre six analyses communicatives différentes de discussions de cette " révolution d'abandon " où les femmes professionnelles quittent leur emploi pour rester chez elles avec leurs enfants comme l'a détaillé le New York Times et un forum en ligne. Kelby Halone offre une réponse communicative organisationnelle montrant en évidence la dialectique " d'avoir une vie " et de " vivre sa vie. " Chad McBride établit une réponse communicative familiale où il illustre la hiérarchie de la bonne famille. Stacey Wieland créé une réponse communicative sur l'emploi et la vie en explorant le désengagement et l'équilibre qui peut exister dans les discussions et comment gérer avec succès les tensions qui existent entre l'emploi et les autres parties de la vie. Mary Jeanette Smythe ensuite nous offre une réponse communicative de genre en explorant certains des traits de l'article et des affichages en ligne qui fonctionnent comme repères dans le discours du genre. Phyllis Japp offre une réponse d'études culturelles en considérant cinq éléments de constructions et de maintiens idéologiques présents dans le discours et ensuite analyse les affichages en ligne pour des indications contradictoires. Jennifer Simpson et Erika Kirby offrent une réponse basée sur la classe sociale privilégiée des blancs mettant en question le choix personnel du langage du point de vue qu'il masque des forces institutionnelles et systémiques. Finalement, Timothy Kuhn nous offre un essai qui met tous ces morceaux ensembles car ils nous informent non seulement de cette révolution d'abandon mais aussi de la théorisation de la communication en générale.

Pris ensemble, les trois parties de cette édition spéciale non seulement résument mais aussi avance notre théorisation sur la communication et les réussites personnelles et professionnelles de la vie. J'apprécie l'invitation de Teresa Harrison d'éditer cette édition, ainsi que l'assistance du comité éditorial à revoir les propositions soumises. Je souhaite que vous allez aimer lire cette édition non seulement pour les morceaux qui contribuent à votre vie professionnelle mais aussi à votre vie personnelle


Communication and the Accomplishment of Personal and Professional Life:
An Introduction

Erika L. Kirby
Creighton University


Working at Home as Total Institution: Maintaining and Undermining the Public/Private Dichotomy

Sherianne Shuler
Creighton University

Abstract. Scholarship in organizational communication has typically focused on traditional conceptions of organization, where members leave home in the private sphere to “go to work” in the public sphere, ignoring the growing number of people who do home-based work. Bringing together J. Barker’s (1993, 1999) work on concertive control with Goffman’s (1961) analysis of total institutions, this case study of one home-based organization examines how members both maintain and undermine the public/private dichotomy that underpins their professional and personal lives in notions of “work” and “home”. Participants in this study resist the pull of the total institution in home-based work by maintaining “boundaries” and yet sometimes, through concertive control, succumb to the total institution and undermine the public/private dichotomy. Findings have implications for the public/private dichotomy, redefinitions of work and home, concertive control, total institutions, and further discussion about what constitutes a “normal job.”

Travailler à la maison comme établissement complet : Maintenir et discréditer la dichotomie du public et privée. Les bourses d'études dans la communication organisationnelle sont typiquement centrées sur les conceptions traditionnelles de l'organisation où les membres quittent la maison dans la sphère privée " pour aller travailler " dans la sphère publique ignorant de ce fait la pleine croissance du nombre de gens qui travaille de leur maison. En joignant les œuvres de J. Barker (1993, 1999) sur le contrôle de la concertation avec l'analyse des institutions totales de Goffman (1961), l'étude de cette organisation basée à partir de la maison examine comment les membres maintiennent et ébranlent cette dichotomie du public et du privée qui soutient leurs vies personnelles et professionnelles dans les notions du " travail " et de la " maison ". Les participants de cette étude résistent à l'attirance totale du travail basé de la maison grâce au maintien d'une ligne de démarcation. Parfois, le contrôle de la concertation succombe aux institutions totalitaires et de ce fait ébranle la dichotomie du public et du privé. Les conclusions ont des implications pour la dichotomie du public et du privé, de nouvelles définitions pour la maison et le travail, le contrôle de la concertation, les institutions totalitaires, et ceux que constitue un " emploi normal ".


Flexible Work, Time, and Technology: Ideological Dilemmas of Managing Work-Life Interrelationships Using Personal Digital Assistants

Annis G. Golden
University at Albany

Cheryl Geisler
Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute 

Abstract. Flexible work arrangements represent a common organizational strategy for meeting workers’ desire for work-life accommodations. Such arrangements, however, create the need for greater self-management and time management on the part of workers who engage in them. Consequently, flexible work has been variously construed as empowering, exploitative, or dilemmatic. This study examines the technological and interpretive practices of knowledge workers who use personal digital assistants (PDAs) as tools to manage flexible work and time. We identify ideological dilemmas presented by both flexible work itself and the material and discursive practices knowledge workers draw upon in managing flexible work and work-life interrelationships.

 

L'emploi flexible, le temps et la technologie: des dilemmes idéologiques pour gérer les relations du travail et de la vie personnelle en utilisant les PDA. Les arrangements d'emploi flexible représentent une stratégie organisationnelle commune pour satisfaire les désirs des employés dans leurs recherches d'adaptations pour leurs vies professionnelles et personnelles. Néanmoins, de tels arrangements créent le besoin d'une meilleure gestion personnelle et d'une meilleure gestion du temps de la part de ces employés qui s'y engagent. De ce fait, l'emploi flexible a été interprété comme aidant les gens à s'assumer, a être exploitant, ou encore dilemmatique. Cette étude examine la technologie et les usages interprétatifs des connaissances du travailleur qui utilise les PDA comme outils afin de gérer l'emploi flexible et le temps. Nous identifions les dilemmes idéologiques présentés par l'emploi flexible lui-même et le matériel et les pratiques discursives que les travailleurs prennent afin de gérer l'emploi flexible et les relations professionnelles avec le cours de la vie.


Stay-At-Home Fathers: Masculinity, Family, Work, and Gender Stereotypes

David J. Petroski
Southern Connecticut State University

Paige P. Edley
Loyola Marymount University

Abstract: This paper examines the stay-at-home father and how society responds to nontraditional gendered family roles. We explore the concept from our own lived experience and theorize the complex notion of fatherhood among nontraditional gender roles, work, and caregiving responsibilities. The first author (Dave) was a stay-at-home father while writing his doctoral dissertation and during his search for a full-time faculty position. The second author (Paige) experienced the phenomenon through her spouse’s role as stay-at-home father after corporate downsizing. Together we theorize the intersections of power, gender, work, family, and identity from the standpoint of the stay-at-home father and question how masculinity, fatherhood, family dynamics, work, and society’s resistance to nontraditional gender roles are produced and reproduced in everyday life.

Les pères qui restent à la maison : la masculinité, la famille, l'emploi, et les stéréotypes des sexes. Cet article examine le père qui reste à la maison et examine comment la société répond aux rôles de famille non-traditionnels. Nous explorons le concept de notre propre expérience vécue et nous théorisons la notion complexe du père parmi les rôles de sexes non-traditionnels, du travail, et des responsabilités d'être responsable de ses enfants. Le premier auteur (Dave) était un père qui était resté à la maison pendant l'écriture de sa dissertation de doctorat et pendant sa recherche d'un emploi à plein temps dans l'enseignement supérieur. Le deuxième auteur (Paige) à fait l'expérience de ce phénomène à travers le rôle de son époux comme père restant à la maison après son licenciement. Ensemble ils ont théorisé sur les intersections du pouvoir, de l'emploi, de la famille, et de l'identité à travers le rôle du père et questionne comment la masculinité, la paternité, les dynamiques familiales, le travail, et la résistance de la société envers les rôles non-traditionnels sont produits et reproduits dans la vie de tous les jours.


The Work-Life Relationship for "People With Choices:" Women Entrepreneurs As Crystallized Selves?

Rebecca Gill

University of Utah

Abstract. Entrepreneurship in United States culture has been idealized as offering a flexible organizational identity, but has also been critiqued as subjecting individuals to organizationally preferred identities. An examination of work and life experiences for women entrepreneurs offers insight into the work-life relationship for people who ostensibly have more freedom and flexibility to make choices as to how to shape their material work-life as well as their work-life identity. In this empirical study, I apply Tracy and Trethewey’s (2005) theoretical concept of the crystallized self to explore the viability of entrepreneurship as a “solution” to work-life tensions and to draw out how women entrepreneurs discursively frame and manage their work-life relationship. I conclude that the crystallized self is evident in some women entrepreneurs’ conceptualizations of self, though they do not yet have a language to adequately express this. In addition, women entrepreneurs who over-identified with their businesses moved beyond the crystallized identity to experience a dis/integrated identity.

Le rapport emploie-vie pour "les gens avec des choix." Les femmes d'affaires idéales. L'esprit d'entreprise dans la culture aux Etats-Unis a été idéalisé comme offrant une identité organisationnelle flexible, mais elle a aussi été critiquée pour soumettre les individus dans des identités préférées par les organismes. Un examen du travail et des expériences de la vie pour les femmes entrepreneurs offrent un aperçu dans les rapports marginaux des relations de la vie et du travail pour les gens qui ont apparemment plus de liberté et plus de flexibilité à faire des choix qui façonnent l'identité de leur vie et de leur emploi. Dans cette étude concrète, j'utilise les théories conceptuelles de Tracy et Trethewey (2005) qui explorent la viabilité de l'esprit d'entreprise comme solution aux tensions de vie et d'emploi afin d'esquisser comment les femmes d'entreprises cadrent et gèrent leurs relations professionnelles et personnelles. Je conclus que cette cristallisation du soi est évidente dans la conceptualisation du soi de certaines femmes d'entreprises bien qu'elles n'ont pas un langage pour l'exprimer clairement. De plus, les femmes d'entreprises qui s'identifient trop dans leurs emplois dépassent leurs identités et vivent une identité déstructurée.


Crystallizing Frames For Work-Life

Angela Trethewey
Sarah J. Tracy
Jess K. Alberts
Arizona State University
 

Abstract. In responding to the editor’s invitation to “consider the inherent difficulty of communicating about our differing life-realms of experience (e.g., public-private, work-family, work-life, personal-professional, etc.),” we illustrate the ways common frames for these issues—-including balance, conflict, roles, and wellness—tend to dichotomize and marginalize. We offer the “crystallized self” (Tracy & Trethewey, 2005) as another frame for discussion in that a crystallized approach suggests that challenges in managing multiple identities are diverse and not all-of-a-kind.

La cristallisation du cadre de l'emploi et de la vie. En répondant à l'invitation du directeur de l'édition à " considérer les difficultés implicites à communiquer de nos expériences humaines différentes (par exemple : le public et le privée, l'emploi et la famille, l'emploi et la vie, le personnel et le professionnel, etc.) ", nous illustrons les façons pour lesquelles les cadrages de ces problèmes - comprenant l'équilibre, le conflit, les rôles, et le bien-être - ont tendances à dichotomiser et à marginaliser les gens. Nous offrons " la cristallisation du soi " (Tracy et Trethewey, 2005) comme un autre cadre pour la discussion dans le sens que cette approche suggère que les problèmes à gérer des identités multiples sont diverses et non pas les mêmes.


Pondering Diverse Work-Life Issues and Developments Over the Lifespan

Patrice M. Buzzanell
Purdue University
 

Abstract: In responding to the editor’s invitation to “consider the inherent difficulty of communicating about our differing life-realms of experience (e.g., public-private, work-family, work-life, personal-professional, etc.),” I first “play the academic” in (a) providing an overview of some academic research and community practice on workplace negotiations and (b) laying out some of the overarching macrodiscourses that can prevent innovative thinking about work-life solutions. I conclude with some personal reflections on my own work-life dilemmas.

Peser sur les questions diverses de l'emploi et de la vie ainsi que des développements sur l'existence. En répondant à l'invitation du directeur de l'édition à " considérer les difficultés inhérentes de communiquer sur nos différentes expériences du monde de la vie (par exemple : le public et le privée, l'emploi et la famille, l'emploi et la vie, le personnel et le professionnel, etc.) ", je commence en jouant l'universitaire en offrant une vue d'ensemble de certaines recherches académiques et de pratiques communautaires sur les négociations des lieux du travail. Ensuite, j'offre une question que tout le monde se pose sur le discours macro qui peut empêcher la pensée innovatrice pour des solutions sur l'emploi et la vie. Je conclus avec des réflexions très personnelles sur mes dilemmes d'emploi et de vie.


Seeing Work-Life from Children's Standpoints

Jane Jorgenson
University of South Florida
 

Abstract: In responding to the editor’s invitation to “consider the inherent difficulty of communicating about our differing life-realms of experience (e.g., public-private, work-family, work-life, personal-professional, etc.),” I propose some avenues for enlarging the themes of research on work-personal life relationships by bringing children into the foreground as subjects. I explore (a) the meaning and experience of time in children’s everyday lives as well as (b) children’s performance of unpaid labor in their households.

Voir l'emploi et la vie à travers les points de vue des enfants. En répondant à l'invitation du directeur de l'édition à " considérer les difficultés inhérentes de communiquer sur nos différentes expériences du monde de la vie (par exemple : le public et le privée, l'emploi et la famille, l'emploi et la vie, le personnel et le professionnel, etc.) ", je propose des avenues afin d'élargir les thèmes de recherche des relations d'emploi et de vie personnelle en mettant des enfants comme sujets au premier plan. J'explore (a) la signification et l'expérience du temps dans la vie de tout les jours des enfants ainsi que (b) la conduite des enfants dans leurs emplois non-rémunérer à l'intérieur de leurs maisons.


Storied Learning at the Crossroads of the Personal and the Public

Lynn M. Harter
Ohio University

Abstract: In responding to the editor’s invitation to “consider the inherent difficulty of communicating about our differing life-realms of experience (e.g., public-private, work-family, work-life, personal-professional, etc.),” I look at issues of the personal and the professional by reflecting on my own life as a teacher-scholar through a lens of storied learning. I explore three concerns of intertextuality, identity construction, and indeterminancy that emerge in teaching and learning with narrative sensibilities. I conclude with cautions and questions for individuals who construct their scholarly lives in this way since learning at the crossroads of the personal and public can be a risky, and even fragile, endeavor.

Histoire d'apprentissage au croisement du particulier et du public. En répondant à l'invitation du directeur de l'édition à " considérer les difficultés inhérentes de communiquer sur nos différentes expériences du monde de la vie (par exemple : le public et le privée, l'emploi et la famille, l'emploi et la vie, le personnel et le professionnel, etc.) ", je regarde les problèmes du particulier et du professionnel en reflétant ma propre vie en tant qu'enseignante et intellectuelle à travers un regard d'apprentissage. J'explore trois préoccupations d'intertextualité, d'interprétation identitaire, et d'indétermination qui émergent dans l'enseignement et l'apprentissage avec des sensibilités narratives. Je conclus avec prudences et avec des questions pour ces gens qui construisent leurs vies intellectuelles de cette façon car apprendre au croisement du particulier et du public peut être une tentative risqué et fragile.


Organizing (Un)Healthy Dialectics of Work-Life Balance: An Organizational Communication Response to The Opt-Out Revolution

Kelby K. Halone
University of Tennessee

Abstract: This essay adopts the lens of organizational communication for responding to discourses of The Opt-Out Revolution. In providing a response, I (a) expose a macro-level dialectic of “having a life”↔“living one’s life” present in the discourse that affects how individuals interactively organize their everyday lives, and (b) illustrate how micro-level processes of organizing within this macro-level dialectic are tied into disciplinary organizational communication problematics of voice, rationality, organization, and the organization-society relationship.

Organisé les dialectiques saines et malsaines de la balance de l'emploi et de la vie : une réponse communicative organisationnel pour La révolution de l'abandon. Cet essai adopte l'objectif de communication organisationnel afin de répondre aux discours de La révolution de l'abandon. En apportant une réponse, j'offre (a) une dialectique au niveau macro " d'avoir une vie " et de " vivre sa vie " présent dans le discours qui influence comment les gens s'organisent interactivement dans leurs vies de tout les jours. J'illustre (b) comment les processus d'organisation à l'intérieur même de cette dialectique sont attachés dans l'organisation communicative des problèmes de voix, de rationalité, d'organisation, ainsi que la relation qui existe entre organisation et société.


A Hierarchy of Family: A Family Communication Response to The Opt-Out Revolution

M. Chad McBride
Creighton University

Abstract: This essay adopts the lens of family communication for responding to discourses of The Opt-Out Revolution. In providing a response, I argue a hierarchy of family is present by exploring (a) the construction of motherhood, (b) the (re)framing of choice vs. responsibility of motherhood, (c) the limited construction of fatherhood, and (d) the hierarchy of good “family.”

Une hiérarchie de famille : une réponse familiale communicative sur La révolution de l'abandon. Cet essai adopte l'objectif de communication organisationnel afin de répondre aux discours de La révolution de l'abandon. En donnant une réponse, j'argumente qu'une hiérarchie familiale existe en explorant (a) la structure de la maternité, (b) l'encadrement du choix contre les responsabilités de la maternité, (c) la structure limitée de la paternité, et (d) la hiérarchie de la bonne " famille ".


Discourses of careerism, separatism, and individualism: A work/life communication response to The Opt-Out Revolution

Stacey M. Wieland
Villanova University

Abstract: This essay adopts the lens of work/life communication for responding to discourses of The Opt-Out Revolution. In providing a response, I (a) explore “opting-out” and “balancing” as micro-level discourses as to how to successfully manage tensions between work and other parts of life and (b) reflect on the Discourses that are necessary for each to be compelling. I conclude that the discourse of opting out implicitly affirms an ideology of careerism, while the discourse of balancing implicitly affirms an ideology of separatism—and that both discourses affirm an ideology of individualism.

Les discours de carriérisme, de séparatisme, et d'individualisme : une réponse communicative de l'emploi et de la vie dans La révolution de l'abandon. Cet essai adopte l'objectif de communication organisationnel afin de répondre aux discours de La révolution de l'abandon. En offrant une réponse, j'explore (a) " l'abandon " et " l'équilibre " des discours au niveau micro afin de réussir à gérer les tensions qui existent entre le travail et les autres parties de la vie et (b) je réfléchis aux discours nécessaires pour chacun d'être irréfutable. Je conclus que le discours de l'abandon affirme implicitement une idéologie de carriérisme, pendant que le discours d'équilibre affirme implicitement une idéologie de séparatisme - et que les deux discours affirment une idéologie d'individualisme.


Of Angst, Anecdote, and Anger: A Gender Communication Response to The Opt-Out Revolution

Mary-Jeanette Smythe
University of Missouri-Columbia

Abstract: This essay adopts the lens of gender(ed) communication for responding to discourses of The Opt-Out Revolution. In providing a response, I explore some of the features of the article and the online postings that function as markers of gendered discourse. In addition to considering attributes that define feminine discourse communities, I consider two emergent themes of (a) women’s stereotyping of each other and (b) “the biology/destiny redux.”

L'angoisse existentielle, l'anecdote, et la colère : une réponse communicative de genre à La révolution de l'abandon. Cet essai adopte l'objectif de communication du genre afin de répondre aux discours de La révolution de l'abandon. En offrant une réponse, j'explore certaines des caractéristiques de cet article ainsi que des affichages en ligne qui fonctionnent comme point de repère dans le discours du genre. De plus que de considérer les attributs qui définissent les discours des communautés féminines, je considère deux thèmes émergeant (a) des femmes se stéréotypant et (b) " la biologie et la destinée du retour ".


Mothering in the Sudan and at Starbucks: A cultural studies response to The Opt-Out Revolution

Phyllis M. Japp
University of Nebraska at Lincoln

Abstract: This essay adopts the lens of cultural studies for responding to discourses of The Opt-Out Revolution. In providing a response, I (a) consider five components of ideological construction and maintenance present in the article (master narratives, definitions, agencies, connections/disconnections, and silences) and then (b) analyze the online postings for indications of counterstories.

Materner au Soudan et à Starbucks : une réponse d'étude culturelle pour La révolution de l'abandon. Cet essai adopte l'objectif des études culturelles afin de répondre aux discours de La révolution de l'abandon. En offrant une réponse, je (a) considère cinq éléments de construction idéologique et d'entretien présent dans l'article (les narrations maîtres, les définitions, les agences, les connexions/déconnexions, et les silences) et enfin (b) analyser les affichages en ligne pour des indications de réfutation.


"Choices" for Whom?: A White Privilege/Social Class Communicative Response The Opt-Out Revolution

Jennifer Lyn Simpson
University of Colorado at Boulder

Erika L. Kirby
Creighton University

Abstract: This essay adopts the lens of White privilege/social class for responding to discourses of The Opt-Out Revolution. In providing a response, we challenge the language of personal “choice” on grounds that it masks institutional and systemic forces by (a) creating invisible identities that dismiss class and “e-race” race and (b) leaving invisible the institutions of marriage, family, and “responsibility.”

Le choix pour qui ? La réponse communicative de la classe sociale privilégiée des blancs pour La révolution de l'abandon. Cet essai adopte l'objectif de la classe sociale privilégiée des blancs afin de répondre aux discours de La révolution de l'abandon. En offrant une réponse, nous mettons en question le choix personnel du langage du point de vue qu'il masque des forces institutionnelles et systémiques en (a) créant des identités invisibles qui rejettent les classes sociales et la race et (b) laisse invisible les institutions du mariage, de la famille, et des responsabilités.


Identity, Discourse, and Community in The Opt-Out Revolution: A Concluding Essay

Timothy Kuhn
University of Colorado at Boulder

Abstract: This essay serves to integrate the six responses to discourses of The Opt-Out Revolution by tying these pieces together as they inform not only the opt-out revolution, but communication theorizing in general. In advancing themes across the essays, I (a) highlight common concerns related to identity construction; (b) analyze the discursive “tools” that surfaced and explores the consequences of these; and (c) suggest an agenda for theory and intervention in communication scholarship.

L'identité, le discours, et la communauté dans La révolution de l'abandon : un essai final. Cet essai sert à intégrer les six réponses des discours de La révolution de l'abandon en mettant ensemble tout ces morceaux puisqu'ils nous informent non seulement sur cette révolution de l'abandon mais aussi sur la théorisation de la communication en général. En avançant les thèmes à travers les essais, j'ai (a) souligné les préoccupations communes ayant avoir avec la construction de l'identité ; j'ai (b) analysé les " outils " discursifs qui ont fait surface et j'ai exploré les conséquences de ceux-ci ; et j'ai (c) suggéré un programme


Copyright 2006 Communication Institute for Online Scholarship, Inc.

This file may not be publicly distributed or reproduced without written permission of the Communication Institute for Online Scholarship,

P.O. Box 57, Rotterdam Jct., NY 12150 USA (phone: 518-887-2443).