Communication Institute for Online Scholarship
Communication Institute for Online
Scholarship Continous online service and innovation
since 1986
Site index
 
ComAbstracts Visual Communication Concept Explorer Tables of Contents Electronic Journal of Communication ComVista

Communicative Ecologies

 

EJC logo
The Electronic Journal of Communication / La Revue Electronique de Communication

Volume 17 Numbers 1& 2, 2007

 

 Communicative Ecologies

Les écologies communicatives

Editors/Editeurs:

Greg Hearn and Marcus Foth
Queensland University of Technology
Brisbane, Australia

Editorial Preface/Préface Editoriale 

Greg Hearn and Marcus Foth
Queensland University of Technology


Comparing the communicative ecologies of geo-ethnic communities: How people stay on top of their community/ Comparer les écologies de communication des communautés ethniques et géographiques: comment les gens restent au courant dans leurs communautés

Holley A. Wilkin
Georgia State University

Sandra J. Ball-Rokeach
University of Southern California

Matthew D. Matsaganis
University of Southern California

Pauline Hope Cheong
State University of New York, Buffalo

Chris Shepherd
Michael Arnold
Craig Bellamy
Martin Gibbs
University of Melbourne

Mary Ann Allison
Hofstra University

“No mobs -- No confusions—No tumult”: Networking civil disobedience/"Pas de foule - Pas de confusion - Pas de tumulte" : le réseau de la désobéissance civile

Jennifer A. Peeples
Bentley Mitchell
Utah State University


An ecology of public Internet access: Exploring contextual Internet access in an urban community/Une écologie de l'accès public à Internet : l'exploration contextuelle à l'accès Internet dans une communauté urbaine

Alison Powell

Concordia University


Communicative Ecologies: Editorial Preface

The term 'ecology' has a lot to offer communication research. This biological analogy opens up research into time and space dynamics, population growth and lifecycles, networks, clusters, niches, and even power relationships between prey and predators. The research perspective may be at either holistic (macro) or individual (micro) levels of analysis. In McLuhan and Postman's tradition of media ecology the concept takes a media-centric view referring to the way in which media structure our lives and how they influence society. The focus of this special issue, the concept of 'communicative ecology', is different insofar as we put an increased emphasis on the meaning that can be derived from the socio-cultural framing and analysis of the local context which communication occurs in. We define a communicative ecology as a milieu of agents who are connected in various ways by various exchanges of mediated and unmediated forms of communication (Tacchi et al., 2003 ). From a communicative ecology perspective each instance of media use is considered at both individual and community level as part of a complex media environment that is socially and culturally framed. We do not limit the scope of analysis to traditional print, broadcast and telecommunication media but include social networking applications for peer to peer modes of communication, transport infrastructure that enable face to face interaction, as well as public and private places where people meet, chat, gossip.

We conceive of a communicative ecology as having three layers (Foth & Hearn, 2007). A technological layer which consists of the devices and connecting media that enable communication and interaction. A social layer which consists of people and social modes of organising those people - which might include, for example, everything from friendship groups to more formal community organizations, as well as companies or legal entities. And finally, a discursive layer which is the content of communication - that is, the ideas or themes that constitute the known social universe that the ecology operates in.

Using an ecological metaphor opens up a number of interesting possibilities for analyzing place-based communication (e.g., in neighbourhoods, apartment buildings, or - on a larger scale - suburbs and cities). It can help us to better understand the ways social activities are organized, the ways people define and experience their environments, and the implications for social order and organization. For example, in analyzing an apartment complex, an ecological metaphor might suggest first examining the features of the population in the apartment and mapping the patterns of engagement within that population. In addition we could ask how people relate to different places within the apartment, and how this interaction is mediated by the use of technology. Do different groups form around a coffee shop? Do email or cell phone connections define other ecologies? Then we might also be able to study transactions between different ecologies. The ecological metaphor focuses on whole of system interactions. It also enables us to define boundaries of any given ecology, and to examine how the coherence of that boundary and the stability of each ecology is maintained. What topics of conversation define insiders and outsiders in the ecology? Finally, it also opens up the question of the social sustainability of a communicative ecology.

Similar sorts of questions have been asked by the contributors to this special issue who research human communication phenomena in various place-based contexts. The first article "Comparing the Communication Ecologies of Geo-ethnic Communities: How People Stay on Top of Their Community" by Wilkin et al. highlight the benefits to be gained from a communicative ecology approach by presenting a communication map to help communicate with ethnically diverse populations. Shepherd et al. follow with their contribution "The Material Ecologies of Domestic ICTs" which examines the socio-cultural context of the media and communication environments we create in our homes. The next article "Primary Attention Groups: A Conceptual Aproach to the Communicative Ecology of Individual Community in the Information Age" by Allison applies the layer model described above to analyse individual social groupings. Peeples and Mitchell also found the layer model useful in exploring the 1999 WTO protests in "No Mobs - No Confusions - No Tumult: Organizing Civil Disobedience". Powell's article "An Ecology of Public Internet Access: Exploring contextual internet access in an urban community" concludes this special issue by offering a detailed account of the role public internet access plays in the communicative ecology of inner-city residents.

We thank our colleagues for their help and assistance in providing an extraordinary high quality of peer review for this special issue of EJC: Corey Anton, Grand Valley State University; Elija Cassidy, Queensland University of Technology; Christy Collis, Queensland University of Technology; Victor Gonzalez, University of Manchester; Phil Graham, Queensland University of Technology; Joshua Green, Massachusetts Institute of Technology; Deborah Jones, Victoria University of Wellington; Jesper Kjeldskov, Aalborg University; Mark Latonero, California State University, Fullerton; Graham Longford, University of Toronto; Harvey May, Queensland University of Technology; Lucy Montgomery, University of Westminster; Tanya Notley, Queensland University of Technology; Christine Satchell, University of Melbourne; Larry Stillman, Monash University; Jo Tacchi, Queensland University of Technology; Wallace Taylor, Cape Peninsula University of Technology; Tommaso Venturini, University of Milano - Bicocca. Our work is supported under the Australian Research Council's Discovery funding scheme (project number DP0663854) and Dr Marcus Foth is the recipient of an ARC Australian Postdoctoral Fellowship.

Foth, M., & Hearn, G. (2007, forthcoming). Networked individualism of urban residents: Discovering the communicative ecology in inner-city apartment complexes. Information, Communication & Society, 10(5).

Tacchi, J., Slater, D., & Hearn, G. (2003). Ethnographic action research handbook. New Delhi, India: UNESCO.


L'introduction de l'édition : Les écologies communicatives

Le terme "écologie" a bien des choses à offrir la recherche sur la communication. Cette analogie biologique ouvre la recherche dans le temps et les dynamiques de l'espace, dans la croissance de la population et des cycles de vie, les réseaux, les groupes de personnes, les niches, ainsi que les relations de puissance entre proies et prédateurs. La perspective de la recherche peut être soit holistique (macro) ou individuelle (micro) quand aux niveaux d'analyses. Dans la tradition de l'écologie médiatique de McLuhan et de Postman, le concept prend une vision centrée sur le média qui réfère sur la façon dont le média structure nos vies et influence notre société. Le point principal de cette édition spéciale, le concept de " l'écologie communicative ", est différent du point de vue que nous mettons une emphase sur le sens qui peut être pris dans l'encadrement socioculturel et l'analyse d'un contexte local dans lesquels la communication existe. Nous définissons une écologie communicative comme un milieu de représentants qui sont liés de façons différentes par des échanges de communication qui sont ou pas médiatisés (Tacchi et al, 2003). A partir d'une perspective d'écologie communicative, chaque cas d'utilisation médiatique est considéré au niveau individuel et communautaire faisant partie d'un environnement médiatique qui est cadré socialement et culturellement. Nous ne limitons pas l'analyse aux livres, aux médias d'émissions ou de télécommunications. Nous incluons les applications des réseaux d'applications sociaux des modes de communication, des infrastructures qui permettent les interactions de face à face, de même que les endroits public et privé où les gens se rencontrent, parle et discute.

Nous concevons l'écologie communicative comme ayant trois couches (Foth & Hearn, 2007. Une première couche technologique qui consiste aux moyens ainsi qu'aux branchements électroniques qui permettent l'interaction et la communication. Deuxièmement, une couche sociale qui consiste de gens et de modes sociales d'organiser ces gens qui peut tout inclure, par exemple, depuis des groupes d'amitiés aux organisations communautaires ainsi qu'à des sociétés ou des entités légales. Et troisièmement, une couche discursive qui est le fond de la communication. C'est-à-dire les idées ou les thèmes qui constituent l'univers social connue dans lequel l'écologie fonctionne.

L'utilisant d'une métaphore écologique offre un nombre de possibilités intéressantes pour analyser la communication basée sur l'endroit, comme par exemple les voisinages, les bâtiments, ou encore les villes et les banlieues. Cette métaphore peut nous aider à mieux comprendre comment les activités sociales sont organisées, les façons dont les gens définissent et ressentent leurs environnement, ainsi que les implications pour l'ordre social et pour les organisations. Par exemple, en analysant une résidence, une métaphore écologique peut suggérer en premier d'examiner les caractéristiques des gens de la résidence et de voir le genre d'engagement de cette population. Qui de plus est, nous pouvons aussi demander comment les gens lient les différents endroits de cette résidence et comment cette interaction est médiatisée par l'utilisation de la technologie. Est-ce que différent groupes se construisent dans un café ? Est-ce que les messages électroniques ou les portables définissent d'autres écologies ? Nous pouvons aussi être en mesure d'étudier les transactions entre différentes écologies. La métaphore écologique a comme objectif un système entier d'interactions. Cela nous permet de définir les confins de n'importe quelle écologie et d'examiner comment la cohérence de ses confins et la stabilité de chaque écologie sont maintenues. Quels sujets de conversation définissent l'initié et l'étranger de cette écologie ? Enfin, la question de viabilité sociale d'une écologie communicative s'ouvre.

D'autres questions du même ordre ont été posées par les gens qui ont contribués à cette publication spéciale et qui font de la recherche dans les phénomènes de communication humaine dans des contextes d'emplacements variés. Le premier article intitulé " Comparer les écologies de communication des communautés ethniques et géographiques: comment les gens restent au courant dans leurs communautés " par Wilkin et al. souligne les avantages à obtenir d'une approche écologique communicative en présentant une carte de communication qui permet de communiquer avec diverse population ethniques. Shepherd et al. continuent avec leur contribution " Les écologies matérielles des ICT domestiques " qui examinent le contexte socioculturel du média et des environnements communicatifs que nous créons dans nos maisons. Le prochain article " Les groupes d'attention primaires : une approche conceptuelle sur l'écologie communicative de la communauté individuelle dans l'âge de l'information " par Allison qui applique le modèle de couches décrit ci-dessus pour analyser les groupements sociaux individuels. Peeples et Mitchell ont aussi trouvé le modèle de niveaux pratique en explorant les protestes de l'OMC en 1999 dans " Pas de foule - Pas de confusion - Pas de tumulte : le réseau de la désobéissance civile ". L'article de Powell " Une écologie de l'accès public à Internet : l'exploration contextuelle à l'accès Internet dans une communauté urbaine " conclus cette publication spéciale en offrant des explications du rôle que l'accès publique à Internet donne dans l'écologie communicative des quartiers déshérités.

Nous voulons remercier nos collègues pour leur aide et assistance à nous donner une qualité de critique extraordinaire pour cette édition spéciale de EJC : Corey Anton, Grand Valley State University; Elija Cassidy, Queensland University of Technology; Christy Collis, Queensland University of Technology; Victor Gonzalez, University of Manchester; Phil Graham, Queensland University of Technology; Joshua Green, Massachusetts Institute of Technology; Deborah Jones, Victoria University of Wellington; Jesper Kjeldskov, Aalborg University; Mark Latonero, California State University, Fullerton; Graham Longford, University of Toronto; Harvey May, Queensland University of Technology; Lucy Montgomery, University of Westminster; Tanya Notley, Queensland University of Technology; Christine Satchell, University of Melbourne; Larry Stillman, Monash University; Jo Tacchi, Queensland University of Technology; Wallace Taylor, Cape Peninsula University of Technology; Tommaso Venturini, University of Milano - Bicocca. Notre travail est cautionné par le Australian Research Council's Discovery (numéro du projet : DP0663854) et par Dr. Marcus Foth qui est bénéficiaire d'un ARC Australien pour un poste de recherche.

Foth, M., & Hearn, G. (2007, forthcoming). Networked individualism of urban residents: Discovering the communicative ecology in inner-city apartment complexes. Information, Communication & Society, 10(5).

Tacchi, J., Slater, D., & Hearn, G. (2003). Ethnographic action research handbook. New Delhi, India: UNESCO.


Comparing the Communicative Ecologies of Geo-Ethnic Communities:
How People Stay On Top Of Their Community

Holley A. Wilkin
Georgia State University

Sandra J. Ball-Rokeach
University of Southern California

Matthew D. Matsaganis
University of Southern California

Pauline Hope Cheong
State University of New York, Buffalo

Abstract. Relying on the theoretical frameworks of media system dependency (MSD) and communication infrastructure theory (CIT), both distinctively ecological approaches, this paper has methodological and applied goals. The first is to highlight and persuade researchers and practitioners of the advantages of studying communication ecologies - the web of interpersonal and media (new and old/mainstream and geo-ethnic) connections that people construct in the course of everyday life. The second aim is to present a comprehensive multiethnic communication map to guide the efforts of all who seek the most effective ways to communicate with ethnically diverse populations. In this paper we provide a comprehensive look at the communication connection patterns of African Americans, Anglos, Armenians, Chinese, Hispanics, and Koreans living in several different Los Angeles communities.

 

Comparer les écologies de communication des communautés ethniques et géographiques: comment les gens restent au courant dans leurs communautés. En se fiant aux cadres théoriques de la dépendance aux médias et de la théorie des infrastructures communicatives, deux approches écologiques distincts, cet article a des objectifs méthodologiques et appliqués. Le premier est de souligner et de persuader les chercheurs et les praticiens des avantages d'étudier les écologies de la communication-la toile des connections interpersonnels et médiatiques (neuf et vieux/grand public et ethnicité géographique) que les gens construisent dans leur vie de tous les jours. Le deuxième objectif est de présenter une carte communicative multiethnique pour guider les efforts de ceux qui cherche le meilleur moyen de communiquer avec des populations ethniques diverses. Dans cet article, nous offrons un regard détaillé sur les habitudes des connections communicatives des noirs américains, des anglais, des arméniens, des chinois, des hispaniques, et des coréens vivant dans différentes communautés à Los Angeles.


The Material Ecologies of Domestic ICTs

Chris Shepherd
Michael Arnold
Craig Bellamy
Martin Gibbs
University of Melbourne

Abstract. This article uses and extends Altheide´s notion of communicative ecology to explore how the spatial logics of ICTs produce particular sociotechnical performances in domestic places. Drawing on data from our ¨Connected Homes Project¨, we discuss what people and ICTs do to the materiality of space, what these arrangements in space do to households of people, and to what space-using people and space-defining technologies do to each other. We present five cases of domestic environments as five spatial logics for making boundaries: surveilling a place, producing a dedicated media space, building a nesting place, and for distributing leisure and work. It is concluded that as social agents we construct and design these environments with particular social performances in mind, understanding that social performance and the material arrangements of technologies in space and time are intertwined.

Les écologies matérielles des ICT domestiques. Cet article utilise et accroit la notion d'écologie communicative de Altheide afin d'explorer comment les logistiques spatiales des ICT produisent certaines performances socio-technologiques dans les endroits domestiques. En prenant des données de notre " Projet du rapprochement des maisons ", nous discutons de ce que les gens et les ICT font de la matérialité de l'espace, ce que ces arrangements dans l'espace font sur les familles, et ce que les gens qui utilisent l'espace et les technologies qui définissent l'espace font à l'un l'autre. Nous présentons cinq cas d'environnements domestiques comme cinq logiques spatiales pour créer une limite : l'enquête d'un endroit, créer un espace média, construire un endroit pour faire son nid, et pour distribuer les loisirs et le travail. Il a été conclus qu'en temps qu'agents sociaux, nous construisons et concevons ces environnements avec certaines performances sociales en tête, en comprenant que les performances sociales et les arrangements matériels des technologies dans l'espace et le temps sont imbriqués l'un dans l'autre.


Primary Attention Groups:

A Conceptual Approach to the Communicative Ecology of Individual Community in the Information Age


Mary Ann Allison
Hofstra University

Abstract: The Information Revolution has triggered substantive changes in society, including the nature of community. Using the three layer model of communicative ecologies designed by Foth and Hearn, I describe a new form of community -- the primary attention group -- which is centered on an individual and exists in both geographic and virtual space, using both face-to-face and electronically mediated communications. Unlike traditional community where the customs and norms are generally applicable, in an egocentric primary attention group, the individual must negotiate three distinct subsystems of relationships. The paper concludes with a description of a project in which action research is being used to document student primary attention groups with the objective of increasing student ability to facilitate and maintain relationships which support productive and happy lives.

Les groupes d'attention primaires : une approche conceptuelle sur l'écologie communicative de la communauté individuelle dans l'âge de l'information. La révolution de l'information a déclenché des changements substantiels dans la société, comprenant même la nature de la communauté. En utilisant le modèle des trois couches des écologies communicatives conçus par Foth et Hearn, je décris une nouvelle forme de communauté-le groupe d'attention primaire-qui est centré sur un individu et qui existe aussi bien de façon géographique que d'espace virtuel, en utilisant le face à face et les communications par l'intermédiaire de l'électronique. Au contraire de la communauté traditionnelle ou les coutumes et les normes sont généralement applicables dans un groupe primaire d'attention égocentrique, l'individu doit négocier trois sous-systèmes distincts de relations. Cet article conclut avec une description d'un projet dans lequel la recherche par action est utilisée afin de documenter les groupes d'attention primaires avec comme objectif d'augmenter la capacité de l'étudiant à faciliter et à maintenir les relations qui aides les gens à vivre des vies productives et heureuses.


“No Mobs -- No Confusions—No Tumult”: Networking Civil Disobedience

Jennifer A. Peeples
Bentley Mitchell
Utah State University
 

Abstract: Much of the critical analysis of the World Trade Organization 1999 protest has focused on the use of technologies, both in detailing the growth of independent media (Indymedia) as well as the use of the Internet.  The notable praise of technology’s reach, its ability to disseminate information, its equalizing capacity, has eclipsed the more traditional acts of mobilizing and organizing that were also present at the WTO protest.  In this analysis we extend the existing work to analyze how the social layer (how the group organized) and discursive layer (communication themes) functioned within a “networked” organization that was attempting to negotiate the incongruous demands of starting a “movement” while organizing a “campaign.”

"Pas de foule - Pas de confusion - Pas de tumulte" : le réseau de la désobéissance civile. Un nombre important des analyses critiques des protestations de l'Organisation Mondiale du Commerce en 1999 étaient concentrées sur l'utilisation des technologies, dans la façon détaillant l'essor du média indépendant de même que l'utilisation de Internet. L'éloge notable de la portée de la technologie, ça façon de disséminer l'information, ça capacité égalitaire ont effacé les actes plus traditionnels de mobilisation et d'organisation qui était présent à la manifestation de l'OMC. Dans cette analyse, nous étendons le travail existant afin d'analyser comment la couche sociale (comment le groupe s'est organisé) et la couche discursive (les thèmes de communication) fonctionnent à travers un réseau d'organisations qui essayait de négocier les demandes absurdes de commencer un " mouvement " tout en organisant une " campagne ".


An Ecology of Public Internet Access:
Exploring Contextual Internet Access in an Urban Community

Alison Powell
Concordia University

Abstract: This paper explores public internet access in an inner-city community with many “digital divide” characteristics. Using a qualitative methodology attentive to social, technical, and geographic contexts, the paper describes how internet access is integrated into a communicative ecology: specifically, how internet access is identified by residents; what it affords; and its potential for effective use. In addition, it argues that the concept of “universal access” to internet infrastructures must be refined to consider “contextual access” that is, access provided that takes into account cultural, geographic, and demographic factors. Finally, at the level of practice, the paper recommends striking a balance between “universal” and “contextual” internet access in an urban area so that internet access becomes linked with other cultural services, and is integrated into local contexts of use.

Une écologie de l'accès public à Internet : l'exploration contextuelle à l'accès Internet dans une communauté urbaine. Cet article explore l'accès public à Internet dans une communauté déshérité avec beaucoup des caractéristiques d'une division digitale. En utilisant une méthodologie qualitative attentive au social, à la technique et aux contextes géographiques, cet essai décrit comment l'accès à Internet est intégré dans une écologie communicative. Spécifiquement, comment l'accès à Internet est identifié par les résidants ; ceux qu'ils peuvent se permettre ; et le potentiel pour une bonne utilisation. De plus, cet accès à Internet affirme que le concept d'accès universel aux infrastructures Internet doit être affiné afin de considérer l'accès contextuel, comme par exemple les éléments culturels, géographiques, et démographiques. Finalement, au niveau pratique, cet essai recommande de trouver une balance entre l'accès à Internet " universel " et " contextuel " dans une région urbaine pour que l'accès à Internet devienne lié à d'autres services culturels et soit intégré dans les contextes d'utilisation locaux.


Copyright 2007 Communication Institute for Online Scholarship, Inc.

This file may not be publicly distributed or reproduced without written permission of the Communication Institute for Online Scholarship,

P.O. Box 57, Rotterdam Jct., NY 12150 USA (phone: 518-887-2443).