Communication Institute for Online Scholarship
Communication Institute for Online
Scholarship Continous online service and innovation
since 1986
Site index
 
ComAbstracts Visual Communication Concept Explorer Tables of Contents Electronic Journal of Communication ComVista

EJC Volume 18 Number 1 - News Framing in a New Media Age
EJC logo
The Electronic Journal of Communication / La Revue Electronique de Communication

Volume 18 Number 1, 2008


News Framing in a New Media Age

Le cadrage des informations dans l’ère du nouveau média

Editor's Introduction / Introduction éditoriale

Paul D'Angelo
College of New Jersey

Framed By Blogs: Toward a Theory of Frame Sponsorship and Reinforcement Through the Blogosphere / L’encadrement par les blogs : vers une théorie de sponsorisation du cadrage et de renforcement à travers le monde des blogs

Sonora Jha
Seattle University

Successful Joint Venture or out of Control? Framing Europe on French and Dutch Websites / Une entreprise commune réussi ou non? Cadrer l’Europe sur les sites web français et hollandais

Renée Van Os
Baldwin Van Gorp
Fred Wester
Radboud University Nijmegen
The Netherlands

Framing Immigration Online: Online Position Statements of 2006 Candidates for Congress / Cadrer l’immigration en ligne : les annonces des positions en ligne des candidats pour le Congrès en 2006

Maria A. Kopacz
West Chester University


Editorial

Access to Research / Accès à la recherche

Joseph A. DeVito
Hunter College of the City University of New York


Editor's Introduction

Framing is a burgeoning area of study in the communication discipline. Much research on framing focuses on ways that politicians, issue advocates, and other elite news sources use mainstream journalists to communicate their preferred meanings of issues and events. The word ’use’ is important. Its dual meaning – sources ‘use’ the press to send information and sources manipulate the press (‘use’ it) while sending information – captures the essence of news framing: powerful sources frame issues and events in order to make information interesting and palatable to journalists, whom they often need to communicate their frames to audience members, and journalists cannot not frame issues and events because they need sources’ frames to make news informative to audiences, even as they add their own contextualization to sources’ frames – news values and the like – in order to have some measure of professional autonomy in light of the fact that they know they are being used by sources (Gamson & Modigliani, 1989; Price, Tewksbury, & Powers, 1997).

Audience members are generally seen as having a subservient role in the news framing process, particularly when ‘audience’ is broadly conceived to include individuals, aggregate public opinion, and advocacy groups marginalized for one reason or another by the mainstream press. This is not to diminish the important role that so-called ‘audience frames’ play in enabling individuals to understand, converse about, and hold attitudes toward, topics and issues (Gamson, 1996; Scheufele, 1999). Nor is it to diminish the ability of advocacy groups to mobilize existing members, and to reach potentially new members, with internally generated frames communicated through channels other than the mainstream news media (Snow, Rochford, Worden, & Benford, 1986) or with frames intended to be communicated via the mainstream news media (Molotch, 1977). However, of enduring interest to mass communication and political communication researchers are the frames sponsored by elite sources that reach the public via news stories. Research shows that these frames affect the thoughts and opinions of individuals, drive public opinion, and shape discourses (both internal and external) of advocacy groups.

The hypermedia, interactive, and/or networking aspects of the World Wide Web appear to offer alternative research agendas into news framing, particularly with regard to frame-building (cf. Scheufele, 1999), the sub-process, just described, in which journalists and sources infuse frames into story-level narratives. This issue of the Electronic Journal of Communication features three articles that explore frame-building within the intersection of old and new media. As a central theme, these articles aim to provide theoretical and empirical perspectives on frame-building in online environments in order to enlarge our understanding of framing-building offline, in the printed and broadcast news stories of the mainstream news media. And while their focus is on frame-building, each article suggests fresh research agendas on framing effects made possible by an enhanced understanding of online-offline news framing.

Jha offers an interesting theoretical perspective on online-offline frame-building, focusing in particular on weblogs, or ‘blogs.’  She notes that academic researchers have traditionally viewed political and economic elites, and to some extent, advocacy groups and other organized groups, as being the ‘sponsors’ favored by mainstream journalists. This, of course, echoes Tuchman’s (1978) famous formulation: her notion of the ‘news net’ has long provided researchers with a satisfactory mechanism of frame-building – one in which journalists are mainly attuned to the behaviors and actions of elites because those sources lend the weight of structural roles and confer the status of political authority to journalists’ mediating role between sources and audience members. Jha’s thesis is that blogging, and the online communities that bloggers fashion, forces a new conceptualization of frame-building – one in which journalists, attuned to framing that occurs within wide swaths of the blogosphere, are increasingly paying heed to once excluded frame sponsors. She argues that online environments, particularly blogs, are slowly democratizing the arena of frame sponsorship, and that news framing scholars ought to empirically examine these changing framing environments.

Van Os, Van Gorp, and Wester examine frame-building in the context of the 2005 referendum on the European constitution held in France and the Netherlands. In their work, the notion of the ‘public sphere’ is conceptualized to include the online offerings on the referendum of French and Dutch political parties and various non-government organizations (NGOs), in addition to the more traditional notion that news coverage of this, or any other, political issue constitutes the public sphere. Building from established work on the nature of news framing – namely, Gamson and Modigliani’s (1989) framing devices and reasoning devices – they present an interesting set of frames that entail a hybrid of generic frames and issue-specific frames. Van Os et al. find that these frames – ‘donor,’ ‘invention’ and ‘David vs. Goliath’ are differentially expressed in press coverage and online offerings. They conclude that within online environments, political parties and NGOs provide audiences with extended treatments – that is, frames – about the European referendum. Additionally, these frames provide thematic perspectives about how to understand ‘Europe.’ In their view, online extensions to the mass media public sphere potentially help citizens to become better informed about European political affairs.

Although her research is situated in a very different topic area, Kopacz nonetheless focuses on an aspect of online framing that is inferred by Van Os and her colleagues. Namely, in examining position statements on immigration on the websites of 2006 U.S. Congressional candidates, Kopacz explores ways that actors normally considered to be elites break the hold of offline gate-keeping by the news media to present their views – and frames – within relatively controlled online environments. Along these lines, framing researchers have long been interested in ways that frames cultivated by individuals and interest groups within traditionally controlled environments (e.g., press releases) are communicated to, and subsequently by, the mainstream news media (e.g., Andsager, 2000). Nowadays, political campaigns are a laboratory for testing how frame-building occurs within relatively controlled online environments (e.g., Bichard, 2006; Trammel, Williams, Postelnicu, & Landreville, 2006). Kopacz found that candidates not only presented a range of frames – including ‘law enforcement’ and ‘ethics’ about immigration, she also examined why they did so based upon political factors such as party membership and incumbency status. Her concluding point provides a fitting conclusion to this introduction, which is that our understanding of frame-building, and of news framing as a whole, will be enhanced via research that continues to systematically compare online and offline framing. A better understanding of the dynamic communication environments in which news framing now occurs can only help framing scholars to revise and refine received notions of media power in contemporary society.

Andsager, J. (2000). How interest groups attempt to shape public opinion with competing news frames. Journalism & Mass Communication Quarterly, 77(3), 577-592.

Bichard, S. L. (2006). Building blogs: A multi-dimensional analysis of the distribution of frames on the 2004 presidential candidate web sites. Journalism & Mass Communication Quarterly, 83(2), 329-345.

Gamson, W. A. (1996). Media discourse as a framing resource. In A. N. Crigler (Ed.), The psychology of political communication (pp. 111-132). Ann Arbor, MI: University of Michigan Press.

Gamson, W. A., & Modigliani, A. (1989). Media discourse and public opinion on nuclear power: A constructionist approach. American Journal of Sociology, 95(1), 1-37.

Molotch, H. (1977). Media and movements. In M. N. Zald & J. D. McCarthy (Eds.), The dynamics of social movements (pp. 71-93). Cambridge, MA: Winthrop.

Price, V., Tewksbury, D., & Powers, E. (1997). Switching trains of thought: The impact of news frames on readers' cognitive responses. Communication Research, 24(5), 481-506.

Snow, D. A., Rochford, E. B., Jr., Worden, S. K., & Benford, R. D. (1986). Frame alignment processes, micromobilization, and movement participation. American Sociological Review, 51, 464-481.

Scheufele, D. A. (1999). Framing as a theory of media effects. Journal of Communication, 49(1), 103-122

Trammel, K. D., Williams, A. P., Postelnicu, M., & Landreville, K. D. (2006). Evolution of online campaigning: Increasing interactivity in candidate web sites and blogs through text and technical features. Mass Communication & Society, 9(1), 21-44.

Tuchman, G. (1978). Making news: A study in the construction of reality. NY: Free Press.


Introduction éditoriale : Le cadrage des informations dans l’ère du nouveau média

Le cadrage est un nouveau domaine dans l’étude de la communication. Beaucoup de recherche sur le cadrage se porte sur la façon dont les hommes politiques, les défenseurs de problèmes, et d’autres importants parties prenants utilisent les journalistes pour communiquer leurs sens des problèmes et des évènements. Le mot « utiliser » est important. Son double sens – les sources « utilisent » la presse pour envoyer des informations et les sources manipulent la presse (l’utilise) tout en envoyant l’information – saisis l’essence du cadrage des informations : des sources puissantes cadrent des problèmes et des évènements afin de rendre l’information intéressante et acceptable aux journalistes qui ont besoin de communiquer leurs cadrages aux membres de l’audience. De ce fait, les journalistes ne peuvent pas ne pas cadrer les problèmes et les évènements parce que eux mêmes ont besoin du cadrage des sources pour rendre l’information instructive aux membres de l’audience, même s’ils rajoutent leurs propre contextes aux cadrages des sources pour la valeur des nouvelles afin d’avoir quelques mesures d’autonomies professionnelles du point de vue que les journalistes savent qu’ils sont utilisés par leurs sources (Gamson & Modigliani, 1989; Price, Tewksbury, & Powers, 1997).

Les membres de l’audience sont généralement vus comme ayant un rôle inférieur dans le processus du cadrage des nouvelles, particulièrement quand « l’audience » est largement conçue d’inclure des individus, une totalité d’opinion publique, et certains groupes de soutien qui sont marginaliser pour une raison ou une autre par la presse. Cela n’est pas pour autant diminuer le rôle important que les « cadrages de l’audience » jouent afin de permettre aux individus de comprendre, de discuter, et d’avoir un certain comportement envers des sujets et des problèmes (Gamson, 1996; Scheufele, 1999). Ce n’est pas non plus de diminuer la capacité des groupes de soutien à  mobiliser les membres existants et d’atteindre potentiellement de nouveaux membres, avec les cadrages générer intérieurement pour communiquer à  travers les réseaux autres que les médias des informations traditionnelles (Snow, Rochford, Worden, & Benford, 1986) ou bien avec des cadrages ayant pour but d’être communiquer à  travers les médias d’informations (Molotch, 1977). Cependant, d’un intérêt continu pour la masse de communication et pour les enquêteurs de communications politiques sont les cadrages sponsorisés par les sources élites qui atteignent le public à  travers les informations. La recherche démontre que ces cadrages touchent les pensées et les opinions des individus, conduit l’opinion publique, et donne forme aux discours (aussi bien interne qu’externe) des groupes partisans.

L’hypermédia, l’interactif, et/ou les aspects des réseaux du Web ont l’air d’offrir des programmes de recherche alternatifs dans le cadrage des informations, en particulier en ce qui concerne la construction du cadrage (cf. Scheufele, 1999). Ce processus décrit dans lequel les journalistes et leurs sources infusent les cadrages au niveau même des narratives des histoires. Cette édition du Journal électronique de communication se distingue par trois articles qui explorent la construction du cadrage à l’intersection des anciens et des nouveaux médias. A partir d’un thème central, ces articles ont pour but de donner des perspectives théoriques et concrètes sur la construction des cadrages dans des environnements en ligne afin d’améliorer notre compréhension des constructions de cadrage hors ligne dans les informations imprimées et diffusées dans les médias. Bien que leurs objectifs soient la construction des cadrages, chaque article suggère de nouveaux programmes de recherches sur les effets du cadrage rendu possible par une meilleure compréhension du cadrage des informations en ligne et hors ligne.

Jha offre une perspective théorique intéressante du cadrage des informations en ligne et hors ligne en se concentrant en particulier sur les blogs. Elle note que les chercheurs académiques ont traditionnellement vu les élites politiques et économiques, et jusqu'à  un certain point, les groupes de soutien et d’autres groupes organisé, comme étant les « sponsors » favorisé des journalistes. Cela, bien sûr, résonne avec la formulation fameuse de Tuchman (1978) : sa notion du « filet d’information » qui a offert depuis bien longtemps aux chercheurs un mécanisme satisfaisant du cadrage, un dans lequel les journalistes sont principalement sensibles aux manières et aux actions des élites parce que ces sources contribuent aux rôles structuraux et confèrent le statut de l’autorité politique aux rôles médiateurs des journalistes entre les sources et les membres de l’audience. La thèse de Jha est que les blogs, et cette communauté en ligne qu’elle crée, oblige une nouvelle conceptualisation du cadrage – un dans lequel les journalistes, sensible aux cadrages qui existent dans nombres de blogs, payent de plus en plus attention aux cadrages des sponsors auparavant exclus. Elle affirme que les environnements en ligne et en particulier les blogs, démocratisent lentement la sponsorisation des cadrages et que les spécialistes des cadrages d’informations devraient payer attention à  ce développement dans leurs études concrètes.

Van Os, Van Gorp, et Wester examinent le cadrage dans le contexte du référendum de la constitution européenne qui a eu lieu en France et aux Pays Bas en 2005. Dans leurs travaux, la notion de la « sphère publique » est conceptualisée pour inclure des offres en ligne sur le référendum des parties politiques français et hollandais ainsi que d’autres organisations non-gouvernementales, en plus des notions plus traditionnelles du reportage des informations politiques qui constituent la sphère publique. Développer du travail déjà  accompli sur la nature du cadrage des informations – en particulier les systèmes de cadrage et de raisonnement de Gamson et Modigliani (1989) – qui présentent une série intéressante de cadrage comportant un hybride de cadrage générique ainsi que des cadrages à  problèmes spécifiques. Van Os et compagnie trouvent ces cadrages – « donneur », « invention » et « David contre Goliath » – sont exprimés différemment dans la presse et en ligne. Ils concluent qu’à  l’intérieur des environnements en ligne, les parties politiques et les autres organisations non-gouvernementales offrent des cadrages extensifs sur le référendum européen. De plus, ces cadrages offrent des perspectives de thèmes sur la façon de mieux comprendre l’Europe. De leur point de vue, les extensions en ligne des médias de la sphère publique peut aider les citoyens à  être mieux informer sur les affaires publiques européennes.

Bien que sa recherche se trouve dans un domaine différent, Kopacz néanmoins cible un aspect du cadrage en ligne qui est inféré par Van Os et ses collègues. C'est-à-dire, en examinant les positions des déclarations sur l’immigration sur les sites web des candidats au Congrès en 2006, Kopacz explore les façons dont les acteurs normalement considérés comme étant l’élite arrivent à casser l’emprise des médias et de présenter leurs vues – et leurs cadrages – à travers un environnement en ligne relativement contrôlé. Sur ces lignes, les chercheurs de cadrages sont depuis bien longtemps intéressés dans les façons dont les cadrages cultiver par les gens et par les groupes d’intérêts à travers des traditions d’environnements contrôlées comme par exemple les communiqués de presse qui sont transmis a, et ensuite par, les médias de l’information (Andsager, 2000). De nos jours, les campagnes politiques sont un laboratoire pour tester comment le cadrage se produit dans des environnements en ligne relativement contrôlés (Bichard, 2006; Trammel, Williams, Postelnicu, & Landreville, 2006). Kopacz a trouvé que les candidats ont non-seulement présentés une gamme de cadrages comprenant « le maintien de l’ordre » et « les règles déontologiques » sur l’immigration, elle a aussi examiné pourquoi ces candidats se sont basés sur des facteurs politiques tels que les membres de certains partis politiques. Son but offre une conclusion adéquate à  cette introduction qui est que notre compréhension du cadrage de cette construction, et du cadrage en entier, sera amélioré grà¢ce à  la recherche qui continue systématiquement à  comparer le cadrage en ligne et hors ligne. Une meilleure compréhension des environnements communicatifs dynamique dans lesquels « le cadrage des informations » se produit maintenant et ne peut qu’aider les spécialistes du cadrage a réviser et a améliorer les notions acceptées de la puissance des médias dans notre société contemporaine.

Andsager, J. (2000). How interest groups attempt to shape public opinion with competing news frames. Journalism & Mass Communication Quarterly, 77(3), 577-592.

Bichard, S. L. (2006). Building blogs: A multi-dimensional analysis of the distribution of frames on the 2004 presidential candidate web sites. Journalism & Mass Communication Quarterly, 83(2), 329-345.

Gamson, W. A. (1996). Media discourse as a framing resource. In A. N. Crigler (Ed.), The psychology of political communication (pp. 111-132). Ann Arbor, MI: University of Michigan Press.

Gamson, W. A., & Modigliani, A. (1989). Media discourse and public opinion on nuclear power: A constructionist approach. American Journal of Sociology, 95(1), 1-37.

Molotch, H. (1977). Media and movements. In M. N. Zald & J. D. McCarthy (Eds.), The dynamics of social movements (pp. 71-93). Cambridge, MA: Winthrop.

Price, V., Tewksbury, D., & Powers, E. (1997). Switching trains of thought: The impact of news frames on readers' cognitive responses. Communication Research, 24(5), 481-506.

Snow, D. A., Rochford, E. B., Jr., Worden, S. K., & Benford, R. D. (1986). Frame alignment processes, micromobilization, and movement participation. American Sociological Review, 51, 464-481.

Scheufele, D. A. (1999). Framing as a theory of media effects. Journal of Communication, 49(1), 103-122

Trammel, K. D., Williams, A. P., Postelnicu, M., & Landreville, K. D. (2006). Evolution of online campaigning: Increasing interactivity in candidate web sites and blogs through text and technical features. Mass Communication & Society, 9(1), 21-44.

Tuchman, G. (1978). Making news: A study in the construction of reality. NY: Free Press.


Framed By Blogs: Toward a Theory of Frame Sponsorship and Reinforcement Through the Blogosphere

Abstract: The emergence of an overwhelming blogosphere in recent years calls for the development of framing theory along new tracks. This paper suggests avenues for such theory building and areas for empirical research, particularly in the less explored domain of the impact of blogs and blog readers/comment threads as frame sponsors. Further, given the complex, nebulous relationships between traditional media and new media (blogs), this paper focuses on the framing and re-framing dynamics between these key frame-setters. Reaching back into the work of some significant framing theorists, this paper suggests new pathways to study framing by blogs as narrative texts, schematized indicators and, indeed, a reinforcement of the frames of traditional media.

L’encadrement par les blogs : vers une théorie de sponsorisation du cadrage et de renforcement à  travers le monde des blogs : L ’importance qu’a prit le monde des blogs ces dernières années appelle à  ce que la théorie du cadrage se développe sur de nouvelles voies.  Cette étude offre des voies pour de telles constructions théoriques et pour les domaines de recherches empiriques, en particulier dans les domaines moins exploré sur l’impact des blogs. De plus, prenant en compte les relations complexes et nébuleuses entre les médias traditionnels et ce nouveau média que sont les blogs, cette étude examine le cadrage et le recadrage dynamique de ces deux genres. En étudiant les travaux d’importants théoriciens du cadrage, cette étude suggère de nouveaux chemins pour étudier le cadrage par les blogs comme textes narratifs, comme indicateurs schématisés, et en fait un renforcement des cadrages des médias traditionnels.


Successful Joint Venture or out of Control? Framing Europe on French and Dutch Websites

Abstract: This paper focuses on online political communication about Europe produced by French and Dutch political parties and NGOs in the context of the 2005 referendum on the European constitution, and compares this Internet-based communication with news in French and Dutch newspapers in the context of the same event. The aim of this study is to disclose the (sometimes hidden) frames within these various types of political communication, and determine whether these frames, conceptualized as common understandings of what constitutes “Europe,” are cross-nationally shared among political actors. In the inductive phase of the study, three frames have been reconstructed. In each frame Europe is portrayed in a different manner: (1) in the Donor Frame, Europe is portrayed as a successful joint venture; (2) in the David vs. Goliath Frame, as an oppressive superstate; and (3) in the Invention Frame, as out of control. In the deductive phase of the study, the three reconstructed frames were subsequently examined for their presence in a larger set of texts (n = 268). The most commonly shared understanding appeared to be the Donor Frame, which was employed by 81% of the political actors in the two countries.

Une entreprise commune réussi ou non? Cadrer l’Europe sur les sites web français et hollandais : Cette étude examine la communication politique en ligne sur l’Europe faite par les parties politiques français et hollandais ainsi que par d’autres organisations non-gouvernementales dans le contexte du référendum de 2005 sur la constitution européenne. Cette étude compare la communication basée sur Internet avec les informations des journaux français et hollandais dans le contexte du même événement. Le but de cette étude est de démontrer les cadrages (quelque fois cachées) qui existent à  travers ces types différents de communication politique et de déterminer si ces cadres, conceptualiser comme compréhension unie de ce que constitue l’Europe, sont partager par différents groupes quelques soient leur pays d’origine.  Dans la phase inductive de cette étude, trois cadres ont été reconstruits.  Dans chaque cadre, l’Europe est représenter différemment : (1) dans le cadre du « donneur », l’Europe est représenter comme étant une entreprise commune réussi ; (2) dans le cadre de « David contre Goliath », l’Europe est décrit comme un état oppressif ; (3) et dans le cadre de « l’invention », l’Europe est incontrôlable.  Dans la phase déductive de cette étude, les trois cadres reconstruits ont été examinés pour observer leurs présences dans des textes importants (n = 268).  Le plus commun des compréhensions a l’air d’être le cadre « donneur » qui était employé par 81% des gens dans les deux pays.


Framing Immigration Online: Online Position Statements of 2006 Candidates for Congress

Abstract: The rise of the Internet as a campaign medium has created a new venue where political candidates can disseminate their frames of political issues. This study seeks to expand our understanding of online framing by examining the content of 2006 Congressional candidates’ position statements about the issue of immigration, published on their campaign websites. In particular, a computer-based content analysis assessed the nature of lexical categories employed in framing of the immigration issue and the extent to which political factors like party membership and incumbency status predict the reliance on various categories.

The data analysis revealed varying degrees of reliance on five lexical categories: Law Enforcement, Material Resources, National Security, Ethics, and Latinos. Furthermore, both party membership and incumbency status appear to have influenced the reliance on various frames in immigration policy statements. These findings shed light on the nature of candidates’ online messages as prominent sources of political framing.

Cadrer l’immigration en ligne : les annonces des positions en ligne des candidats pour le Congrès en 2006 : La croissance de Internet comme véhicule pour la campagne électorale a créé une nouvelle voie o๠les candidats politiques peuvent disséminer leurs cadrages sur les problèmes politiques.  Cette étude cherche à  améliorer notre compréhension du cadrage en ligne en examinant la position des candidats pour le Congrès en 2006 sur le problème de l’immigration tels que publier sur les sites web de leurs campagnes électorales.  En particulier, une analyse du contenu basée sur ordinateur a évalué les catégories du lexique employer dans le cadrage des problèmes sur l’immigration et comment les raisons politiques tels qu’être membres d’un parti politique ou être tenant de la position prédit une dépendance vis-à-vis de certaines catégories.  L’analyse de l’information a révélé cinq catégories lexiques : les agents du maintien de l’ordre, les ressources matériels, la sécurité nationale, l’éthique, et les latinos.  De plus, les membres des parties politiques ainsi que les politiciens sortants ont l’air d’avoir une influence sur les cadrages variés des déclarations sur la politique de l’immigration.  Ces découvertes illustrent les messages en ligne des candidats comme sources importantes de cadrage politique.


A Woman’s (and Man’s?) Right to Choose: Journalists’ Language Choices in News about Abortion

Abstract: This mixed-methodology study examined a six-year national sample of newspaper coverage about abortion, finding that female reporters wrote about the issue in slightly greater numbers than their share in the newsroom, nationally. Male sources, however, continued to dominate the news about abortion, appearing more than two and a half times as often as female sources. They also appeared as the first source in articles about abortion more than 70% of the time. Female and male journalists were equally as likely to include male sources. The terms “anti-abortion” and “abortion rights” most frequently described the two “sides” in the abortion debate, both overall, and in articles written by each gender. Yet, when five terms that most often describe or are used by anti-abortion adherents were combined, they were significantly more likely to appear in female-authored articles. A textual analysis found eight commonly-used themes or patterns in news articles about abortion. Female reporters more often used themes related to women-focused concerns such as women’s health and safety, family planning, and the strength of conviction of anti-abortion adherents. Female reporters also much more often included language to portray abortion opponents as foolish or extremists. Male reporters covering abortion more often called attention to powerful institutions such as the military, the (Christian) church, and the law.

Le droit de choisir d’une femme (et d’un homme ?) : les choix du langage des journalistes dans les nouvelles sur l’avortement : Cette étude à  méthodes mixtes a examiné sur le plan national d’une période de six ans un échantillon de la couverture dans les journaux sur l’avortement a rapporté que les femmes reporters écrivaient un peu plus sur ce sujet que leurs parts dans les bureaux de rédaction.  Malgré cela, les hommes continuent de dominer les informations sur l’avortement en apparaissant plus de deux fois et demie souvent que les femmes.  Les sources émanant des hommes apparaissaient comme la première source de ces articles sur l’avortement a plus de 70% des fois.  La probabilité était la même que les journalistes hommes et femmes utilisaient des sources masculines.  Les termes « contre l’avortement » et « les droits pour l’avortement » décrivaient plus souvent les deux cotés du débat sur l’avortement dans les articles écrient par les hommes et les femmes. Cependant, quand cinq termes qui sont les plus souvent décris ou utilisés par les gens contre l’avortement, ils étaient bien plus probable d’apparaître dans des articles écrient par des femmes.  Une analyse de texte a trouvé huit thèmes souvent utilisés dans les articles sur l’avortement. Les journalistes femmes utilisent plus souvent des thèmes en relation avec des intérêts centrés sur les femmes tels que la santé et la sécurité, le planning familial, et la force de conviction des adhérents contre l’avortement.  Les femmes journalistes incluent bien plus souvent un langage qui décrit les personnes contre l’avortement comme étant bêtes ou extrémistes.  Les hommes journalistes qui couvrent l’avortement paient beaucoup plus d’attention aux institutions puissantes que sont l’armée, l’église (chrétienne), et la loi.


Modeling Managers' Intentions to Adopt Telecommuting in a Developing Country: A Case from Egypt

Abstract. Thousands of companies today appreciate the competitive advantage of telecommuting as an accepted work arrangement in the United States and some other European countries. The main purpose of this article is to explore the possibility of applying telecommuting in Egypt by looking at the factors that affect Egyptian managers' intentions to allow their subordinates to work from home. Understanding the nature of these factors may assist Egyptian organizations to promote telecommuting as an alternative to working in the office or at the job site. Original data were collected by using a self-administered questionnaire. A sample of 240 Egyptian information managers in Dakahlia Governorate completed the questionnaires with usable data. The results revealed that managers' attitudes toward telecommuting, pressure to use telecommuting, perceived usefulness of telecommuting and the availability of the required technology are important factors in predicting managers' intentions to adopt telecommuting. The results also revealed that although the pressures to adopt telecommuting are high, the weak ICT infrastructure and the shortages of IT experts are possible reasons for the current lack of telecommuting diffusion in Egyptian organizations.

Modeler les intentions des directeurs a adopté le télétravail dans les pays en voie de développement : un cas égyptien : Des milliers de compagnies aujourd’hui apprécient l’avantage compétitif qu’offre le télétravail comme un arrangement accepté aux Etats-Unis et dans certains pays européens. Le but principal de cet article est d’exploré la possibilité de mettre en route le télétravail en Egypte en examinant les facteurs qui touchent les directeurs égyptiens dans leurs désirs de laisser leurs subordonnées à travailler de chez eux. Comprendre ces facteurs peut aider les compagnies égyptiennes à promouvoir le télétravail comme alternative pour les employés. Des informations nouvelles ont été collectées en utilisant un questionnaire envoyé à 240 directeurs égyptiens du gouvernement de Dakahlia. Les questionnaires ont été remplis avec des informations utilisables. Les résultats ont révélés les attitudes des directeurs envers le télétravail, la pression d’utiliser le télétravail, les avantages du télétravail et la disponibilité de la technologie requise sont d’importants facteurs pour prédire les intentions des directeurs à  adopter le télétravail. Les résultats ont aussi révélés que, bien que les pressions d’utiliser le télétravail soient importantes, l’infrastructure faible des technologies de l’information et de la communication ainsi que le manque d’experts en technologie sont des raisons possibles pour le manque de télétravail dans les compagnies égyptiennes.


Access to Research

Abstract: That many academic associations, (including NCA, the National Communication Association) are partnering with publishing houses to print and market scholarly journals has advantages, including consistent editing, article digitization and adding meta-tags, and registering the digital object identification. However, there are potential downsides to exclusive partnering arrangements: for the field of study, for authors, for students and researchers, and for ready availability of information in the article. The author suggests that with online journal subscriptions becoming more prevalent (compared with print subscriptions), there may be profitable alternative ways to make research available.

Accès à la recherche : Le fait que nombres d’associations académiques (tel que l’Association de Communication Nationale) rentrent en partenariat avec des maisons d’éditions et lance des revues ont des avantages tels que des rédactions constantes, une digitalisation constante, l’utilisation de marqueurs et l’enregistrement digital d’objets identifiables.  Cependant, des risques existent à  avoir des partenariats exclusifs pour le champ d’étude, pour les auteurs, pour les étudiants et les chercheurs, et pour la facilité à  avoir accès à  l’information pour l’article.  L’auteur suggère qu’avec les abonnements des journaux en ligne devenant plus commun (en comparaison avec les abonnements des revues), il existe peut être des façons alternatives de rendre la recherche disponible.


Acknowledgements

Paul D'Angelo, editor of this issue's collection of articles on news framing, would like to acknowledge and thank the following reviewers for their work on this project:

  • Sean Aday
    George Washington University
  • Julie Andsager
    University of Iowa
  • Philemon Bantimaroudis
    University of the Aegean
  • Shannon L. Bichard
    Texas Tech University
  • Joel David Bloom
    State University of New York-Albany
  • Michael P. Boyle
    West Chester University
  • Dominique Brossard
    University of Wisconsin-Madison
  • Sam Cherribi
    Emory University
  • Jaeho Cho
    University of California-Davis
  • Cynthia-Lou Coleman
    Portland State University
  • Renita Coleman
    University of Texas at Austin
  • Stephen D. Cooper
    Marshall University
  • Daniela V. Dimitrova
    Iowa State University
  • David Domingo
    University of Iowa
  • Jan Fernback
    Temple University
  • Eliza T. Hawkins
    Brigham Young University
  • Michel M. Haigh
    Pennsylvania State University
  • Julie Jones
    University of Minnesota
  • Selcan Keynak
    Bogazici University, Turkey
  • Jim A. Kuypers
    Virginia Tech
  • Katherine A. McComas
    Cornell University
  • John C. Pollock
    The College of New Jersey
  • Monica Postelnicu
    Louisiana State University
  • Scott Reinardy
    Ball State University
  • Louis Rutigliano
    University of Texas at Austin
  • Adam J. Schiffer
    Texas Christian University
  • Kaye D. Sweetser
    University of Georgia
  • Claes H. de Vreese
    University of Amsterdam
  • Robert H. Wicks
    University of Arkansas
  • Andrew Paul Williams
    Virginia Tech
  • Magdalena Wojcieszak
    University of Pennsylvania