Communication Institute for Online Scholarship
Communication Institute for Online Scholarship Continous online service and innovation since 1986
Site index
 
ComAbstractsVisual Communication Concept ExplorerAbout the CIOSElectronic Journal of CommunicationComVista
EJC logo
Electronic Journal of Communication


Volume 19 Numbers 3 & 4, 2009

Irony and Politics / Ironie et politique

Editors / Éditeurs :

Megan Boler
University of Toronto

Ted Gournelos
Maryville University

Editor's Introduction / Introduction éditoriale

Megan Boler
University of Toronto

Ted Gournelos
Maryville University

Tyranny of the Dichotomy: Prophetic Dualism, Irony, and The Onion / La tyrannie de la dichotomie : le dualisme prophétique, la satire et The Onion

Jamie Warner
Marshall University, West Virginia

Irony and Silence/Ironies of Silence: On the Politics of Not Laughing / Ironie et silence/les ironies du silence : sur la politique de ne pas rire

Nathan Wilson
Northwest Missouri State University

Irony, Community, and the Intelligent Design Debate in South Park and The Simpsons / L’ironie, la communauté, et le débat sur l’étude de l’intelligence dans South Park et dans Les Simpson

Ted Gournelos
Maryville University

Thinking with Foucault about Truth-Telling and The Daily Show / Réfléchir avec Foucault sur la vérité et The Daily Show

Matthew Jordan
Pennsylvania State University

Calling on the Colbert Nation: Fandom, Politics and Parody in an Age of Media Convergence / Appelons le monde de Colbert : les fans, la politique et la parodie dans l’âge de la convergence médiatique

Catherine Burwell
Ontario Institute for Studies in Education, University of Toronto

Megan Boler
University of Toronto

Are They For Real? Activism and Ironic Identities / Est-ce vrai? L’activisme et les identités ironiques

Amber Day
Bryant University

Naming and Shaming: News Satire and Symbolic Power / Nommer et donner honte : la satire des nouvelles et le pouvoir symbolique

Graham Meikle
University of Stirling, UK


Special Section: A Transcript of a Public Conversation

Politics in the Age of YouTube / La politique dans l’ère de YouTube

Henry Jenkins
Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Stephen Duncombe
New York University


Special Section: Forum on the Film Borat: Cultural Learnings of America for Make Benefit Glorious Nation of Kazakhstan (2006)

Borat: Cultural Learnings of America for Make Benefit of Glorious Nation of Kazakhstan: The Ecstasy and the Agony / Borat, leçons culturelles sur l’Amérique au profit glorieuse nation Kazakhstan :  l’extase et l’agonie

Christie Davies
Emeritus Professor University of Reading UK

(Mis)reading Borat: The Risks of Irony in the Digital Age / (Mal) lire Borat : les risques de l’ironie dans l’ère numérique

Paul Lewis
Boston College

What is Offensive to Whom in Borat, and What Should Offend Us? / Qu’est-ce qui est offensif et pour qui dans Borat, et qu’est-ce qui devrait nous offenser ?

John Morreall
College of William and Mary

Borat and the Targets of Cinematic Comedy / Borat et les cibles de comédies cinématographiques

Elliott Oring
California State University, Los Angeles

How Borat Lowers the Bar of Political Satire: The Joke is On Us / Comment Borat baisse le niveau de la satire politique : nous sommes tombé dans le piège

Megan Boler
University of Toronto


Editor's Introduction: Irony and Politics

Megan Boler
University of Toronto

and

Ted Gournelos
Maryville University

At the May 2008 International Communication Association Meeting in Montreal, hundreds of media scholars packed into a conference room to hear about “The Future of Media Effects Theory: Setting a Course for the 21 st Century.” The panel of cognitive psychologists and mass communication scholars confessed to a revelation that shocked the unusually large audience: the media effects model, one senior panelist announced, has proved an embarrassment to the profession; it is time that reception and production models recognize the vastly more complex dynamic relationships that constitute media. The final speaker “prepared to flee the room” as he announced: “media effects must be accepted as dead and done.”

This is hardly earth-shattering to most cultural studies scholars, who among others have long questioned the media-effects model. [1] However, we argue that one factor that has contributed to the radical sea change in more traditional communications studies is the rise of politically conscious irony in the contemporary mediascape. Many media producers and consumers (if one even distinguishes the two) have over the last eight years increasingly adopted irony as a language of dissent to contest U.S. corporate media-state propaganda, repression, and omission. Irony has come to function as what Deleuze termed a “minor language,” both derivative of and challenging dominant discourse (or, as Foucault might have it, “speaking truth to power”). We suggest that it is not a coincidence that popularized satire has flourished during the past eight years of corporate media’s all-too-frequent willingness to f unction as a mouthpiece for U.S. government interests. [2] This issue thus offers a unique collection of nuanced political analyses of popular instances of satire, irony, and parody as used to create counterpublics and contest dominant discourses within a hostile media environment. Consciously situated in the midst of pressing contemporary concerns about media and politics, these authors abandon any misguided fixation on static expression and reception. [3]

The public circulation of diverse satiric, parodic, and ironic commentaries--which range from Jon Stewart’s appearance on Crossfire [4] to The Onion to the Yes Men—offer an opportunity to investigate the coincidence of the exponential rise of user-generated content and digital media access and an unparalleled historical failure of corporate media’s espoused public service role. She essays here converge in their analyses of topics: the appeal of (a) irony as a “reality check” that maintains sanity for many in the face of flagrant failures of corporate media, (b) the internet as invaluable “archive” in the absence of a publicly-accessible, complete mainstream news archive, (c) the increased use of the “remix” in popular culture (i.e. using “real” events, news coverage, and sound bytes in repurposed contexts to draw critical attention to political contradiction), and (d) the ongoing corporate battles over production and distribution platforms.

Despite the increased popular circulation of such media, academic studies that are given mainstream airtime often represent overly simplistic media-effects conclusions that satisfy info-byte culture. [5] And one might acknowledge the good reasons behind the desire to point to cause-and-effect in a media-driven culture gone politically haywire: amongst newspapers and scholars, optimists and pessimists, the million-dollar question surfaces in discussion again and again: “there is only one rallying-cry reply to the question, ‘Can satirists affect our perceptions of the candidates?’ Yes, They Can. You bet your keister -- Yes, They Can.” Washington Post, June 12, 2008 [6]).

A close look at the multiple and conflicting messages used by ironic productions, however, demonstrate that it is difficult to convey within a media-effects paradigm the complexity of contemporary audience and prosumer relationships to the “convergence culture” of broadcast, print, and digital media—much less politics. We suggest that the relationship of irony to political action be understood not in terms of cause and effect, but rather as a discursive space that creates possibilities for new political and cultural imaginations of “pre-politicization.” [7]

Each essay in this collection suggests new ways in which media, messages, and audiences can be conceived beyond the limitations of older models. In “Tyranny of the Dichotomy,” Jamie Warner argues that irony, far from being without a “real” message, was used after 9/11 to “introduce ambiguity into the powerful dualism of Good versus Evil, holding up the dualism for ridicule” and broke apart the scripture-esque claims to righteous discourse maintained by the Bush administration. Nathan Wilson similarly argues for the power of irony to challenge established discourse, and suggests that instances like Stephen Colbert’s White House Correspondent’s Dinner speech provoke not only laughter, but also a series of silences that allow (and indeed force) the dominant to briefly work against itself as it opens arenas of discussion outside of accepted norms. Ted Gournelos expands upon this notion, demonstrating through two popular discussions of evolution (versus creationism) the possibilities and limitations of irony as a coherent tool of emancipatory politics. In South Park and The Simpsons, we see how ironic oppositional discourse is grounded by the pattern of engagement itself; it its relationship to a broader social context that determines irony’s political direction.

Matthew Jordan argues that far from being merely a quality of covert humor, irony in fact transcends its limitations as an oppositional strategy. By applying Foucault’s concept of parrhesia (“truth-telling”) to The Daily Show, Jordan explores irony as a paradoxical mode of sincere discourse within an apathetic or cynical public sphere. In their analysis of Colbert Nation fan culture, Catherine Burwell and Megan Boler analyze the complex relationship of audience and fan websites to politics, in which participatory citizenship cannot be easily labeled as self-consciously “political”; like parody, it is a strategy with no guarantees.

The last two essays in this issue extend our understanding of irony. Amber Day analyzes three performance artist groups to argue that some interventions do not merely “preach to the converted,” but in fact “fulfill an integral community-building function,” shifting the terms of debate “by turning laughter over a shared joke into anger and engagement.” Graham Meikle addresses the central question of why media satirists matter, and demonstrates how the interventions of satirists like the UK’s Chris Morris “draw attention to the workings of media power — in particular, they open up an analysis of media in terms of symbolic power.”

Our issue concludes with two special sections: the first, a public conversation between Henry Jenkins and Stephen Duncombe, was held in February 2008 at Otis College of Art and Design. Titled “Politics in the Age of YouTube,” their discussion highlights how popular culture, user-generated content, and diverse forms of humor reflect and influence perceptions of politics and political candidates, and kindly includes questions we developed specifically for this issue. The second section is a forum on the 2006 film Borat, and provides diverse perspectives on the highly popular and problematic “mockumentary.” These short pieces are drawn from a series of papers presented at the 2007 International Society for Humor Studies conference, and a controversial Op-Ed piece by Megan Boler that ran in The Vancouver Sun and in Counterpunch in 2006.

These final sections are meant to provide ideas for future research both within and outside the scope of this special issue, and ultimately ask more questions than they answer. Like irony itself, we hope that this issue is a movement towards conversation, not foreclosure, and we look forward to future developments in what is proving to be a rapidly expanding and fascinating area of communications research.

Notes

[1] For a succinct description of media effects and critiques thereof, see Gauntlett (1998).

[2] See Boler (2008). For discussion of the contemporary politics of digital media, dissent, and journalism, download the Introduction from this link: http://mitpress.mit.edu/catalog/item/default.asp?ttype=2&tid=11464

[3] A recent burgeoning of work addressing parody and satire has begun to address popular cultural tropes that extend outside of the tradition of literary criticism where one finds the predominant academic work on satire, usually outside of political context. These works include Baym, Jones, and Lewis, and Gray; as well. The work of Hutcheon (1989; 1994) offers robust and thorough analyses of parody and irony useful to any student of the subject. See also Colebrook (2004).

[4] See Boler and Turpin, Boler, for an earlier version, see Boler (2006).

[5] Academic studies or polls that can be communicated in short info-bites are not only popular news and TV fodder, but disturbingly these reductive understandings can end up circulating widely without sufficient context. The most troubling of these in recent years was a study widely-cited by popular press which claimed the “Daily Show effect:” that watching The Daily Show will make college-age viewers “more cynical” about U.S. electoral politics and their own voting practices. The sound bite version of the methodologically questionable study was spun (a large lecture-class sample of college students exposed to x minutes of TDS and x minutes of — News, followed by a pencil and paper survey). Here are Baumgertner and Morris’s hypotheses, methods, and conclusions (reflecting not only media-effects model but traditional political science “methods”): “Hy pothesis 1: Young viewers’ evaluations of presidential candidates will become more negative with exposure to campaign coverage on The Daily Show. Hypothesis 2: Young viewers’ evaluations of John Kerry will be more negative than those of George W. Bush with exposure to campaign coverage on The Daily Show.” (2006:346).

Participants were 723 voluntary students “from introductory-level courses in political science at a medium sized public university…. One third watched 8 minute TDS compilation on two major presidential candidates. …The second group watched 8 minutes of similar presidential campaign coverage from CBS Evening News. “CBS Evening News clip provided a baseline for comparison between humorous and traditional television news.” The third (control) group watched neither. All groups filled out a “posttest questionnaire immediately afterward. The experiment did not include a pretest.” (2006 347) (For the full article, see “The Daily Show Effect: Candidate Evaluations, Efficacy, and American Youth,” Jody Baumgartner and Jonathan S. Morris, American Politics Research, Vol. 34, No. 3, 341-367 (2006)). After spending significant time in political science discourses seeking to establish the “generalizability” to some segment of the population an actual “daily show effect” of cynicism in people caused by watching biting satiric political humor, Baumgartner and Morris lob their scientific conclusion: “Our findings suggest that exposure to The Daily Show’s brand of political humor influenced young Americans by lowering support for both presidential candidates and increasing cynicism. The experiment results confirmed a causal connection, and the crosssectional survey data illustrated that the relationship holds up outside the experimental setting. Our analysis of Pew Research Center national survey data further support these findings.”

Pew produced another popularly circulated study soundbite in 2007: “Viewers of Jon Stewart’s The Daily Show and Stephen Colbert’s The Colbert Report rank number 1 amongst the ‘best informed Americans.’ … The six news sources cited most often by people who knew the most about current events were: The Daily Show and The Colbert Report (counted as one), tied with Web sites of major newspapers; next came News Hour With Jim Lehrer; then The O’Reilly Factor, which was tied with National Public Radio; and Rush Limbaugh’s radio program.” (Katharine Q. Seelye, “Best-Informed Also View Fake News, Study Says,” The New York Times, April 16, 2007). This survey does not become reduced to a soundbite of cause and effect, instead recognizing the multiple viewer’s practices that would explain any presumed categorical status such “best-informed”.

A third popularized study in 2007 was “No Joke: A Comparison of Substance in The Daily Show with Jon Stewart and Broadcast Network Television Coverage of the 2004 Presidential Election Campaign,” Julia R. Fox, Glory Koloen, and Volkan Sahin, Journal of Broadcasting & Electronic Media, Volume 51, Issue 2 July 2007, pages 213 – 227.“The study found the networks' coverage to be more hype than substance and coverage on The Daily Show with Jon Stewart to be more humor than substance. The amount of substantive information in The Daily Show with Jon Stewart and the broadcast network newscasts was the same, regardless of whether the unit of analysis was news stories about the presidential election campaign or the entire half-hour program.”

[6] “Comedians Of Clout: In a Funny Way, Satirical Takes Can Color Perceptions of the Presidential Contenders,” by Michael Cavna, June 12, 2008 Washington Post http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2008/06/11/AR2008061103898.html retrieved July 2, 2008.

[7] Here is where the works of Hutcheon (1989; 1994) and Colebrook (2004) and now the contemporary conversations taking place about irony and politics helpfully outline the slippery conditions and risky business of irony.

Works Cited

Boler, M. 2006. “The Daily Show, Crossfire, and the Will to Truth.” Scan Journal of Media Arts Culture. Vol. 3, no. 1 (summer), available at: http://scan.net.au/scan/journal/display.php?journal_id=73, accessed on August 20, 2008.

Boler, Megan, ed. 2008. Digital Media and Democracy: Tactics in Hard Times. Cambridge: MIT. Introduction available at: http://mitpress.mit.edu/catalog/item/default.asp?ttype=2&tid=11464, accessed on August 20, 2008.

Baym, Geoffrey. 2007. “Representation and the Politics of Play: Stephen Colbert’s Better Know a District,” Political Communication, 24:1–18.

Colebrook, Claire. 2004. Irony. New York: Routledge.

Gauntlett, David. 1998. “Ten Things Wrong with the Media Effects Model" http://www.theory.org.uk/david/effects.htm (retrieved July 1, 2008). Originally published as ''Ten things wrong with the ‘effects model’” in Roger Dickinson, Ramaswani Harindranath & Olga Linné, eds (1998), Approaches to Audiences – A Reader. London: Arnold.

Gray, Jonathan. 2006. Watching With The Simpsons. New York: Routledge.

Hutcheon, Linda. 1989. The Politics of Postmodernism. New York: Routledge.

Hutcheon, Linda. 1994. Irony's Edge: The Theory and Politics of Irony. New York: Routledge.

Jones, Jeffrey. 2005. Entertaining Politics: New Political Television and Civic Culture. NY: Rowman and Littlefield Publishers, Inc, 2004.

Lewis, P. 2006. Cracking Up: American Humor in a Time of Conflict. Chicago: University of Chicago Press.


Introduction éditoriale : L’ironie et la politique

Megan Boler
University of Toronto

et

Ted Gournelos
Maryville University

A la réunion en Mai 2008 à Montréal de l’International Communication Association, des centaines de chercheurs sur les médias se sont retrouvés dans une conférence afin d’écouter « le futur de la théorie permettant de comprendre l’impact des médias : fixer un cap pour le 21ème siècle ». Le panneau de psychologistes cognitifs et de chercheurs sur la communication en masse ont confessé une révélation qui a choqué les gens présents : la théorie permettant de comprendre l'impact des médias, a annoncé l’un des invités, a été prouvé comme un embarras pour la profession. Il est temps que les modèles de réception et de production reconnaissent les relations bien plus dynamiques et complexes qui constituent les médias. Le dernier pr ésentateur « était prêt à fuir la pièce » lorsqu’il a annoncé que « l'impact des médias doit être accepté comme étant mort et fini ».

Cela ne choque guère les chercheurs des études culturelles qui, entre autres, ont depuis bien longtemps questionné ce modèle sur l’impact des médias. [1] Cependant, nous faisons l’argument qu’un facteur qui a contribué à ce changement radical des études de communications traditionnelles est l’importance qu’a pris l’ironie dans la conscience politique dans les médias contemporains. Beaucoup de producteurs et de consommateurs de médias (s’il est possible de séparer les deux) ont depuis les huit dernières années de plus en plus adopté l’ironie comme langage de mécontentement afin de contester la propagande, la répression et l’omission voulue par les grandes compagnies américaines. L’ironie fonctionne maintenant comme Deleuze appelle un & laquo; langage mineur » qui est dérivé et qui conteste le discours dominant (ou comme le dit Foucault « parler la vérité au pouvoir »). Nous suggérons que ce n’est pas une coïncidence que la satire populaire a fleuri durant ces huit années où les entreprises médiatiques ont été bien trop souvent des marionnettes pour les intérêts du gouvernement américain. [2] De ce fait, cette publication offre une collection unique d’analyses politiques nuancées des instances populaires de la satire, de l’ironie et de la parodie qui sont utilisées pour créées des discours contraires au travers d’un environnement médiatique hostile. Consciemment situé dans les préoccupations contemporaines des médias et de la politique, ce s auteurs abandonnent toutes leurs fixations erronées sur l’expression et la réception. [3]

La circulation publique de satires diverses, de parodies et de commentaires ironiques qui vont de l’invitation de Jon Stewart sur Crossfire [4] à The Onion et aux Yes Men offre une chance de faire des recherches sur la coïncidence de la montée du contenu généré par les utilisateurs et de l’accès aux médias digitaux ainsi que de l’échec historique des grandes compagnies médiatiques a embrasser le rôle du service public.  Les essais ici présenté convergent dans leurs analyses du sujet : l’attrait de (a) l’ironie comme une réalité qui maintient l’équilibre mental de beaucoup de gens qui font face à ces flagrant échecs des grandes compagnies médiatiques, (b) à Internet comme base d’archives en l&r squo;absence d’archives complètes étant accessible publiquement, (c) l’utilisation croissante des « remix » dans la culture populaire tels que l’utilisation de vrais faits divers, de nouvelles, et de petites phrases reconstruites dans des contextes afin d’attirer l’attention aux contradictions politique, et (d) les batailles des compagnies sur la production et la distribution des plateformes.

Malgré l’augmentation de la circulation populaire de tels médias, les études académiques qui ont données du temps d’antenne sont représentées trop simplement dans les conclusions sur les impacts des médias qui satisfont la culture de l’information par petit morceaux. [5] Quelqu’un peut reconnaitre les bonnes raisons derrière le désire de montrer la cause et l’effet d’une culture poussée par les médias qui est devenu politiquement folle : parmi les journaux et les chercheurs, les optimistes et les pessimistes, la grande question qui s’impose dans la discussion est : ‘Can satirists affect our perceptions of the candidates?’ Yes, They Can. You bet your keister -- Yes, They Can.” Washington Post, June 12, 2008 [6])

En regardant de plus près aux multiples et contradictoires messages utilisés par les productions ironiques démontrent qu’il est difficile de faire comprendre à travers le paradigme de l’impact des médias la complexité des audiences contemporaines et les relations des consommateurs aux cultures convergentes que sont les émissions, l’imprimé, le média informatique ou encore la politique. Nous suggérons que cette relation de l’ironie aux actions politiques soient comprise non pas de façon de cause et d’effet mais plutôt comme un espace discursif qui crée des possibilités pour de nouvelles imaginations politiques et culturelles de « pré-politisation ». [7]

Chaque essai dans cette édition nous apporte de nouvelles façons dont les médias, les messages, et les audiences peuvent être conçu au-delà des limitations des anciens modèles. Dans « la tyrannie de la dichotomie », Jamie Warner argumente que l’ironie, loin d’être sans un vrai message, a été utilisé après le 11 septembre 2001 pour introduire l’ambigüité dans ce dualisme fort qu’est le Bon contre le Mal en prenant le dualisme comme concept ridicule et se sépare du discours vertueux de l’administration du président américain. Nathan Wilson fait un argument pareil sur la puissance de l’ironie à changer le discours établis et suggère des instances telles que le discours de Stephen Colbert au dîner des correspondants à la Maison Blanche qui provoqua non seulement des rires, mais aussi des séries de silences qui ont permis et même forcé les forces dominantes a élargir ses points de discussions en dehors des normes acceptables. Ted Gournelos démontre à travers deux discussions populaires de l’évolution (au contraire du créationnisme) les possibilités et les limitations de l’ironie comme outil cohérent de la politique émancipatoire. Dans South Park et Les Simpson, nous voyons comment le discours oppositionnel ironique est ancré dans le modèle de l’engagement même et dans sa relation à un contexte social bien plus large qui détermine la direction de l’ironie politique.

Matthew Jordan fait l’argument que loin d’être un humour secret, l’ironie en fait dépasse ces limitations comme stratégie oppositionnelle. En utilisant le concept de parrhesia de Foucault au The Daily Show, Jordan explore l’ironie comme un paradoxe sincère de discours entre une sphère publique apathique ou cynique. Dans leur analyse culturelle des fans de Colbert, Catherine Burwell et Megan Boler analysent les relations complexes des sites web des fans et de l’audience à la politique dans lequel les gens qui participent ne peuvent pas être désigné comme étant motivé politiquement. Telle que la parodie, c’est une stratégie sans garantie.

Les deux derniers articles nous font comprendre l’étendu de l’ironie. Amber Day analyse la performance de trois groupes d’artistes afin de réaliser que certaines interventions ne font pas que « prêcher au converti » mais, en fait, tourne le rire d’une blague partagé en colère et en engagement. Graham Meikle adresse la question centrale de pourquoi les satiristes médiatiques sont importants et démontre comment les interventions des satiristes comme l’anglais Chris Morris apporte l’attention sur la façon dont la puissance médiatique marche. En particulier, ils ouvrent une analyse des médias en tant que puissance symbolique.

Notre édition conclus avec deux sections spéciales. La première, une conversation publique entre Henry Jenkins et Stephen Duncombe qui a eu lieu au mois de février 2008 à l’Otis College of Art and Design. Intitulé « la politique dans l’ère de YouTube », leur discussion illumine comment la culture populaire, l’information générer par les utilisateurs, et d’autres formes d’humours reflètent et influencent les perceptions de la politique et des candidats politiques, et gentiment comprend des questions développer spécifiquement pour cette édition. La deuxième section est un forum sur le film de Borat qui offre des perspectives variées de ce film populaire et problématique de la façon dont il se moque des gens. Ces pièces courtes ont été tirées d’une série d e documents présentés à la conférence International de la société des études de l’humour en 2007 et dans un commentaire controversée par Megan Boler qui est apparu dans The Vancouver Sun et dans Counterpunch en 2006.

Ces sections finales sont là pour offrir des idées pour la recherche future à l’intérieur et à l’extérieur du but de cette publication et de ce fait posent beaucoup plus de questions qu’elle n’offre de réponse. Comme l’ironie même, nous espérons que cette publication offre des conversations et nous attendons impatiemment des développements futurs dans un domaine de recherche de communication qui s’élargit et qui fascine. 

Notes

[1] Pour une description succincte sur l’effet des médias et de leurs critiques, regardez : David Gauntlett, “Ten Things Wrong with the Media Effects Model" http://www.theory.org.uk/david/effects.htm (extrait le 2 juillet 2008). Publié à l’origine comme : ''Ten things wrong with the "effects model"' in Roger Dickinson, Ramaswani Harindranath & Olga Linné, eds (1998), Approaches to Audiences – A Reader, published by Arnold, London.

[2] Voir Megan Boler, ed., Digital Media and Democracy: Tactics in Hard Times (Cambridge: MIT, 2008). Pour une discussion sur les politiques contemporaines des médias électroniques, de la dissidence, et du journalisme, télécharger l’introduction de ce lien : http://mitpress.mit.edu/catalog/item/default.asp?ttype=2&tid=11464

[3] De récents travaux sur la parodie et la satire commencent à adresser les tropes culturels populaires qui s’étendent à l’extérieur de la tradition de la critique littéraire où l’on peut trouver la recherche académique sur la satire, généralement en dehors du contexte politique. Ces recherches incluent Jones, Baym, Lewis, et Gray. De même, le travail de Hutcheon (1988 ; 1994) offre des analyses complètes sur la parodie et l’ironie qui peuvent être utile pour les étudiants de ces sujets. Voyez aussi Colebrook (2004).

[4] Regardez Boler et Turpin, Boler, pour une version antérieure, regardez Boler, M., “The Daily Show, Crossfire, and the Will to Truth.” Scan Journal of Media Arts Culture. Vol. 3, no. 1 (summer 2006) http://scan.net.au/

[5] Des études ou des sondages qui peuvent être communiqué en petits morceaux sont non-seulement populaire dans les nouvelles mais peuvent réduire notre compréhension à cause d’un contexte insuffisant. Le plus troublant de ces études ces dernières années était une étude bien utilisé par la presse qui clamait que regarder The Daily Show rendait les étudiants universitaires plus cynique sur le sujet de la politique américaine. La version de cette étude à méthodologie questionnable a été tiré (un grand nombre d’étudiants universitaires ont été exposé à tant de minutes de TDS et à tant de minutes de --- nouvelles et d’informations suivi d’un sondage). Ici, les hypothèses, les méthodes et les conclusions de Baumgertner et de Morris reflètent non-seulement l’impact des médias mais aussi les méthodes des sciences politiques traditionnelles. « L’hypothèse 1 : l’évaluation des jeunes téléspectateurs sur les candidats à la présidentiel deviendra de plus en plus négative avec une exposition sur The Daily Show. L’hypothèse 2 : l’évaluation des jeunes téléspectateurs sur John Kerry sera plus négative que celle de George W. Bush avec une exposition sur The Daily Show ». (2006 :346).

Les participants étaient 723 étudiants volontaires d’études préliminaires en science politique dans une université publique. …Un tiers ont regardé huit minutes de compilation TDS sur deux candidats majeurs de l’élection présidentiel. …Le deuxième groupe a regardé huit minutes d’une couverture similaire de la campagne présidentielle de CBS Evening News. « Le clip de CBS Evening News a offert un niveau de référence afin de comparer entre l’humour et les informations télévisées. »  Le troisième groupe n’a regardé ni l’un ni l’autre. Tous les groupes ont rempli un formulaire juste après l’expérimentation. L’expérimentation n’a pas inclus un examen avant le début de celle-ci. (2006 :347) (Pour voir l’article en entier, regardez « The Daily Show Effect: Candidate Evaluations, Efficacy, and American Youth,” Jody Baumgartner and Jonathan S. Morris, American Politics Research, Vol. 34, No. 3, 341-367 (2006)). Après avoir passé un temps important dans les discours en science politique a cherché d’établir une capacité de généralisation pour certains segments de la population sur l’impact d’un The Daily Show sur le cynisme des gens provoqué en regardant les satires politiques humoristes. Baumgartner et Morris renvoient leur conclusion scientifique : « nos conclusions suggèrent qu’être exposer sur le genre d’humour qu’est The Daily Show influence les jeunes américains a diminué le soutien aux candidats à la présidentiel et a augmenter le cynisme. Les ré ;sultats de cette expérience ont confirmé la cause et les données de l’enquête ont illustré que la relation tiens bien en dehors du cadre expérimental. Notre analyse des données du Pew Research Center confirme nos conclusions.

Pew a produit une autre étude populaire en 2007 : « les téléspectateurs du The Daily Show de Jon Stewart et The Colbert Report de Stephen Colbert étaient premier parmi les meilleurs américains informé. …Les six sources d’information les plus souvent citées par les gens qui connaissent mieux les événements actuels sont : The Daily Show et The Colbert Report (compté comme un) ex-æquo avec les sites web des grands journaux ; ensuite viens News Hour With Jim Lehrer ; puis The O’Reilly Factor qui était au même niveau que National Public Radio ; et enfin l’émission radio de Rush Limbaugh ». (Katharine Q. Seelye, “Best-Informed Also View Fake News, Study Says,” The New York Times, April 16, 2007). Cette enquête n’est pas réduite à une raison de cause et d’impact mais plutôt reconnaît les pratiques de nombreux téléspectateurs qui pourraient expliquer le statut présumé de certaines catégories tel que celle de « mieux informer ».

Une troisième étude populaire en 2007 était « No Joke: A Comparison of Substance in The Daily Show with Jon Stewart and Broadcast Network Television Coverage of the 2004 Presidential Election Campaign,” Julia R. Fox, Glory Koloen, and Volkan Sahin, Journal of Broadcasting & Electronic Media, Volume 51, Issue 2 July 2007, pages 213 – 227. « Cette étude a trouvé que le reportage des réseaux de télévision sont bien plus gonfler et que la couverture sur The Daily Show avec Jon Stewart et les nouvelles des journaux télévisés était la même, quelque soit la façon dont l’analyse des nouvelles était sur la campagne de l’élection présidentielle ou bien sur l’émission entière de cette demi-heure.

[6] “Comedians Of Clout: In a Funny Way, Satirical Takes Can Color Perceptions of the Presidential Contenders,” by Michael Cavna, June 12, 2008 Washington Post http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2008/06/11/AR2008061103898.html extrait le 2 juillet 2008.

[7] Ici est le travail de Hutcheon (1989; 1994) et de Colebrook (2004) et maintenant les conversations contemporaines prennent place sur l’ironie et la politique et offre un plan sur les conditions et les difficultés de travailler avec l’ironie.

Bibliographie : 

Baym, Geoffrey. 2007. “Representation and the Politics of Play: Stephen Colbert’s Better Know a District,” Political Communication, 24:1–18.

Boler, Megan, ed. 2008. Digital Media and Democracy: Tactics in Hard Times. Cambridge: MIT. http://mitpress.mit.edu/catalog/item/default.asp?ttype=2&tid=11464 (download Introduction at MIT link)

Colebrook, Claire. 2004. Irony. New York: Routledge.

Gray, Jonathan. 2006. Watching With The Simpsons. New York: Routledge.

Hutcheon, Linda. 1989. The Politics of Postmodernism. New York: Routledge.

Hutcheon, Linda. 1994. Irony's Edge: The Theory and Politics of Irony. New York: Routledge.

Jones, Jeffrey. 2005. Entertaining Politics: New Political Television and Civic Culture. NY: Rowman and Littlefield Publishers, Inc, 2004.

Lewis, P. 2006. Cracking Up: American Humor in a Time of Conflict. Chicago: University of Chicago Press.

Tyranny of the Dichotomy:
Prophetic Dualism, Irony, and The Onion

Jamie Warner
Marshall University, West Virginia

Abstract: After the terrorist attacks on September 11, 2001, President Bush and his administration immediately framed the attacks as a stark, morally soaked, dichotomized choice between Good and Evil, a type of frame of which Phillip Wander has referred to as “prophetic dualism”: either you are with us or with the terrorists. This rhetorical framing of the attacks not only positioned the Bush Administration and its partisans firmly on the “good” side of the dualism, but also reappropriated any critique of the Administration, or even critique of the dualism itself, as being definitionally on the “evil” side.  In this paper, I argue that the satirical newspaper The Onion used the double edged nature of irony as well as the humor and playfulness of satire to invite readers to critique the Administration and its policies in a way that was not automatically reappropriated and dismissed by the framework of prophetic du alism.  Specifically, The Onion published two types of stories that playfully encouraged readers to see shades of gray in a rigid framework that demanded a black and white understanding of the world.  First, The Onion published articles that called attention to ambiguities in the mutual exclusivity of Good and Evil. Second, The Onion published articles that highlighted ambiguities and incongruities within each supposedly monolithic side of dualism.

La tyrannie de la dichotomie : le dualisme prophétique, la satire et The Onion :  Après les attaques terroristes du 11 septembre 2001, le Président Bush et son administration ont immédiatement encadré les attaques comme un choix dichotomisé entre le Bien et le Mal, un genre de cadrage que Phillip Wander a référé à un « dualisme prophétique » : soit vous êtes avec nous ou alors vous êtes avec les terroristes. Ce cadrage rhétorique des attaques a non seulement positionné l’administration de Bush et de ces partisans sur le « bon » côté de ce dualisme, mais c’est aussi réapproprié toutes les critiques de l’administration, ou bien même les critiques du dualisme, comme étant du côté du « mal ». Dans cet essai, j’argumente que le journal satirique The Onion utilise ce double tranchant que sont l’iro nie et l’humour ainsi que la satire à inviter les lecteurs a critiquer l’administration et sa politique d’une façon qui n’a pas été automatiquement réapproprié et exclus par le cadrage du dualisme prophétique. Spécifiquement, The Onion a publié deux genres d’articles qui ont encouragé les lecteurs à voir différentes teintes de gris dans un cadrage rigide qui demandait une compréhension du monde en noir et blanc. Premièrement, The Onion a publié des articles qui attiraient l’attention sur les ambigüités des exclusivités mutuelles du Bien et du Mal. Deuxièmement, The Onion a publié des articles qui ont démontré des ambigüités et des incongruités à travers chaque côté de ce dualisme monolithique.


Irony and Silence/Ironies of Silence: On the Politics of Not Laughing

Nathan A. Wilson
Tulane University

Abstract: This essay examines Stephen Colbert’s keynote address at the 2006 White House correspondents’ dinner (April 29) and the resulting discussion between mainstream media news and their colleagues on the internet, a situation that has since been labeled “Colbertgate”. Colbert’s humorous address can be classed as irony, parody and possibly satire, but this does not necessarily translate, as Michael Scherer of Salon.com claims, into détournement; Debord and the Situationists have rejected parody as capable of enacting détournement. However, taking a critical rhetoric perspective of political practices, I argue that humorous irony can incite practices of political agency not via the laughter, which is expected, but via the silences it provokes. Three forms of silence thus become prominent: silencing, silent judgment and silent thought. In this last, I find the most potential for a critical rhetoric to act as déto urnement.

Ironie et silence / les ironies du silence : sur la politique de ne pas rire : Cet essai examine la présentation de Stephen Colbert pour le dîner des correspondants ayant eu lieu le 29 avril 2006 à la Maison Blanche et la discussion qui a eu lieu entre les médias de la télévision et des journaux contre leurs collègues de Internet, une situation qui a depuis été baptisé « Colbertgate ». La présentation drôle de Colbert peut être classifié comme ironique, comme parodie ou comme satire, mais cela ne peut pas se traduire nécessairement comme Michael Scherer de Salon.com le dit en détournement. Debord et les Situationnistes ont rejeté les parodies comme étant capable d’inciter le détournement. Cependant, en prenant une perspective rh&ea cute;torique critique des practices politique, je fais l’argument que l’ironie drôle peut inciter des pratiques politiques non pas par le rire, qui est attendu, mais par les silences qu’ils provoquent. Trois formes de silence de ce fait deviennent importantes : le silence, le jugement silencieux et la pensée silencieuse. Dans cette dernière, je trouve le plus grand potentiel pour une rhétorique critique qui fonctionne comme un détournement.


Irony, Community, and the Intelligent Design Debate in South Park and The Simpsons

Ted Gournelos
Maryville University

Abstract: By examining two case studies from shows that are often considered to be similar cultural productions (The Simpsons and South Park), this paper attempts to ground discussions of irony and politics beyond fantasies of static texts. It argues that by looking at how television episodes that at first seem consistently oppositional and stable become less so when seen in contrast with each other and in terms of the same target of critique. In the ongoing struggle over evolution and creationism (or so-called “intelligent design”) in public schools, South Park and The Simpsons found a provocative and dangerous area. They dealt with provocation and danger in significantly different ways, however, that shed light both on the implications of the use of irony in popular culture and on the limitations of stable textual forms for sustained, emancipatory analysis.

L’ironie, la communauté, et le débat sur l’étude de l’intelligence dans South Park et dans Les Simpson :  En examinant les deux études de ces émissions souvent considérées comme étant des productions culturelles équivalentes (Les Simpson et South Park), cet article essaie d’ancrer les discussions politiques et ironiques derrière les fantasmes des textes statiques. L’argument est fait qu’en regardant comment les épisodes de télévision qui au début avait l’air d’être constamment oppositionnel et stable entre l’un l’autre le deviennent moins quand les émissions sont contrastées entre elles et quand elles ont comme cibles les même critiques. Dans cette bataille entre l’évolution et la création (l’étude de l’intelligence) dans les écoles publiques, South Park et Les Simpson ont trouvé un milieu dangereux et provocant. Ces émissions se sont occupées de la provocation et du danger de manières différentes qui ont cependant éclaircit les implications sur l’utilisation de l’ironie dans la culture populaire et sur les limitations de formes textuelles stables pour une analyse émancipatoire soutenu.


Thinking with Foucault about Truth-Telling and The Daily Show

Matthew Jordan
Pennsylvania State University

Réfléchir avec Foucault sur la vérité et The Daily Show : Cet article rassemble deux pratiquants de l’ironie critique que sont Michel Foucault et Jon Stewart afin d’examiner les problèmes de la critique sur l’impact de l’ironie dans le discours culturel. Depuis bien des années, les critiques se sont plains de l’utilisation croissante de l’ironie dans la culture en faisant l’argument que trop d’ironie dans le discours public crée des sujets désengagés et distants. En utilisant l’œuvre de Foucault sur le parrhesia pour réfléchir sur The Daily Show, je fais l’argument que ce dernier n’effrite ni la fondation à travers laquelle la vérité peut être faite ni ne pousse a un cynisme pervers et dangereux parmi son aud ience. Plutôt, cette activité communicative par The Daily Show et par Foucault offrent des modèles éthiques pour des engagements soutenus et continus avec des mensonges et des artifices dans les médias qui sont en relations directs avec le maintien du soi et de la société. De cette façon, les critiques ont besoin de repenser l’importance salutaire de telle ironie vrai dans un monde médiatique dominé par une rhétorique qui parait honnête et un discours sérieux qui est artificiel.


Calling on the Colbert Nation: Fandom, Politics and Parody in an Age of Media Convergence

Catherine Burwell
Ontario Institute for Studies in Education, University of Toronto

and

Megan Boler
University of Toronto

Abstract: In this article we consider the relationship between fandom, politics and parody through an examination of fan practices related to The Colbert Report. We begin by recounting the way in which a project intended to analyze online political activism took an unexpected turn into fan culture. We then undertake two case studies. In the first, we focus on one example of Colbert Report fan participation to demonstrate the ways in which audiences’ online activities complicate theories of irony as simple acts of encoding and decoding. In the second, we revisit two interviews with prominent bloggers writing about The Colbert Report and The Daily Show to suggest that fan practices not only overlap with political practices, but demonstrate a convergence of imaginative performance, cultural consumption and collective engagement that blurs the boundaries between affect and activism. We conclude by suggesting that fan cultures hold significant insights into meaning production and civic engagement in mediated worlds, and that they cannot be separated from questions about contemporary modes of online political expression.

Appelons le monde de Colbert : les fans, la politique et la parodie dans l’âge de la convergence médiatique : dans cet article nous considérons la relation entre les fans, la politique et la parodie à travers un examen des pratiques des fans de l’émission de télévision The Colbert Report. Nous commençons par raconter la façon dont un projet ayant pour but d’analyser l’activisme politique en ligne est devenu une émission culte pour ces fans. Ensuite nous analysons deux études de cas. Dans la première, nous nous concentrons sur un exemple de la participation des fans du The Colbert Report afin de démontrer les façons dans lesquelles l’activité des audiences en ligne complique les théories sur l’ironie comme de simples faits d e codages et de décodages. Dans la deuxième étude, nous examinons deux interviews avec des bloggers écrivant sur The Colbert Report et sur The Daily Show afin de suggérer que les pratiques des fans non-seulement couvrent les pratiques politiques, mais démontre une convergence de performances imaginatives, de consommations culturelles, et d’engagements collectifs qui brouillent les frontières entre l’effet et l’activisme. Nous concluons en suggérant que les cultures de fans ont de grandes idées dans la production de la signification et dans l’engagement civique des mondes médiatisés et qu’ils ne peuvent pas être séparés des questions de modes contemporaines d’expression politique en ligne.


Are They For Real? Activism and Ironic Identities

Amber Day
Bryant University

Abstract: A new breed of political activist has begun to appear on the streets and in the news. They are no longer trying to out-shout their opponents, but are agreeing with them instead, enthusiastically taking their adversary’s position to exaggerated extremes. It is a practice here termed “identity-nabbing,” in which participants pretend to be someone they are not, appearing in public as exaggerated caricatures of their opponents or ambiguously co-opting some of their power. This paper focuses on three groups in particular: The Billionaires for Bush, Reverend Billy, and the Yes Men. Each group stages elaborate, ironically humorous stunts as a means of attracting public attention to particular political/social issues. The ironic frame not only provides entertainment value, but also contains its own community-building function, as it requires the participation of the audience to actively read it ironically. Banking on the pre-existence of communiti es that share their assumptions and get the joke, these groups attempt to turn what Linda Hutcheon refers to as “discursive communities” into political communities (or counterpublics), urging people to actively identify with the importance of the issue at hand, and to continue circulating the critique. They rely on the co-participatory workings of irony to spur people into viewing themselves as a collective with collective power. None of these groups are aiming for revolutionary change, but by turning laughter over a shared joke into anger and engagement they work to attract attention, get others involved, and slowly shift debate.

Est-ce vrai? L’activisme et les identités ironiques : Un nouveau genre d’activiste politique commence à apparaître dans les rues et dans les informations. Il n’est plus question de hurler plus fort que son adversaire, mais a être d’accord avec eux, de prendre avec enthousiasme la position de son adversaire jusqu’à des extrêmes bien exagérées. C’est une pratique appelé ici « identity nabbing » dans lequel les participants prétendent être quelqu’un qu’ils ne sont pas, en apparaissant en public comme caricatures exagérées de leurs adversaires ou bien de façons ambigües, à prendre leur pouvoir. Cette étude se concentre sur trois groupes en particulier : « The Billionaires for Bush », « Rev erend Billy », et « The Yes Men ». Chaque groupe crée et met en scène des coups ironiques et drôles comme façon d’attirer l’attention du publique vers des problèmes politiques ou sociaux particuliers. Ce cadrage ironique non seulement offre un divertissement, mais aussi contient sa fonction de construire sa propre communauté, du fait que la participation de son audience oblige à le lire de façon ironique. En comptant sur l’existence des communautés qui partagent leurs suppositions et comprennent la blague, ces groupes tentent de tourner ce que Linda Hutcheon appelle les « communautés discursives » en communautés politique en poussant les gens à s’identifier avec l’importance de ce problème et de continuer à circuler la critique. Ils dépendent de la participation du mécanisme de l&rsq uo;ironie à pousser les gens à se voir comme une collective avec des pouvoirs collectifs. Aucun de ces groupes ne cherche un changement révolutionnaire, mais en tournant l’humour d’une blague en mécontentement et en engagement, ils cherchent à attirer l’attention mais aussi a attirer d’autres gens à participer et de changer lentement ce débat.


Naming and Shaming: News Satire and Symbolic Power

Graham Meikle
University of Stirling, UK

Abstract: This essay argues two key points about the importance of media satirists. First, satirists draw attention to the workings of media power — in particular, they open up an analysis of media in terms of symbolic power. Second, satire matters to media scholars because there are clear parallels between satire on the one hand and academic media criticism on the other, and a consideration of these parallels can help set each in a fresh context. The essay first defines symbolic power, before identifying the key actors and groups who are able to exercise it in relation to news and current affairs. It then argues that satirists occupy a crucial position in relation to the news, able to simultaneously critique symbolic power while exercising it themselves. For this reason, because it operates in and simultaneously exposes a particular fault line in the operations of symbolic power, media satire should be taken more seriously by media scholars, not least because of the parallels between the underlying objectives of both satirists and communications academics. Both satirists and analysts seek to call attention to perceived failings, to call the powerful to account, and both could benefit from serious engagement with each other's work.

Nommer et donner honte : la satire des nouvelles et le pouvoir symbolique : Cet essai argumente deux points primordiaux dans l’importance des satiristes du média. Premièrement, les satiristes portent l’attention sur la façon dont les médias ont leurs pouvoirs. En particulier, les satiristes offrent une analyse des médias en termes de pouvoir symbolique. Deuxièmement, la satire a de l’importance pour les chercheurs des médias parce qu’il existe des parallèles clairs entre la satire d’un côté et la critique académique des médias de l’autre. Une considération de ces parallèles peut aider chaque groupe dans un nouveau contexte. Cet essai défini en premier la puissance symbolique avant d’identifier les gens et les groupes importants qui sont en mesure de l&rs quo;exercer en relation aux informations et aux affaires courantes. L’essai continue en faisant l’argument que les satiristes occupent une position primordiale en relation avec les nouvelles, étant en mesure d’être simultanément une puissance symbolique critique tout en l’utilisant eux-mêmes. Pour cette raison, parce qu’elle opère à l’intérieur tout en exposant une fissure particulière dans le monde consensuel des opérations de la puissance symbolique, la satire médiatique devrait être prise plus au sérieux par les chercheurs des médias du simple fait des parallèles qui existent entre les objectifs des satiristes et des académiques de la communication. Les satiristes et les analystes cherchent à apporter l’attention aux carences perçus, d’appeler les gens puissants à être responsable, et ainsi, les d eux pourraient bénéficier d’engagement sérieux du travail de l’un et de l’autre.


Special Section
Forum on the Film Borat: Cultural Learnings of America for Make Benefit Glorious Nation of Kazakhstan (2006)

Versions of the essays by Christie Davies, Paul Lewis, John Morreall, and Elliott Oring collected here were originally presented in a plenary panel on Borat organized by Paul Lewis for the International Society for Humor Studies conference, Salve Regina College, June 28-July 1, 2007. The panel abstract called on speakers to consider such matters as the relation between Borat (the character and the film) and ethnic joke traditions; the range of audience and critical responses to the film; the persuasive impact of satire; and what a self-conscious and deliberately provocative comic work like this can contribute to the study of humor.

Section spéciale
Un forum sur le film Borat, leçons culturelles sur l’Amérique au profit glorieuse nation Kazakhstan (2006)

Les versions des essais par Christie Davies, Paul Lewis, Lawrence E. Mintz, John Morreall, et Elliott Oring ici présent avaient été présentées dans un débat plénier sur Borat organisé par Paul Lewis pour la conférence de la Société international pour les études de l’humour qui a eu lieu du 28 juin au 1er juillet 2007 à Salve Regina College. Il avait été demandé aux présentateurs de considérer comme sujet la relation entre Borat (le caractère et le film) et les traditions des blagues ethniques ; les différents genres de public et leurs réactions au film ; l’impact persuasif de la satire ; et ce qu’un comique provocateur comme celui-ci peut contribuer à l’étude de l’humour.


Copyright 2008 Communication Institute for Online Scholarship, Inc.

This file may not be publicly distributed or reproduced without written permission of the Communication Institute for Online Scholarship,

P.O. Box 57, Rotterdam Jct., NY 12150 USA (phone: 518-887-2443).