Communication Institute for Online Scholarship
Communication Institute for Online Scholarship Continous online service and innovation since 1986
Site index
 
ComAbstractsVisual Communication Concept ExplorerAbout the CIOSElectronic Journal of CommunicationComVista
EJC logo
Electronic Journal of Communication


Volume 19 Numbers 1 & 2, 2009

New Technologies and Interaction: Contradiction or Symbiosis? / Les nouvelles technologies et l’interaction : contradiction ou symbiose ?

With Special Editor / Avec Éditeur Spéciale :

Wendy Leeds-Hurwitz
University of Wisconsin, Parkside

Editor's Introduction / L’introduction de l’éditeur

Wendy Leeds-Hurwitz
University of Wisconsin, Parkside

Learning LSI Means Doing LSI: Reflections on Technology Use in Two Language and Social Interaction Courses / Apprendre le LSI mais aussi utiliser le LSI : Des réflexions sur l’utilisation de la technologie dans deux cours de langues et d’interactions sociales

Evelyn Y. Ho
University of San Francisco

Christopher J. Koenig
Philip R. Lee Institute for Health Policy Studies, University of California, San Francisco and Palo Alto Medical Foundation Research Institute

Leah Wingard
San Francisco State University

John C. Bansavich
University of San Francisco

Between Text and Talk: Managing Interactional Issues in the IM Interview / Entre le texte et la discussion : organiser les problèmes interactionnel dans les interviews d’IM

Michael Nicholas
University of South Florida

Mariaelena Bartesaghi
University of South Florida

Jane Jorgenson
University of South Florida

Why Wiki?: Using Wiki Software as a Resource for Language and Social Interaction / Pourquoi le wiki ?: Utiliser le logiciel de wiki comme ressource de langue et d’interaction sociale

Theresa Castor, Shi Hae Kim, and Wendy Leeds-Hurwitz
University of Wisconsin-Parkside

The Educators Coop: A Model for Collaboration and LSI Communication Research in the Virtual World / L’association des éducateurs : un modèle de recherche dans la collaboration et la communication du LSI dans le monde virtuel

Leslie Jarmon
University of Texas at Austin

Joe Sanchez
University of Texas at Austin

Visualizing the Future of Interaction Studies: Data Visualization Applications as a Research, Pedagogical, and Presentational Tool for Interaction Scholars / Visualiser le futur de l’interaction des études : les applications des données de visualisation pour la recherche, pour la pédagogie, et comme outil de présentations pour les érudits interactionnels

Corinne Weisgerber and Shannan H. Butler
St. Edward’s University


EJC Research Articles / Articles de recherche de la REC

Exploring the Use of Online Citations in an Online-only Journal: A Case Study of the Journal of Computer-Mediated Communication / Explorer l’utilisation des citations en ligne dans une revue exclusivement en ligne : une étude de cas du Journal of Computer-Mediated Communication

Daniela V. Dimitrova
Iowa State University

Michael Bugeja
Iowa State University

Hiring Trends in Journalism and Mass Communication: A Content Analysis of Faculty Position with a New Media Emphasis / Les tendances d’embauchages dans la communication de masse et dans le journalisme : une analyse de fond des publicités pour les positions d’enseignants avec une emphase sur le nouveau média

Ying Roselyn Du
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill


Editor’s Introduction

New Technologies and Interaction:
Contradiction or Symbiosis?

Wendy Leeds-Hurwitz
University of Wisconsin-Parkside

Most studies of new technologies have been written by media scholars, for obvious reasons. However, this special issue is designed instead from the viewpoint of language and social interaction (LSI) scholars. [1] LSI scholars take for granted the use of audio and video recording of behavior as tools but rarely stop to discuss what they are doing, take stock of what they have learned, or discuss the logic underlying specific choices. The central question guiding this special issue is this: how do LSI scholars use various new technologies? It is uniquely appropriate that discussion of this topic should appear in the Electronic Journal of Communication, which itself relies on new technologies in order to permit longer articles supplemented by more visual images than would be possible in a traditional printed journal.

From its earliest days, LSI research has relied on recordings of human behavior. Bateson and Mead’s Balinese Character (1942) was one of the first studies to analyze photographs of social interaction, followed by further use of photographs in Ruesch and Kees (1956), and then filmed interaction in McQuown (published in 1971, but based on research in the 1950s involving Bateson, Ray Birdwhistell and others). Although the term LSI was not yet in use, clearly these were all early LSI studies. Scheflen, known for his own early use of photographs as a research tool in studying nonverbal behavior, specifically credits Bateson with understanding the need to obtain an audiovisual recording of interaction as a precursor to analysis (1973).

Some LSI scholars follow these traditions and use technology primarily in their own research, while others now use it to teach their students how to conduct research, or as a way of moving beyond text-based presentations of research results to colleagues at conferences. This special issue developed as a result of a preconference, “Using Technology in Language and Social Interaction Research, Teaching and Presentations,” which was sponsored by the Language and Social Interaction Division of the National Communication Association convention in Chicago, held in 2007. John W. Lannamann and I were co-organizers and co-chairs. As not all of the presenters were able to prepare their papers for publication for this issue, I would like to acknowledge them here: Madeline Maxwell, Scott V. Anderson, Isabel Pedersen, and Jeffrey D. Robinson. That preconference incorporated discussion of DVDs, CDs, the Internet, digital audio and video cameras, iPods, Wikis, moving scre en captures, PowerPoint, and Transana which, taken together, form a small subset of the growing list of tools used to enhance the work of interaction scholars. The goal of this special issue is to pause and evaluate what we already know works in particular contexts, and determine what else we need to learn.

A wide range of current and new technologies could have been included. Out of that number, what are described here are a few of those most readers will have at least heard about, if not used themselves. Three articles present specific case studies: using digital audio and video recorders to teach either ethnography or conversation analysis (Ho, Koenig, Wingard & Bansavich); using instant messenger (IM) to conduct research interviews (Nicholas, Bartesaghi & Jorgenson); and using a wiki to coordinate a whole class ethnographic project (Castor, Kim & Leeds-Hurwitz). Two articles are more general introductions to technologies less likely to be in current use, but with substantial possibilities for LSI teaching, research, and presentatio ns: Second Life, a three-dimensional world (Jarmon & Sanchez), and Many Eyes, a data visualization tool capable of creating tag clouds and word trees (Weisgerber & Butler).

Several issues cut across these articles. Anyone using a new form of technology in a course for the first time quickly discovers that teaching students to manage unfamiliar technology takes time that could otherwise be spent discussing theory or analyzing data. One solution, as mentioned in these articles is to use a technology assistant (either regular computer lab assistants, or students who have mastered the same technology in a prior course) to help outside of class hours. The solution, of course, will be that, when a critical mass of faculty integrates the same new technology into their courses, setting time aside for specific teaching of the equipment in any one course will no longer be necessary. Until then, most of us feel that the new technologies permit us to do something that is not possible, or at least not as easy, without them. As Koenig (2008) puts it: “Yes, technology takes time to learn and it also takes time away from o ther aspects of the class, which is a drawback. The benefit, however, is that through technology students can experience the process of communication using analytic technologies that have been—up until very recently—only available to scholars.”

A related issue faced by authors here was how much detail to present to readers about the basics of how to manage the new technologies, and specifically about how to integrate the various technologies into their courses, as compared to spending time using the technologies to reveal new insights about more traditional LSI topics. In fact, several reviewers expressed concern that space was devoted to explaining what some of them already knew; obviously, determining just how much knowledge on the part of potential readers could be assumed was not easy. Again, it seems to me likely that the problem will resolve itself as more of these technologies are adopted by more LSI scholars for various purposes; explicit description of what they are and how they work will become moot once they can be taken for granted.

The advantage of using new technologies in research is that they can spark new insights. There is a substantive difference between discussing in words what was learned from a research project, and showing it visually. This has implications for individual research as well as for group projects and teaching, and perhaps most directly, for presentation of research results. LSI researchers today take for granted that playing an audio or video clip from their data is expected at a conference, and have moved to showing what is worthy of attention, and what their analysis reveals about interaction, through a wider variety of tools. If the tools help either in the discovery of new insights, or the presentation of those insights to others, they are well worth the time spent learning how to manage them.

The choice of which technologies are used for which purposes (whether that purpose aids research, teaching, or presentations) is currently in flux, and there is no one right answer for everyone. The intent of this special issue is to open the conversation. Hopefully others will join the discussion about what tool works best in what context. Our concern is not with the technologies themselves, but about what they can permit us to learn in our own research, what they can help our students discover, and what they can help us share with colleagues when we talk about either.

References

Bateson, G., & Mead, M. (1942). Balinese character: A photographic analysis. New York: New York Academy of Sciences.

Koenig, C. J. (2008). Personal communication.

McQuown, N. (Ed.). (1971). The natural history of an interview. Microfilm Collection of Manuscripts on Cultural Anthropology, Fifteenth Series. Chicago: University of Chicago, Joseph Regenstein Library, Department of Photoduplication.

Ruesch, J., & Kees, W. (1956). Nonverbal communication. Berkeley: University of California Press.

Scheflen, A. E. (1973). Communicational structure: Analysis of a psychotherapy transaction. Bloomington: Indiana University Press.

[1] Thanks to Teri Harrison, who immediately saw the logic of preparing these papers for The Electronic Journal of Communication and so offered us a congenial home for this special issue. Thanks as well to the reviewers of these papers: Robert Agne, Charles Braithwaite, Aaron Cargile, Paul Denvir, Phil Glenn, Beth Haslett, Julien Miravel, Matthew McGlone, Siri Mehus, Dan Modaff, John Modaff, Bud Morris, Jorge Pena, Sean Rintel, and Jeff Robinson. As always, blind peer review simply would not be possible without the generous commitment of time by our colleagues. And thanks to Christopher Koenig for helpful comments on this introduction.

L’introduction de l’éditeur

Les nouvelles technologies et l’interaction :
contradiction ou symbiose ?

Wendy Leeds-Hurwitz
University of Wisconsin-Parkside

La plupart des études sur les nouvelles technologies ont été écrites par des érudits des médias pour des raisons évidentes. Cependant, ce numéro spécial a été conçu du point de vue des érudits sur le langage et l’interaction sociale (LSI). [1] Les érudits du LSI acceptent sans discuter l’utilisation des machines d’enregistrements audio et vidéo de comportements comme outils mais s’arrêtent rarement pour discuter de ce qu’ils font, de ce qu’ils ont appris, ou encore s’arrêtent de discuter de la logique utilisée pour leurs choix spécifiques. La question centrale qui guide cette édition spéciale est la suivante : comment est-ce que les érudits du LSI utilisent les nouvelles technologies existantes ? Il est to ut à fait acceptable que ce sujet doive apparaitre dans Le Journal Electronique de Communication qui lui-même utilise les nouvelles technologies afin de permettre des articles plus long a être supplémenter par plus d’images visuelles que ne serait possible dans un journal imprimé traditionnel.

Depuis son origine, la recherche du LSI dépend sur les enregistrements du comportement humain. L’œuvre de Balinese Character (1942) par Bateson et Mead, a été l’une des premières études à analyser l’interaction sociale qui existe dans les photographies et qui a été suivi par l’utilisation de d’autres photos par Ruesch et Kees (1956) qui ont été ensuite filmé dans l’interaction de McQuown (publié en 1971 mais basé sur des recherches faites dans les années 1950 comprenant Bateson, Ray Birdwhisstell et d’autres). Bien que le terme LSI ne fût pas encore utilisé, il n’y a aucun doute que tous ces travaux étaient des études du LSI. Scheflen, connu pour son utilisation précoce de photos comme outil de recherche pour étudier le comportement non verbale, a spécifiquement donné crédit à Bateson d’avoir compris le besoin d’obtenir un enregistrement audiovisuel de l’interaction comme précurseur de l’analyse (1973).

Certains érudits du LSI suivent ces traditions et utilisent la technologie principalement pour leurs propres recherches cependant que d’autres utilisent le LSI pour enseigner à leurs étudiants comment faire des recherches ou encore comment passer au-delà des résultats de recherches basés sur des présentations textuelles à des collègues aux conférences. Cette édition spéciale a été développée grâce a une pré-conférence intitulé « Using Technology in Language and Social Interaction Reseach, Teaching and Presentations » et dont le sponsor avait été La division des langues et de l’interaction sociale de l’Association nationale de communication qui a eu lieu à Chicago en 2007. John W. Lannamann et moi étions les coorganisateurs et les coprésidents. Du fait que bien des présentateurs n’étaient pas en mesure de préparer des articles pour la publication de cette édition, je souhaite les reconnaitre ici : Madeline Maxwell, Scott V. Anderson, Isabel Pedersen, et Jeffrey D. Robinson. Cette pré-conférence a incorporé des discussions sur les DVD, les CD, l’Internet, les appareils numériques audio et vidéo, les iPod, les Wiki, les PowerPoint, et Transana qui créent, quand pris ensemble, une petite partie d’une liste d’outils qui est utilisé pour améliorer le travail interactionnelle des spécialistes. Le but de cette édition spéciale est d’interrompre et d’évaluer ce que nous savons marche déjà dans certains contextes afin de déterminer ce que nous avons encore besoin d’apprendre.   

Un nombre important de technologies actuelles et nouvelles auraient pu être inclus. De ce chiffre, celles qui sont décris ici font partis de ceux que la plupart des lecteurs auront au moins entendus, si ce n’est de les avoir utilisé eux-mêmes. Trois articles présentent des études de cas spécifiques : l’utilisation d’appareils numériques audio et visuels pour enseigner soit l’ethnographie ou bien l’analyse de conversation (Ho, Koenig, Wingard et Bansavich) ; utiliser les messages instantanés afin de faire des recherches par interviews (Nicholas, Bartesaghi et Jorgenson) ; et utiliser un wiki afin de coordonner sur une classe entière un projet ethnographique (Castor, Kim et Leeds-Hurwitz). Deux articles offrent des introductions plus générales sur des technologies étant moins probable d’être utilisé couramment mais offrant des possibilités importantes sur l’enseignement, la recherche et les présentations du LSI : Second Life, un monde trois dimensionnel (Jarmon et Sanchez), et Many Eyes, un outil de données visuelles capable de créer des marqueurs et des ensembles de mots (Weisgerber et Butler).  

Plusieurs problèmes apparaissent à travers ces articles. Qui que ce soit qui utilise une nouvelle forme de technologie dans un cours pour la première fois se rend compte qu’enseigner des étudiants à manager des technologies peu familières prend beaucoup de temps qui aurait pu être utilisé à discuter la théorie ou bien à analyser des données. Une solution, mentionnée dans ces articles, est d’utiliser un assistant pour la technologie (soit un assistant d’informatique, ou bien des étudiants ayant déjà perfectionné la même technologie dans un autre cours) afin d’aider les étudiants en dehors des heures de cours. La solution, bien évidemment, sera que, quand un nombre important de professeurs intégrerons cette nouvelle technologie dans leurs cours, il ne sera plus nécessaire de mettre du temps à ; part afin de comprendre cette nouvelle technologie. Jusqu’à ce que ce jour arrive, nous pensons que les nouvelles technologies nous permettrons de faire quelque chose qui n’est pas possible, ou du moins pas facile, sans celles-ci. Comme Koenig (2008) l’explique : « oui, il faut du temps pour apprendre la technologie et cela prend aussi du temps de certains autres aspects de la classe, ce qui est un inconvénient. L’avantage cependant est qu’à travers la technologie, les étudiants peuvent ressentir l’expérience du processus de communication en utilisant l’analytique des technologies qui étaient, jusqu’à très récemment, seulement disponible aux érudits. »

Un problème commun touchant les auteurs ici était de décider quel niveau de détails était nécessaire à présenter aux lecteurs sur la façon d’employer les nouvelles technologies et plus spécifiquement comment intégrer les technologies variées dans leurs cours en comparant le temps passé à utiliser les technologies afin de révéler de nouvelles découvertes sur les sujets plus traditionnels du LSI. En fait, plusieurs critiques ont exprimé leurs doutes que beaucoup d’espace était dévoué à expliquer ce que certains savaient déjà. Evidemment, déterminer les connaissances de la part de certains lecteurs pouvait être difficile à déterminer. Il me semble probable que le problème va se résoudre tout seul une fois que les nouvelles technologies sont adoptée s par les érudits du LSI pour des raisons diverses. Les descriptions explicites de ce que ces technologies sont et de la façon dont elles fonctionnent n’auront plus d’importances une fois qu’elles seront prises comme acquis.

L’avantage d’utiliser les nouvelles technologies dans la recherche est que cela peut provoquer de nouvelles idées. Il y a une différence importante qui existe entre expliquer par mot ce qui a été appris dans un projet de recherche et le montrer visuellement. Cela a des implications pour les recherches individuelles de même que pour les projets de groupes et d’enseignement, et peut être plus directement, pour la présentation des résultats de recherche. Les chercheurs du LSI aujourd’hui reconnaissent que d’avoir un clip vidéo ou audio de leurs données est attendu dans une conférence et ils se sont pris à montrer ce qui a de la valeur ainsi que de dévoiler ce que leurs analyses révèlent des interactions à travers une variété d’outils. Si les outils aident soit dans la découverte de nouvelles idées ou dans la présentation de nouvelles idées à d’autres, c’est un merveilleux moyen d’apprendre à les utiliser.

Le choix présenté de savoir quelles technologies sont utilisées pour quelles raisons (que ce soit pour la recherche, l’enseignement, ou les présentations) est en ce moment dans un état de perpétuel changement et aucune réponse n’est la bonne pour tout le monde. Le but de cette édition spéciale est de publicisé cette conversation. Avec de la chance, d’autres gens vont joindre cette discussion au sujet de quels outils marchent le mieux dans des contextes précis. Notre préoccupation n’est pas avec les technologies mêmes, mais avec ce quelles peuvent nous permettre d’apprendre dans nos propre recherche, comment elles peuvent aider nos étudiants à faire des découvertes, et comment elles peuvent nous aider à partager avec nos collègues quand nous discutons de ces deux concepts.

Références

Bateson, G., & Mead, M. (1942). Balinese character: A photographic analysis. New York: New York Academy of Sciences.

Koenig, C. J. (2008). Personal communication.

McQuown, N. (Ed.). (1971). The natural history of an interview. Microfilm Collection of Manuscripts on Cultural Anthropology, Fifteenth Series. Chicago: University of Chicago, Joseph Regenstein Library, Department of Photoduplication.

Ruesch, J., & Kees, W. (1956). Nonverbal communication. Berkeley: University of California Press.

Scheflen, A. E. (1973). Communicational structure: Analysis of a psychotherapy transaction. Bloomington: Indiana University Press.

Note

[1] Merci à Teri Harrison qui a immédiatement vu la logique de préparer ces études pour La revue électronique de communication et nous a offert un lieu pour cette édition spéciale. Merci aussi aux critiques de ces études : Robert Agne, Charles Braithwaite, Aaron Cargile, Paul Denvir, Phil Glenn, Beth Haslett, Julien Miravel, Matthew McGlone, Siri Mehus, Dan Modaff, John Modaff, Bud Morris, Jorge Pena, Sean Rintel, et Jeff Robinson. Comme toujours, les révisions par les collègues ne seraient pas possible sans leurs générosités de temps. Et merci à Christopher Koenig pour ces commentaires utiles sur cette introduction.


Learning LSI means doing LSI:
Reflections on technology use in two Language and Social Interaction courses

Evelyn Y. Ho
University of San Francisco

Christopher J. Koenig
Philip R. Lee Institute for Health Policy Studies, University of California, San Francisco et Palo Alto Medical Foundation Research Institute

Leah Wingard
San Francisco State University

John C. Bansavich
University of San Francisco

Abstract: This article reflects on the role of technology in teaching two LSI research methods courses with a focus on ethnography of communication and discourse analysis, respectively. Presented as case studies, we describe two LSI scholars’ experiences and explain our choices in using technology to teach these two undergraduate LSI courses. We describe how technology is used at four key points throughout the research process: capturing communicative practices, preserving them, documenting them through analysis and finally presenting the results. Throughout this process, we show how the use of technology facilitates the teaching and learning experience. The use of technology enables students to see and to hear communication as situated and contextualized. Finally, we argue that the communication studies curriculum overall is enriched because students must confront their own preconceptions of the process of communication by coming to terms with naturally occ urring interaction.

Apprendre le LSI mais aussi utiliser le LSI : Des réflexions sur l’utilisation de la technologie dans deux cours de langues et d’interactions sociales  :  Cet article reflète sur le rôle de la technologie à enseigner deux cours de méthodes de recherche du LSI avec une concentration sur l’ethnographie de la communication et l’analyse du discours. Présenté comme des études de cas, nous décrivons les expériences de deux érudits du LSI et expliquons nos choix dans l’utilisation de la technologie pour enseigner ces deux cours du LSI aux étudiants. Nous expliquons comment la technologie est utilisée à quatre points stratégiques à travers le processus de recherche : saisir les pratiques communicatives, les préserver, les documenter à travers des analyses et enfin, présenter les résultats. A travers ce processus, nous démontrons comment l’utilisation de la technologie facilite l’enseignement et l’expérience d’apprentissage. l’utilisation de la tec hnologie permet aux étudiants de voir et d’entendre la communication dans une situation spécifique et dans un contexte spécifique. Finalement, nous faisons un argument en faveur du curriculum pour des études de communication qui est enrichit parce que les étudiants doivent affronter leurs propres parti pris du processus de communication en acceptant l’interaction qui se produit naturellement.


Between Text and Talk:
Managing Interactional Issues in the IM Interview

Michael Nicholas
University of South Florida

Mariaelena Bartesaghi
University of South Florida

Jane Jorgenson
University of South Florida

Abstract: In this article we adopt a discursive approach in analyzing the transcripts of qualitative interviews conducted via Instant Messenger. Our aim is to show how interview participants cope with the distinctive interactional troubles occasioned by a “real-time,” text-based online medium. In making interviews the topic of inquiry rather using them simply as a resource for apprehending the lifeworld of participants, we follow the tradition of LSI which conceptualizes research interviews as sites for the strategic management of often different discursive goals of interviewer and interviewee. We focus in our analysis on how interviewers and interviewees appropriate textual features in ways specific to this medium in order to uphold conversational rules and roles, and in so doing, collaborate to fulfill the multifunctional research endeavor.

Entre le texte et la discussion : organiser les problèmes interactionnel dans les interviews d’IM  :  Dans cet article nous adoptons une approche discursive en analysant les copies des interviews qualitatives à travers la messagerie instantanée. Notre but est de montrer comment les participants des interviews se débrouillent avec les difficultés distinctives interactionnelles mis en place par un médium textuel basé en ligne et en temps réel. En rendant les interviews le sujet d’enquête plutôt que de les utilisées simplement comme ressource pour saisir la vie des participants, nous suivons la tradition du LSI qui conceptualise les recherches d’interviews comme lieu de gestion pour les buts différents qui existe entre intervieweurs et personnes interviewées. Nous concentrons notre analyse sur la façon dont ces gens s’approprient ces traits de façons spécifiques pour ce médium afin de confirmer les règles et les rôles de conversations, et ce f aisant, collaborer afin de réaliser cette recherche multifonctionnelle.


Why Wiki?:
Using Wiki Software as a Resource for Language and Social Interaction

Theresa Castor, Shi Hae Kim, and Wendy Leeds-Hurwitz
University of Wisconsin-Parkside

Abstract: Wikis are a new form of technology recently introduced to courses in various disciplines; LSI courses can take advantage of what they have to offer. In this article, we provide basic background information on wiki software and elaborate on its applications for research on the part of either professional researchers or students. As an illustration, we describe how a wiki was utilized to facilitate learning in a multidisciplinary classroom context. We conclude with reflections on what was learned about how to effectively integrate a wiki into college-level classes that emphasize LSI research and collaborative learning.

Pourquoi le wiki ?: Utiliser le logiciel de wiki comme ressource de langue et d’interaction sociale :  Les wikis sont une nouvelle forme de technologie récemment introduites dans des cours à disciplines variées. Les cours de LSI peuvent tirer avantage de ce qu’ils offrent. Dans cet article, nous offrons une formation minimale sur le logiciel de wiki et nous élaborons sur des applications pour la recherche de la part des chercheurs professionnels ou des étudiants. Comme illustration, nous décrivons comment un wiki a été utilisé pour faciliter l’apprentissage dans un contexte de classe multidisciplinaire. Nous concluons avec des réflexions de ce qui a été appris de la façon à comment intégrer le wiki dans des classes au niveau universitaire qui mettent l’emphase dans la recherche du LSI et dans l’apprentissage collaboratif.


The Educators Coop:
A Model for Collaboration and LSI Communication Research in the Virtual World

Leslie Jarmon
University of Texas at Austin

Joe Sanchez
University of Texas at Austin

Abstract: Three-dimensional virtual worlds will be a widely used knowledge-and-social-interaction tool and will become another part of the socio-technical system that many people use for communication, whether for work or play, in the foreseeable future. This paper presents an approach that LSI researchers and educators (and other communication scholars) can take for their entry into this new 3-D virtual public and private sphere of interaction. We discuss LSI scholars as users of the technology, specifically Second Life®, to enhance collaboration with colleagues and to enable scholars to extend some very practical research and educational operations into virtual spaces. Secondarily, we briefly discuss some possible foci for LSI research, including some emerging communication practices. The paper concludes with a brief look at current challenges for LSI researchers with 3-D virtual world technologies.

L’association des éducateurs : un modèle de recherche dans la collaboration et la communication du LSI dans le monde virtuel :  Le monde virtuel à trois dimensions sera largement utilisé comme outil de connaissance et d’interaction sociale et deviendra une autre partie du système social et technique que beaucoup de gens utilise pour la communication, que ce soit pour le travail ou le loisir, dans le futur proche. Cette étude présente une approche que les chercheurs du LSI et les pédagogues (ainsi que d’autres érudits de la communication) peuvent entreprendre afin de faire leurs entrées dans cette interaction virtuelle des sphères privées et public de ce monde à trois dimensions. Nous discutons des érudits du LSI comme utilisateurs de la technologie, en particulier Second Life®, afin d’améliorer la collaboration entre collègues et de permettre aux érudits de prolonger des recherches réalisable et des opérations éducationnelles dans l’espace virtuel. Nous di scutons brièvement ensuite d’un moyen possible de focaliser la recherche du LSI en incluant des pratiques de communication naissantes. Cette étude conclus sur les défis qui font face aux chercheurs du LSI avec les technologies du monde virtuel à trois dimensions.


Visualizing the Future of Interaction Studies:
Data Visualization Applications as a Research, Pedagogical, and Presentational Tool for Interaction Scholars

Corinne Weisgerber and Shannan H. Butler
St. Edward’s University

Abstract: The advent of the social web, or web 2.0, has brought with it an array of data visualization tools developed to help amateur and professional researchers alike uncover new patterns in large data sets. This paper examines one such tool and illustrates how visualization types such as tag clouds and word trees can be incorporated into language and social interaction scholarship and pedagogy. The paper contends that data visualizations can enhance all phases of qualitative coding by facilitating hypothesis formation and moving analysis from a mere description of the data into the realm of conceptualization and theory development. Visualization technologies are also argued to play a role in the validation of research findings by supporting qualitative validity measures such as member checks and reflexive journaling. Finally, issues of data privacy are addressed and pedagogical and presentational applications are explored.

Visualiser le futur de l’interaction des études : les applications des données de visualisation pour la recherche, pour la pédagogie, et comme outil de présentations pour les érudits interactionnel :  l’apparition du web social, ou le web 2.0, a apporté avec lui tout un échantillon de données d’outils de visualisation développé afin d’aider les chercheurs amateurs et professionnels à découvrir de nouvelles tendances dans de grandes banques de données. Cette étude examine un de ces outils en particulier et illustre comment certains types de visualisation telle que les marqueurs et les mots généalogiques peuvent être incorporés dans des interactions sociales et linguistiques ainsi que pédagogiques. Cette étude soutient que les visualisations de données peuvent améliorer toutes les phases du codage qualitatif en facilitant la formation de l’hypothèse et en bougeant l’analyse d’une simple description de données dans le domaine de la conceptualisation et du développement théorique. Les technologies de visualisations sont aussi soutenu de jouer un rôle dans la validation des résultats de recherche en soutenant la validité des mesures qualitatives tels que les contrôles par les membres et la journalisation réflective. Finalement, les problèmes de données privées sont adressés et les demandes pédagogiques et certaines raisons de présentation sont explorées.


Exploring the use of online citations in an online-only journal:
A case study of the Journal of Computer-Mediated Communication

Daniela V. Dimitrova
Iowa State University

Michael Bugeja
Iowa State University

Abstract: This study focused on one of the most prominent online-only journals in the area of communication, the Journal of Computer-Mediated Communication. Using a case study approach, we analyzed all articles published over a four-year period (2000-2003), measuring how many of their online citations remained accessible in 2005. More than 35 percent of the URLs cited were inaccessible. Factors that affect the stability of online citations were identified and discussed. We also reviewed both positive and negative characteristics of online journals and offered recommendations for scholars and journals editors.

Explorer l’utilisation des citations en ligne dans une revue exclusivement en ligne : une étude de cas du Journal of Computer-Mediated Communication :  Cette étude se concentre sur l’un des journaux en ligne les plus proéminent dans le monde de la communication, le Journal of Computer-Mediated Communication. En utilisant une approche d’étude de cas, nous avons analysé tous les articles ayant été publié sur une période de quatre ans (2000-2003) en mesurant combien de citations en ligne sont restées accessible en 2005. Plus de 35 pourcent des URL citées était inaccessible. Certains facteurs qui ont touchés la stabilité des citations en ligne ont été identifiés et discuter. Nous avons aussi revu les caractéristiques positives et négatives des journaux en ligne et avons offert des recommandations pour les érudits et les rédacteurs de journaux.


Hiring Trends in Journalism and Mass Communication:
A Content Analysis of Faculty Position with a New Media Emphasis

Ying Roselyn Du
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Abstract: This study is a content analysis of positions advertised by Journalism and Mass Communication (JMC) programs that are seeking new media faculty. It provides an overview of the hiring trends in the discipline. Credentials, requirements, duties, and expectations set forth in the faculty opening advertisements are identified. Results show a striking growth in the demand for new media faculty. Overall, institutions are seeking Ph.D.s who have significant professional experience in addition to teaching and research experience. In particular, new media positions require extensive new-media-specific expertise. The study attempts to provide useful indicators of the employment outlook and hiring trends for applicants seeking new media and technology teaching positions. It also seeks to enable applicants to have a better sense of what employers want and for which positions they should realistically apply. Additionally, the results of this study are useful to journ alism and mass communication schools, departments, or programs in search of future new media faculty.

Les tendances d’embauchages dans la communication de masse et dans le journalisme : une analyse de fond des publicités pour les positions d’enseignants avec une emphase sur le nouveau média :  Cette étude est une analyse de fond pour des offres d’emplois publiées dans des programmes de communication de masse et de journalisme qui cherchent un professeur pour enseigner le nouveau média. Cette étude offre une vue d’ensemble des tendances d’embauchages dans cette discipline. Les qualifications, les diplômes exigés, les fonctions et les attentes sont identifiés dans les annonces. Les résultats montrent une croissance importante d’une demande pour des professeurs enseignant le nouveau média. Les institutions cherchent des professeurs ayant un doctorat mais aussi une expérience professionnelle importante en plus de leurs expériences d’enseignants et de recherches. En particulier, ces positions du nouveau média exigent une expérience spécifique du nouveau média. Cette étude cherche à offrir des indicateurs utiles pour les pers pectives d’emploi et les tendances d’embauche pour les candidats cherchant des emplois comme professeurs dans la technologie et le nouveau média. Cette étude cherche aussi à donner aux candidats une meilleure idée de ce que les employeurs veulent ainsi que d’être judicieux dans les positions à postuler ayant une chance d’aboutir à un emploi. De plus, les résultats de cette recherche sont utiles pour les écoles de communication et de journalisme, ainsi que pour les départements et les programmes cherchant un futur professeur de nouveau média.


Copyright 2009 Communication Institute for Online Scholarship, Inc.

This file may not be publicly distributed or reproduced without written permission of the Communication Institute for Online Scholarship,

P.O. Box 57, Rotterdam Jct., NY 12150 USA (phone: 518-887-2443).