Communication Institute for Online Scholarship
Communication Institute for Online
Scholarship Continous online service and innovation
since 1986
Site index
 
ComAbstracts Visual Communication Concept Explorer Tables of Contents Electronic Journal of Communication ComVista

EJC 20(1 & 2): Communication Pedagogy in the Age of Social Media / La pédagogie de la communication dans l’âge du média social
EJC logo
Electronic Journal of Communication
Volume 20 Numbers 1 & 2, 2010

Communication Pedagogy in the Age of Social Media /
La pédagogie de la communication dans l’âge du média social

With Special Editors / Avec éditeurs spéciales :

Corinne Weisgerber and Shannan H. Butler
St. Edward’s University

Editors’ Introduction / L’introduction des éditeurs

Corinne Weisgerber and Shannan H. Butler
St. Edward’s University

Online/offline Communications Pedagogy: YouTube and the Development of an Electronic Citizenry / Pédagogie de communications en ligne et hors ligne : YouTube et le développement d’une société électronique

Kathleen M. Kuehn
The Pennsylvania State University

Communication and Civic Participation: Promoting Engaged Citizenship through Digital Filmmaking / Communication et participation civique : promouvoir la citoyenneté par l’intermédiaire de la réalisation de films numériques

Sharon Jarvis and Soo-Hye Han
University of Texas at Austin

Speaking the Language of Digital Natives: Role-playing Simulations in the Communication Classroom / Parlant la langue des autochtones numérique : le rôle du jeu dans la communication en salle de classe

Christian Spielvogel
Hope College

Laura Ginsberg Spielvogel
Western Michigan University

Writing in Public: Pedagogical Uses of Blogging in the Communication Course / Ecrire en public : l’utilisation pédagogique de blogs dans les cours de communication

Carrie Anne Platt
North Dakota State University

Creating a Learning Community: Social and Educational Benefits of using Facebook in a Mixed-major College Classroom / Création d’une communauté d’apprentissage : avantages sociaux et les bénéfices d’utiliser Facebook dans une classe mixte d’université

Yifeng Hu
The College of New Jersey


EJC Special Contribution

On the Binding Biases of Time: Korzybski, Innis, and the Future of the Present / Sur les préjugés du temps : Korzybski, Innis et l’avenir du present

Lance Strate
Fordham University


Editors’ Introduction
Communication Pedagogy in the Age of Social Media

Corinne Weisgerber & Shannan H. Butler
St. Edward’s University

In a matter of only a few years’ time, innovations in communication technologies have multiplied on a scale never before seen, revolutionizing not only the way we communicate, but also how we relate to one another. At the time of this writing, Facebook’s 350 million active users are posting more than 55 million status updates each day and sharing roughly 3.5 billion pieces of content in the form of web links, news stories, blog posts, etc. each week (Facebook Statistics, n.d. ). Meanwhile, over on the popular microblogging platform Twitter, more than 20 million tweets are published each day (Gigatweet, n.d. ). What these numbers tell us is that people are flocking to the Internet in order to upload pictures, share videos, tell stories, and simply connect with others. Together, they are expected to create more data in one year than has been generated in the entire history of civilization (Weigend, 2009 ).

In many ways, the changes new social media technologies have brought about are so profound that they don’t stop at the classroom door, instead, they permeate and extend the pedagogical space. And why shouldn’t they? The students enrolled in our classes today are considered digital natives (Prensky, 2001), individuals who have grown up in a digital environment and come to expect it as the norm. Theirs is a world of computers, gaming consoles, MP3 players, and smartphones – a world where smartboards have replaced chalkboards and laptops serve as the new paper and pen. Although critics may see the constant connectedness offered by these new participatory technologies as a distraction hindering effective learning and resist the idea of incorporating such technologies into our classrooms, it is difficult to deny that blogs, microblogs, wikis, and social networks are quickly transforming, if not the classroom itself, then at least the learning environment our students operate in.

This special issue of the Electronic Journal of Communication seeks to explore how communication educators are taking advantage of the new pedagogical opportunities afforded by various social media technologies. The issue was born out of the idea that since many of these technologies center around concepts of collaboration, participation, and conversation, they should hold special interest to communication researchers and educators. With this issue, we wanted to provide a forum for communication educators to examine the pedagogical applications of social media technologies and to present best practice examples of social media adoption from a variety of communication areas.

The result is a collection of five peer-reviewed articles that demonstrate how digital video, gaming, blogging, and social networking can be used in innovative ways to enhance the learning experience in the communication classroom. The first two pieces both approach social media from a civic engagement perspective. While Jarvis and Han see these technologies, and especially digital filmmaking, as a way to combat youth disengagement and promote civic participation, Kuehn calls into question the very idea of a disengaged youth and instead argues that new media technologies such as YouTube may be re-defining popular conceptions of engagement and political identities by providing alternative means for civic participation. Both articles offer suggestions for using social media platforms to foster civic identities among communication majors.

Spielvogel and Ginsberg Spielvogel argue for the importance of speaking the language of a new breed of student, the digital native. Their article demonstrates how web-based role-playing simulations can illustrate core communication concepts and help students internalize notions of identity, context and culture. The authors maintain that for digital natives the immersion into a virtual world as part of the learning experience may be more beneficial than traditional types of print-based pedagogies.

Our fourth piece examines the pedagogical uses of blogging in undergraduate and graduate level communication courses. Departing from technologist Tim O’Reilly’s (2006) model for gauging levels of interactivity in Web 2.0 technologies, Platt provides a powerful theoretical framework for determining not only the effectiveness of her students’ blogging projects, but also the success of any number of social media classroom activities. To reap the full benefits of the social web, projects should be designed to reach O’Reilly’s third and highest level of social media technology use, Platt’s piece suggests.

Finally, Hu explores the social and educational benefits of using private Facebook groups to allow students to illustrate communication theories with digital videos, comment on them, and post discussion questions to the site’s discussion board. Her findings suggest that students outside the major may perceive more benefits from the activity and feel a greater sense of connection to their classmates than communication majors.

Taken together, the articles in this collection begin to paint a preliminary picture of the state of communication pedagogy only a few years into the social media revolution. It is our hope that this special issue will shed some light on how innovative communication educators are navigating the ever changing educational and media landscape and adapting their teaching. We would like to express our appreciation to Teri Harrison, who supported this special issue from the start, and to the entire editorial board who reviewed the numerous submissions and offered their thoughtful comments.

References

Facebook Statistics (n.d. ). Retrieved December 26, 2009, from http://www.facebook.com/press/info.php?statistics

Gigatweet: Counting the number of twitter messages (n.d. ). Retrieved December 26, 2009, from http://popacular.com/gigatweet/

O’Reilly, T. (2006, July 17). Levels of the game: The hierarchy of web 2.0 applications. Retrieved December 26, 2009, from http://radar.oreilly.com/archives/2006/07/levels-of-the-game.html

Prensky, M. (2001). Digital Natives, Digital Immigrants. On the Horizon, 9(5), 1-6.

Weigend, A. (2009, May 20). The Social Data Revolution(s). Retrieved December 26, 2009, from: http://blogs.harvardbusiness.org/now-new-next/2009/05/the-social-data-revolution.html


L’introduction des éditeurs:
La pédagogie de la communication dans l’âge du média social

Corinne Weisgerber & Shannan H. Butler
St. Edward’s University

Depuis quelques années, les innovations dans les technologies de la communication se sont multipliés et ont reçu un essor jamais vu qui sont en train de révolutionner non-seulement notre façon de communiquer mais aussi notre rapport entre nous-mêmes. Au moment de cette édition, les 350 million membres actifs de Facebook mettent plus de 55 millions de commentaires en ligne chaque jour et partage environ 3,5 milliards de pièces de contenu chaque semaine sous la forme de liens web, des nouvelles d’actualités, ou encore d’afficher des blogs (Facebook Statistics, n.d. ). Entre-temps, sur la plateforme populaire du micro-blogging qu’est Twitter, plus de 20 millions de tweets sont publiés chaque jour (Gigatweet, n.d. ). Ce que nous disent ces chiffres c’est que les gens se jettent sur Internet afin de mettre des photos en l igne, de partager des vidéos, de raconter des histoires, et tout simplement se connecter avec les uns et les autres. Ensemble, ils vont créer davantage de données en une année qu’a été générée dans toute l’histoire de la civilisation (Weigend, 2009).

De plusieurs façons, les changements que le nouveau média social technologique nous a rapportés sont si profonds qu’elles n’arrêtent pas à la porte de la classe. Elles imprègnent et s’étendent sur l’espace pédagogique. Et pourquoi ne devraient-elles pas ? Les étudiants qui sont enregistrés dans nos cours aujourd’hui comme autochtone numériques (Prensky, 2001) sont des individus qui ont grandi dans un environnement numériques et pour qui cela leur paraît être la norme. Leur monde est un monde d’ordinateurs, de consoles de jeu, de lecteurs MP3, et de téléphones multifonctions. Un monde où les SMART Board ont remplacé les tableaux noirs et les ordinateurs portables ont prit la place du papier et du stylo. Bien que les critiques voient des connections constantes offertes par ces no uvelles participations technologiques comme une distraction qui empêche un apprentissage efficace et résiste à l’idée d’intégrer ces technologies dans nos cours, il est difficile de nier que les blogs, les micro-blogs, les wikis, ainsi que les réseaux sociaux se transforment rapidement, sinon dans le cours même, au moins dans le milieu d’apprentissage dans lequel nos étudiants vivent.

Cette édition spéciale de la Revue électronique du journal de communication cherche à explorer comment les enseignants de la communication prennent avantages des opportunités pédagogiques offertes par des variétés de technologies médiatiques sociales. Cette édition a été conçue de l’idée puisque beaucoup de ces technologies sont concentrées autour des idées de collaboration, de participation, et de conversation, elles devraient tenir un intérêt particulier pour les chercheurs en communication et pour les éducateurs. Avec cette édition, nous avons voulu offrir un forum pour les éducateurs en communication afin d’examiner les applications pédagogiques des technologies médiatiques sociales et de présenter les meilleurs exemplaires pratiques de cette adoption technologie d’une vari été de domaines en communication.

Le résultat est une collection de cinq articles à comité de lecture qui démontrent la façon dont la vidéo numérique, les jeux, les bloggings et le réseau social peut être utilisé de manière innovatrice pour améliorer l’apprentissage dans les cours de communication. Les deux premiers articles abordent les médias sociaux à travers la perspective d’un engagement civique. Alors que Jarvis et Han voient ces technologies, et surtout la réalisation numérique, comme un moyen de lutter contre un détachement des jeunes et de promouvoir une participation civique, Kuehn remet en question l’idée d’une jeunesse désengagée et argumente que les nouvelles technologies médiatiques tel que YouTube peuvent être en train de redéfinir les conceptions populaires de l’engagement et des identités polit iques en offrant des suggestions pour une utilisation différente d’une participation civique. Les deux articles offrent des suggestions pour l’utilisation de plateformes médiatiques sociales afin d’encourager des identités civiques parmi ceux qui se spécialisent en communication.

Spielvogel et Ginsberg Spielvogel affirment l’importance de parler le langage d’une nouvelle race d’étudiants : l’autochtone numérique. Leur article explique comment l’application d’un outil de jeux de rôle de simulation démontre les concepts du centre de la communication et aide les étudiants à intérioriser les notions d’identités, le contexte, et la culture. Les auteurs maintiennent que pour les autochtones numériques, l’intégration dans un monde virtuel dans le cadre de l’expérience d’apprentissage peut être plus bénéfique que les pédagogies traditionnelles basées sur des livres.

Notre quatrième article examine les utilisations pédagogiques des blogs en premier cycle et dans les cours de communication des cours de maîtrise. Partant du modèle du technologue Tim O’Reilly (2006) pour évaluer les niveaux d’interactivité dans les technologies Web 2.0, Platt fournit un cadre théorique puissant pour déterminer non-seulement l’efficacité des projets de création de blogs de ses élèves, mais aussi le succès de n’importe quel nombre d’activités en classe de médias sociaux. Pour profiter pleinement de tous les avantages du web social comme le suggère Platt, les projets devraient être conçus de manière à atteindre le troisième et plus haut niveau de O’Reilly sur la technologie des médias sociaux à utiliser.

Enfin, Hu explore les avantages sociaux et éducatifs de l’utilisation de groupes privés de Facebook pour permettre aux étudiants d’illustrer des théories de la communication avec des vidéos numériques, faire des commentaires sur eux, et d’afficher des questions sur le site. Ses conclusions suggèrent que les étudiants à l’extérieur de leurs spécialisations peuvent percevoir plus d’avantages de l’activité et ressente une meilleur connexion avec leurs camarades de classe que ceux qui se spécialisent en communication.

Pris dans leur ensemble, les articles de cette collection commencent à peindre une image préliminaire de l’état de la pédagogie de communication seulement quelques années dans la révolution des médias sociaux. C’est notre espoir que cette édition spéciale va pouvoir éclairer la façon dont les éducateurs innovants de communication naviguent cette évolution constante du paysage médiatique et éducationnel et adaptent leur enseignement. Nous tenons à exprimer notre reconnaissance à Teri Harrison qui soutient cette édition spéciale depuis le début, et le conseil éditorial qui a examiné les nombreuses soumissions et qui ont offert leurs commentaires réfléchis.

Référence :

Facebook Statistics (n.d. ). Accédé le 26 Décembre 2009, de http://www.facebook.com/press/info.php?statistics

Gigatweet: Counting the number of twitter messages (n.d. ). Accédé le 26 Décembre 2009, de http://popacular.com/gigatweet/

O’Reilly, T. (2006, July 17). Levels of the game: The hierarchy of web 2.0 applications. Accédé le 26 Décembre 2009, de  http://radar.oreilly.com/archives/2006/07/levels-of-the-game.html

Prensky, M. (2001). Digital Natives, Digital Immigrants. On the Horizon, 9(5), 1-6.

Weigend, A. (2009, May 20). The Social Data Revolution(s). Accédé le 26 Décembre 2009, de : http://blogs.harvardbusiness.org/now-new-next/2009/05/the-social-data-revolution.html


Online/offline Communications Pedagogy:
YouTube and the Development of an Electronic Citizenry

Kathleen M. Kuehn
The Pennsylvania State University

Abstract. This paper challenges existing theories of youth disengagement and demonstrates some of the ways that new media technologies may be re-defining popular conceptions of civic engagement and political identities. Drawing from cultural displacement theorists this paper argues that social networking sites like YouTube are a more appealing venue for political and civic action and demonstrate that young people are engaging in new, non-traditional ways. This paper suggests that communications pedagogy must re-conceptualize the use of social media platforms in higher education in order to exploit the potential they hold for fostering civic identities through innovative and culturally relevant usage in and outside the classroom. The author suggests a number of practical ways that YouTube can be incorporated as a pedagogical tool in communications curriculum that addresses and promotes civic-building activities and experiences such as participatory cultural producti on, discursive participation, and building social trust.

Pédagogie de communications en ligne et hors ligne : YouTube et le développement d’une société électronique  : Cette étude défit les théories existantes du désengagement de la jeunesse et illustre certaines des manières dont les nouvelles technologies des médias peuvent redéfinir les conceptions populaires de l’engagement civique et des identités politiques. En se basant sur les théoriciens des déplacements culturels, cette étude fait l’argument que les sites de réseautage social comme YouTube sont des lieus plus attrayant pour l’action politique et civique et démontrent que les jeunes s’engagent dans des moyens nouveaux et non-traditionnels. Cette étude suggère que les communications pédagogiques doivent se remettre à conceptualiser l&rs quo;utilisation de plates-formes sociales médiatiques dans le domaine de l’enseignement supérieur afin d’exploiter le potentiel qu’ils détiennent pour favoriser les identités civiques par le biais de l’utilisation innovante et culturellement pertinente à l’intérieur et en dehors de la classe. L’auteur suggère un certain nombre de moyens pratiques que YouTube peut être incorporé comme un outil pédagogique dans les cursus de communications qui traitent et favorisent les activités qui renforcent le civisme et les expériences telles que la production culturelle participative, la participation discursive et la construction de la confiance sociale.


Communication and Civic Participation:
Promoting Engaged Citizenship through Digital Filmmaking

Sharon Jarvis and Soo-Hye Han
University of Texas at Austin

Abstract. At the dawn of the 21st century, universities face two important challenges: preparing students for democratic life and providing them with meaningful instruction in key emerging technologies. This article reports on a communication course that used digital filmmaking to encourage students to think critically about citizenship and civic participation. The following pages introduce the course, detail a two-semester review of it, and share how the filmmaking assignment allowed students to be creative, persuasive, and reflective about the role(s) of citizens in a democratic state.

Communication et participation civique : promouvoir la citoyenneté par l’intermédiaire de la réalisation de films numériques : A l’aube du XXIe siècle, les universités font face à deux défis importants : préparer les étudiants pour une vie démocratique et leur fournir des instructions significatives dans les technologies émergentes clé. Cet article indique une voie de communication qui utilise le cinéma numérique pour encourager les étudiants à réfléchir de façon critique à la citoyenneté et à la participation civique. Les pages suivantes introduisent le cours, détail une révision de celui-ci sur deux semestres, et partage comment ce devoir de création filmique a permis aux étudiants d’être créati f, convaincant, et pensif sur le rôle (s) des citoyens dans un état démocratique.


Speaking the Language of Digital Natives:
Role-playing Simulations in the Communication Classroom

Christian Spielvogel
Hope College

Laura Ginsberg Spielvogel
Western Michigan University

Abstract. In this essay we argue that the strategic use of social media technologies, as primary instructional resources, has the potential to be a more effective way to help students comprehend core tenants of human communication as compared to other resources rooted in print-based epistemologies. They examine how web-based role-playing simulations effectively empower students to experience, critique, and comprehend the impact of identity on communication, the centrality of context in the creation and interpretation of meaning, the effective modeling of communication processes, and a view of communication as systemic. Drawing upon examples from their recently developed Serious Sims, a federally funded platform for supporting anonymous online role-playing simulations in communication studies, they use the recently piloted Valley Sim and A Marriage of Cultures simulation prototypes, to illustrate best pra ctices for using social media technologies in the communication classroom. Additionally, they describe how students’ expanded subject positions or roles as performers, authors, and collaborators within role-playing simulations can greatly facilitate their understanding of these key axioms of human communication.

Parlant la langue des autochtones numérique : le rôle du jeu dans la communication en salle de classe : Dans cet essai, nous soutenons que l’utilisation stratégique des technologies de médias sociaux comme principale ressources pédagogiques a le potentiel d’être un moyen plus efficace pour aider les élèves à comprendre la base de la communication humaine par rapport aux autres ressources basées dans l’épistémologie de l’écrit. Ils examinent comment le jeu de rôle basé sur le web simule les étudiants de façon efficace afin de ressentir, de critiquer, et de comprendre l’impact de l’identité sur la communication, la centralité du contexte dans la création et l’interprétation des sens, la modélisation efficace du pr ocessus de communication et un mode de communication systémique. En s’inspirant des exemples tirés par le « Serious Sims », qui est une plateforme récemment développés et financée par le gouvernement fédéral américain pour la prise en charge des simulations de rôle en ligne anonyme dans les études de communication, ils utilisent les prototypes récemment essayés comme le « Valley Sim » et le « A Marriage of Cultures » afin d’illustrer les meilleures pratiques pour l’utilisation des technologies des médias sociaux dans la classe de communication. En outre, ils décrivent comment les positions des sujets développés par les étudiants où leurs rôles comme interprètes, auteurs, et collaborateurs dans les simulations de rôle peuvent grandement faciliter leur compréhension de ces clés axiomes de la communication humaine.


Writing in Public:
Pedagogical Uses of Blogging in the Communication Course

Carrie Anne Platt
North Dakota State University

Abstract. This paper explores the value of blogging in both undergraduate and graduate level communication courses. Using three different courses at an upper Midwest public university as case studies, it addresses both the positive and negative outcomes that can result from incorporating blogging into the communication curriculum. As the case studies presented will illustrate, “writing in public” has the potential to increase student engagement, improve the quality of student writing, facilitate peer-to-peer learning, make the connection between theory and practice more concrete, and help students develop necessary levels of multi-media literacy. After considering the pedagogical outcomes of blogging in these communication courses, along with student feedback on their own blogging experiences, the paper concludes by outlining a set of best practices for the educational use of this social media technology.

Ecrire en public : l’utilisation pédagogique de blogs dans les cours de communication : Cette étude explore la valeur des blogs en premier cycle et dans les cours de communication au niveau diplômé. En utilisant trois cours différents dans une université publique du Midwest comme étude de cas, cela adressera autant les résultats positifs et négatifs qui peuvent découler de cette étude en incorporant un blog dans les programmes de communication. Comme les études de cas présentées illustrerons de façon nette, « écrire en public » a le potentiel d’accroître l’engagement de l’étudiant, d’améliorer la qualité de son écriture, faciliter l’apprentissage entre gens, faire le lien entre la théorie et la pratique plus concrète, et aider les étudiants à développer les niveaux nécessaires de l’alphabétisation des multimédias. Après avoir vu les résultats pédagogiques des blogs dans ces trois cours de communication, ainsi que les commentaires des étudiants de leurs propres expériences sur les blogs, cette étude conclut en décrivant un ensemble des meilleures pratiques pour l’utilisation de cette technologie des médias sociaux éducatifs.


Creating a Learning Community:
Social and Educational Benefits of using Facebook in a Mixed-major College Classroom

Yifeng Hu
The College of New Jersey

Abstract. Students in four sections of a communication class experimented with private Facebook groups to assist their learning. Both quantitative and qualitative methods were used to assess students’ perceptions of using Facebook in the class. A survey (N = 80) showed that overall, students had a fairly positive attitude towards supplementing the class with Facebook. The social benefits of Facebook use were positively correlated to its educational benefits, suggesting the importance of social aspects of classroom learning. The value of the social advantages derived from using Facebook in education is further displayed by the significant role students’ academic majors played in their perceptions. Non-communications majors enjoyed using Facebook more than communications majors, perceived it to be more of a beneficial educational tool than did majors, and thought their classmates knew them better because of the Facebook group. The qua litative data reinforced the quantitative evidence of students’ positive perceptions of using Facebook in class. These findings imply that due to its unique social functions, Facebook can create a community that may be beneficial to classroom learning.

Création d’une communauté d’apprentissage : avantages sociaux et les bénéfices d’utiliser Facebook dans une classe mixte d’université : Des étudiants en quatre sections d’une classe de communication ont expérimenté avec des groupes privés de Facebook pour aider leur apprentissage. Des méthodes quantitatives et qualitatives ont été utilisées pour évaluer les perceptions des élèves à l’utilisation de Facebook dans la classe. Un sondage (N = 80) a montré que les étudiants ont une attitude assez positive quand la classe était supplémentée par Facebook. Les avantages sociaux par l’utilisation de Facebook étaient en corrélation positive à ses avantages éducatifs suggérant l’importance des aspect s sociaux de l’apprentissage en classe. La valeur des avantages sociaux provenant de l’utilisation de Facebook dans le domaine de l’éducation est affichée par le rôle important qu’à jouer la perception des étudiants dans leurs spécialisations universitaires. Les étudiants n’ayant pas de spécialisations ont préféré utiliser Facebook car ils ont pensé que c’était un outil éducatif bien plus bénéfique et ils pensaient que leurs camarades de classe les connaissaient mieux grâce au groupe dans Facebook. Les données qualitatives ont renforcé la preuve quantitative des perceptions positives des élèves d’utiliser Facebook en classe. Ces conclusions impliquent que, en raison de ses fonctions sociales uniques, Facebook peut créer une communauté qui peut être bénéfique à l ’apprentissage en classe.


On the Binding Biases of Time:
Korzybski, Innis, and the Future of the Present

Lance Strate
Fordham University

Abstract. This essay is based on a keynote address presented at the 67th Annual Conference of the New York State Communication Association, Ellenville, NY, October 23-25, 2009. We sometimes think of time as having recurring cycles like the seasons, or as having a forward motion, progressing into a better future. Korzybski brought forward the idea of humans as being time-binding. Innis, in his study of oral and written traditions and their effects on us, explored the values conveyed by oral traditions. If we teach the origin of language and symbolic communication, and use those teachings to help plan for a constructed and coherent future, we can help restore balance lost in the high focus on “the now” that our technological age so admires.

Sur les préjugés du temps : Korzybski, Innis et l’avenir du present  :  Cet essai est basé sur un discours présenté au 67e Congrès annuel de l’Association de communication de l’état de New York à Ellenville (NY) ayant eu lieu du 23 au 25 octobre 2009. Nous pensons parfois au temps comme ayant des cycles périodiques comme les saisons, ou d’avoir un mouvement nous poussant vers l’avant, de progresser vers un avenir meilleur. Korzybski a avancé l’idée de l’homme comme étant une liaison du temps. Innis, dans son étude des traditions orales et écrites et de leurs effets sur nous, a exploré les valeurs portées par les traditions orales. Si nous enseignons l’origine de la langue et de la communication symbolique et que nous utilisons ces enseignements pour nous aider à planifier un future construit et cohérent, nous pouvons aider à rétablir l’équilibre perdu dans ce focus du «m aintenant» que notre ère technologique admire tant.


Copyright 2010 Communication Institute for Online Scholarship, Inc.

This file may not be publicly distributed or reproduced without written permission of the Communication Institute for Online Scholarship,

P.O. Box 57, Rotterdam Jct. , NY 12150 USA (phone: 518-887-2443).