Communication Institute for Online Scholarship
Communication Institute for Online
Scholarship Continous online service and innovation
since 1986
Site index
 
ComAbstracts Visual Communication Concept Explorer Tables of Contents Electronic Journal of Communication ComVista

EJC 20(3 & 4): The Internet in China / L’internet en Chine
Electronic Journal of Communication

Volume 20 Numbers 3 & 4, 2010

The Internet in China and Chinese Society /
L’internet en Chine et la société chinoise

With Special Editors / Avec éditeurs spéciales :

Randy Kluver
Texas A&M University
College Station, Texas, USA
and
Teresa Harrison
University at Albany
Albany, New York, USA

Editor’s Introduction / L’introduction d’éditeur

Randy Kluver
Texas A&M University
College Station, Texas, USA

Chinese cyberspaces: Defining the spatial component of a “borderless” media / Les cyberspaces chinois : définir la composante spatiale du média « sans frontières »

Jens Damm
Chang Jung Christian University
Tainan, Taiwan, R.O.C.

How to behave yourself on the net: Ethical limits of public communication in China / Comment vous comportez sur le net : limites éthiques de communication publique en Chine

K. Giese
GIGA Institute of Asian Studies
Hamburg, Germany

C. Mueller
Bremen University of Applied Sciences
Breman, Germany

Internet software piracy in China: Technology, culture and patriotism / Piratage de logiciel internet en Chine : technologie, culture et patriotisme

Jia Lu
Tsinghua University
Beijing, China

Authoritarian deliberation on Chinese Internet / Délibérations sur l’autoritarisme dans l’internet chinois

Min Jiang
University of North Carolina at Charlotte
Charlotte, North Carolina, USA


Independent Research Paper

Voice to the people: Media users’ perspectives on selective exposure and avoidance / La voix pour le peuple : perspectives des usagers des médias sur l’exposition sélective et de prévention

Magdalena E. Wojcieszak
IE University
Segovia, Spain


EJC Book Review

Review of Working Class Network Society by Jack Linchuan Qiu, MIT Press, 2009 / Revue de Working Class Network Society par Jack Linchuan Qiu, MIT Press, 2009

Raul Pertierra
University of the Philippines
Diliman, Quezon City, Philippines


Introduction:
The Internet in China and Chinese Society

Randy Kluver
Texas A&M University
College Station, Texas, USA

As of the fall of 2010, stories of China’s “rise” have become standard fare for news outlets of all stripes, including business, political, cultural, and academic. The astounding economic growth of the past two and a half decades, plus the corresponding strength of China’s business and political elites has precipitated a new way of conceptualizing China’s role in the future. At the same time, the stubborn refusal to adopt political reforms along the lines anticipated by Western observers means that enthusiasm for China’s rise is mitigated by a deep distrust of future antagonism from China.

These same themes have been largely repeated by scholars interested in the role of the Internet in Chinese society. In an analysis of academic literature covering China’s internet up to 2005, we found that a great majority of the published research on China’s Internet sought to answer only two questions: Is it possible for China to build an extensive national network, given its relatively poor telecommunications infrastructure? Further, can China control the Internet? (Kluver et Chen, 2005). The overwhelming emphasis on issues of development and political control means that the relationship of information technologies to larger social and cultural developments in China remain largely overlooked.

The questions could not be more relevant. In the summer of 2010, the Chinese Internet Network Information Center announced that the nation’s population of Internet users had increased to 420 million, well above the numbers of any other nation (CNNIC, 2010). In fact, China’s Internet population is now larger than any nation in the world, with the exception of China itself and India. By comparison, the US has approximately 230 million, and Japan somewhere around 99 million. No other nation has over 100 million users (Internetworldstats, 2010). Moreover, there is a maturation of the Internet experience in China, with almost 90% of users accessing the net from home, and the user base is expanding significantly. The age of the “average Internet user” is increasing, while the relative educational level is decreasing, demonstrating that the Internet has grown far beyond its initial base of coll ege and university students.

The implications of this should be fairly obvious. Regardless of its origins, the Internet has become a Chinese phenomenon, with China contributing over 20% of the overall user base. If Internet users level out similarly to that of the US and other developed nations, at about 80% of a nation’s citizens, then China’s user base will contain over a billion people. Due to the way in which national, cultural, and language differences can be hidden within the Internet architecture, this radical reconfiguration of the Internet has been largely invisible to many in the West, but prefigures profound changes not just to China, but potentially to the Internet itself.

The papers in this special issue help to illuminate some aspects of the “sinicization” of the Internet, illuminating both the question of how these information technologies are contributing to the transformation of China, but also how China is contributing to the Internet. These papers help to document the scope and depth of these changes in an effort to better understand the Chinese information technology revolution and its consequences. All of these papers call attention to the ways in which Chinese netizens both appropriate and re-negotiate the “terms of engagement” with information technologies in Chinese society.

Jens Damm’s important essay, for example, interrogates the very question of the boundaries of Chinese cyberspace, and argues that there are multiple locations and manners in which offline “Chinese” culture is constituted, and challenges us to consider the existence of several distinct “Chinese cyberspaces,” and multiple origins and outgrowths of Chinese culture.

Likewise, the article by Karsten Giese and Constanze Mueller examines the familiar terrain of political discourse online, but probes Chinese netizens’ understandings of appropriate behavior. Giese and Mueller’s paper goes far beyond a simplistic control/dissent framework, and repositions China’s online speech limitations as a function not just of political control, but also as a negotiated framework that draws upon ethical, political, and cultural values of the netizens themselves.

Lu Jia’s essay examines how attitudes of Chinese users of imported software challenge the “piracy” framework that is deftly applied by developers of software, and argues that to an influential segment of Chinese society, piracy is a western construct, and needs to be renegotiated to consider the priorities of developing nations.

Finally, Min Jiang’s paper looks directly at political discourse online, and lays out a topography for political space based upon central government control, but argues that ultimately, the government still dictates terms for political engagement, and questions the long-term viability of the Internet as a space for political discourse in China.

In conclusion, I am very grateful to Teri Harrison, who worked with me for well over two years to produce this issue of The Electronic Journal of Communication and allow us to feature a broader examination of China’s Internet. Thanks as well to the reviewers of these papers:

Joel Bloom, University at Albany
Matthew Chew, Hong Kong Baptist University
Jens Damm,  Chang Jung Christian University
Lincoln Dahlberg, University of Queensland
Jens Damm,  Chang Jung Christian University
Ashley Esarey, Middlebury College
Anthony Fung, Chinese University of Hong Kong
Kelly Garrett, Ohio State University
Alex Golub, University of Hawaii
Teresa M. Harrison, University at Albany
William Husson, University at Albany
Nicholas Jankowski, University of Nijmegen
Peng Hwa Ang,  Nanyang Technological University
Randy Kluver, Texas A & M University
Eddie C. Y. Kuo, Nanyang Technological University
Ethan Liebe, Hastings College of Law, University of California
Ming Liu, University at Albany
John Logie, University of Minnesota
Joyce Nip, Hong Kong Baptist University
John H. Powers, Hong Kong Baptist University
Jack Linchuan Qiu, Chinese University of Hong Kong
Todd Sandel, University of Oklahoma
James Watt, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute
Tamara Witschge, Goldsmiths, University of London
Xu Wu, Arizona State University
Guobin Yang, Columbia University
Peter K. Yu, Drake University
Qin Zhang, Fairfield University
Yingfan Zhang, Suffolk County Community College
Xiang Zhou, Shantou University

References

China Internet Network Information Center (CNNIC) (2010, July). The 26th Statistical Report on Internet Development in China. Retrieved from http://www.cnnic.cn/uploadfiles/pdf/2010/8/24/93145.pdf

Internet World Stats (2010). Top 20 countries with the highest number of internet users. Retrieved from http://www.internetworldstats.com/top20.htm (accessed September 29, 2010).

Kluver, R. and Y. Chen, (2005). The Internet in China: A Meta-Review of Research. The Information Society, 21, 301-308.


Introduction : L’internet en Chine et la société chinoise

Randy Kluver
Texas A&M University
College Station, Texas, USA

Depuis l’automne 2010, des histoires sur la montée de la Chine sont devenus omniprésent pour les organismes d’information de tout acabit, y compris les entreprises, la politique, la culture et les centres universitaires. L’étonnante croissance économique des 25 dernières années, plus la résistance correspondante des entreprises et des élites politiques chinoise a précipité une nouvelle façon de conceptualisation son rôle dans l’avenir. Dans le même temps, le refus obstiné à adopter des réformes politiques le long des lignes anticipées par les observateurs occidentaux signifie que l’enthousiasme pour la montée de la Chine est atténué par une profonde méfiance à l’égard de l’antagonisme futur de la Chine.

Ces mêmes thèmes ont été répétés en grande partie par les universitaires intéressés dans le rôle de l’internet dans la société chinoise. Dans une analyse de littérature académique couvrant l’internet en Chine jusqu’en 2005, nous avons constaté qu’une grande majorité de recherches publiées sur internet en Chine n’a cherché à répondre qu’à deux questions : est-ce possible pour la Chine de construire un vaste réseau national compte tenu de son infrastructure de télécommunication relativement pauvre ? De plus, est-ce que la Chine peut contrôler l’internet ? (Kluver et Chen, 2005). L’emphase se porte sur les questions de développement et les moyens de contrôle politique que la relation entre les technolo gies de l’information aux grandes évolutions sociales et culturelles en Chine reste largement négligée.

Les questions ne peuvent pas être plus pertinentes. Pendant l’été 2010, le Centre du Réseau Internet d’Information Chinois a annoncé que la population du pays utilisateurs d’internet a augmenté de 420 millions de gens, bien au-dessus du nombre de tout autre pays (CNNIC, 2010). En fait, la population internet chinoise est maintenant plus importante que toute autre nation dans le monde, à l’exception de la Chine elle-même et de l’Inde. Par comparaison, les États-Unis ont environ 230 millions et le Japon autour de 99 millions d’utilisateurs internet. Aucune autre nation n’a plus de 100 millions d’utilisateurs (Internetworldstats, 2010). En outre, il y a une maturation de l’expérience internet en Chine, avec près de 90 % des utilisateurs qui accède à l’internet de la maison, et cette base d’utilisateur est en grande expansion. L’âge de « l’utilisateur moyen de l’internet » a augmenté, tandis que le niveau d’instruction relatif diminue, ce qui démontre que l’internet a augmenté bien au-delà de sa base initiale des étudiants collégiaux et universitaires.

Les implications devraient être assez évidentes. Indépendamment de ses origines, l’internet est devenu un phénomène chinois, avec une Chine qui contribue plus de 20 % d’utilisateur sur une base globale. Si le nombre d’internautes arrive au même niveau qu’à celui des États-Unis et des autres pays développés, soit environ 80 % des citoyens d’un pays, le nombre d’utilisateur en Chine aura plus d’un milliard de personnes. En raison de la façon dont les différences national, culturel, et la linguistique peuvent être masquées dans l’architecture de l’internet, cette reconfiguration radicale de l’internet a été largement invisible pour beaucoup de gens dans l’Ouest, mais préfigure des changements profonds non seulement en Chine, mais potentiellement à l’intérieur même de l& rsquo;internet.

Les articles dans cette édition spéciale éclairent certains aspects de la « sinisation » de l’internet, en éclairant la question de la façon dont ces technologies de l’information contribue à la transformation de la Chine, mais aussi comment la Chine contribue à l’internet. Ces articles aident à documenter la portée et la profondeur de ces changements dans le but de mieux comprendre la révolution des technologies d’informations chinoise et ses conséquences. Tous ces articles attirent l’attention sur les façons dont les internautes chinois s’approprient et renégocient les « conditions d’engagement » avec les technologies de l’information dans la société chinoise.

L’essai important de Jens Damm interroge la même question sur les limites du cyberespace chinois et fait valoir qu’il existe plusieurs endroits et façons dans lesquelles les connexions autonomes culturelles «  chinoises » sont constituées et nous défis de considérer l’existence de plusieurs «  cyberspaces chinois » distincts ainsi que des origines multiples et des excroissances de la culture chinoise.

De même, l’article de Karsten Giese et Constanze Mueller examine le terrain familier du discours politique en ligne, mais enquête sur la compréhension des internautes chinois sur le comportement approprié. L’article de Giese et Mueller va bien au-delà d’un cadre de contrôle/dissidence simpliste et repositionne les limitations du discours chinois en ligne en fonction non seulement du contrôle politique, mais aussi dans un cadre négocié qui s’inspire des valeurs éthiques, politiques et culturelles des internautes.

L’essai de Jia Lu examine comment les attitudes des utilisateurs chinois de logiciels importés contestent le cadre de la « piraterie » qui est habilement appliqué par les développeurs de logiciels et soutient que pour un segment influent de la société chinoise, le piratage est un concept de l’Ouest et doit être renégocié pour examiner les priorités des pays en développement.

Enfin, l’essai de Min Jiang regarde directement les discours politiques en ligne et établit une topographie sur l’espace politique basée sur le contrôle du gouvernement central, mais fait valoir qu’en fin de compte, le gouvernement dicte encore les modalités de l’engagement politique et remet en question la viabilité à long terme de l’internet comme un espace pour un discours politique en Chine.

En conclusion, je suis très reconnaissant à Teri Harrison, qui a travaillé avec moi depuis plus de deux ans à créer cette édition de la revue électronique de communication qui nous permet un examen plus important sur l’internet en Chine. Merci aussi aux critiques de ces essais:

Joel Bloom, University at Albany
Matthew Chew, Hong Kong Baptist University
Jens Damm,  Chang Jung Christian University
Lincoln Dahlberg, University of Queensland
Jens Damm,  Chang Jung Christian University
Ashley Esarey, Middlebury College
Anthony Fung, Chinese University of Hong Kong
Kelly Garrett, Ohio State University
Alex Golub, University of Hawaii
Teresa M. Harrison, University at Albany
William Husson, University at Albany
Nicholas Jankowski, University of Nijmegen
Peng Hwa Ang,  Nanyang Technological University
Randy Kluver, Texas A & M University
Eddie C. Y. Kuo, Nanyang Technological University
Ethan Liebe, Hastings College of Law, University of California
Ming Liu, University at Albany
John Logie, University of Minnesota
Joyce Nip, Hong Kong Baptist University
John H. Powers, Hong Kong Baptist University
Jack Linchuan Qiu, Chinese University of Hong Kong
Todd Sandel, University of Oklahoma
James Watt, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute
Tamara Witschge, Goldsmiths, University of London
Xu Wu, Arizona State University
Guobin Yang, Columbia University
Peter K. Yu, Drake University
Qin Zhang, Fairfield University
Yingfan Zhang, Suffolk County Community College
Xiang Zhou, Shantou University

Référence :

China Internet Network Information Center (CNNIC) (2010, July). The 26th Statistical Report on Internet Development in China. Retrieved from http://www.cnnic.cn/uploadfiles/pdf/2010/8/24/93145.pdf

Internet World Stats (2010). Top 20 countries with the highest number of internet users. Retrieved from http://www.internetworldstats.com/top20.htm (accessed September 29, 2010).

Kluver, R. and Y. Chen, (2005). The Internet in China: A Meta-Review of Research. The Information Society, 21, 301-308.


Chinese cyberspaces:
Defining the spatial component of a “borderless” media

Jens Damm
Chang Jung Christian University
Tainan, Taiwan, R.O.C
.

Abstract. Can a common “Chinese cyberspace” be defined in terms of language, culture and policy, or would it be more appropriate to speak of several distinct “Chinese cyberspaces”? And in what way can the relation between offline local entities and the cyberspaces be described? This paper highlights the fragmentation and/or commonalities of Chinese cyberspace(s) through a detailed analysis of websites which are particularly involved in constructing or deconstructing Chineseness belonging to “Greater China.” “Chinese cyberspace(s)” will refer to cyberspaces which are either defined by language, or by content, or by the political dimension. The author concludes that the actual existence of a common language presents the most obvious argument for the existence of a Chinese cyberspace. This is, however, counteracted by technical limitations, by laws, in particular by the PRC, and by cultural boundaries all of w hich restrict Chinese cyberspaces very much to specific political entities. Thus, these cyberspaces are characterized by various types of constraints. Finally, elements of transnationalism, cosmopolitanism and hybridity are tightly restricted by issues related to Taiwan’s nation-building.

Les cyberspaces chinois : définir la composante spatiale du média « sans frontières »  : Est-ce qu’un « cyberespace chinois » commun peut être défini en termes de langue, de culture et de politique, ou serait-il plus approprié de parler de plusieurs «  cyberespaces chinois » distincts? Et de quelle façon est-ce que la relation entre les entités locales hors ligne et les cyberespaces chinois peuvent être décrite ? Ce document met en évidence la fragmentation et/ou les points communs des cyberespaces chinois grâce à une analyse détaillée des sites Web qui sont particulièrement impliqués dans la construction ou la déconstruction de l’expérience chinoise. Le « cyberspace(s) chinois &raq uo; se réfère soit aux cyberespaces qui sont définies par la langue, soit par le contenu ou bien par la dimension politique. L’auteur conclut que l’existence réelle d’un langage commun présente l’argument le plus évident pour l’existence d’un cyberespace chinois. Il est, malgré tout, neutralisé par les limitations techniques et par les lois, en particulier par celles de la République populaire de Chine, et des frontières culturelles existantes qui limitent les cyberespaces chinois à des entités politiques spécifiques. Ainsi, ces cyberespaces sont caractérisés par divers types de contraintes et par des éléments de trans-nationalisme, de cosmopolitisme et les hybridités sont étroitement limitées par les questions liées à l’édification de Taïwan.


How to behave yourself on the net:
Ethical limits of public communication in China

K. Giese
GIGA Institute of Asian Studies
Hamburg, Germany
and
C. Mueller
Bremen University of Applied Sciences
Breman, Germany

Abstract. Western discourses on the Chinese Internet are often dominated by the narrow perspective of criticizing politically motivated censorship and persecution. Public discourse in China on the possibilities and limitations of individual freedom of speech in weblogs, however, show that this understanding does not necessarily fully correspond with the social and political reality as perceived by the Chinese themselves. In this article the authors explore recent Chinese discussions on regulating free speech online, which address the need to safeguard personal rights and ethical standards rather than political considerations and state censorship. Based on the media coverage of a case of defamation in a weblog, the authors conclude that Chinese public opinion as mirrored by state-sponsored online media clearly favours free speech with self-restraint based on common ethical norms and self-regulation. Although no clear understanding of these norms seems to exist yet, both unrestrained expression and censorship are disapproved. The state is called upon for assistance in ethical education and cautious control only if self-regulation fails.

Comment vous comportez sur le net : limites éthiques de communication publique en Chine : Les discours de l’Ouest sur l’internet chinois sont souvent dominés par la perspective étroite de critiquer la motivation politique de censure et de persécution. Les discours public en Chine sur les possibilités et les limites de la liberté individuelle de parole dans les blogs montrent, cependant, que cette compréhension ne correspond pas nécessairement à la réalité sociale et politique comme perçue par les Chinois eux-mêmes. Dans cet article, les auteurs explorent de récentes discussions chinoises sur la liberté d’expression en ligne qui répondent à la nécessité de protéger les droits personnels et les normes éthiques plutôt que de consid&eacut e;rations politiques et de censure par l’État. S‘inspirant de la couverture médiatique d’un cas de diffamation dans un blog, les auteurs concluent que l’opinion publique chinoise reflétée dans les médias en ligne sponsorisés par l’Etat favorise clairement la liberté d’expression avec une retenue fondée sur des normes éthiques communes et d’autorégulation. Bien qu‘aucune compréhension claire de ces normes ne semble encore exister, les expressions effrénées et de censures sont désapprouvées. L’Etat est appelé en aide dans l’éducation éthique et dans le contrôle prudent au cas où l’autorégulation échoue.


Internet software piracy in China: Technology, culture and patriotism

Jia Lu
Tsinghua University
Beijing, China

Abstract. This article adopts actor-network theory to explore the impacts of non-human and non-material factors on Chinese software users’ perceptions about software copyright and piracy. Technology, Chinese culture and patriotism are found to moderate the conflicting discourses between globalization and anti-globalization concerning the issues of software copyright and piracy. Through the mechanism of translation, technology, Chinese culture and patriotism enable software users to establish some degree of commonality among competing goals of global and local factors, and to develop a creative solution, namely, Internet software piracy. Internet software piracy represents a flexible, discriminative position to make a series of distinctions between offline purchasing of pirated software and Internet piracy, between enterprise users and individual users, and between foreign and local software companies. These distinctions consist of an integrated app roach to add the middle part and linkage to a dichotomized attention to the macro/global/production and the micro/local/reception aspects in the issues of software copyright and piracy.

Piratage de logiciel internet en Chine : technologie, culture et patriotisme :  Cet article adopte la théorie du réseau acteur d’étudier l’impact des facteurs non humains et non matériels sur les perceptions des utilisateurs de logiciels chinois sur le copyright du logiciel et du piratage. La technologie, la culture chinoise et le patriotisme se trouvent à modérer les discours contradictoires entre la mondialisation et l’antimondialisation entourant les questions des droit d’auteur des logiciels et du piratage. A travers le mécanisme de la traduction, de la technologie, la culture chinoise et le patriotisme permettent aux utilisateurs de logiciel d’établir une certaine compatibilité entre concurrentes des directions et des cibles de facteurs globaux et locaux et développent une seule et même solution cr&eacut e;ative qui est le piratage de logiciels internet. Ce piratage représente une position flexible de discrimination qui fait une série de distinctions entre le piratage d’achat hors ligne et de la piraterie sur internet, entre l’entreprise et les utilisateurs individuels et entre éditeurs étrangers et locaux.

Ces distinctions se composent d’une approche intégrée pour ajouter la partie centrale et la liaison à une dichotomie entre la macro de production globale et les aspects de la micro de réception local dans les questions de droit d’auteur des logiciels et du piratage.

Authoritarian deliberation on Chinese Internet

Min Jiang
Western Michigan University
Kalamazoo, Michigan, USA

Abstract. Modern authoritarianism relies on a combination of patriotism and legitimacy based on performance rather than ideology. As such, a modern authoritarian government has to allow for some forms of political discussion and participation from which popular consent to authoritarian rule is derived. With 335 million Internet users, 182 million bloggers, and 155 million netizens able to access the Internet through their mobile phones (CNNIC, 2009b), China presents an interesting case to examine public deliberation online. Adapting the concept of authoritarian deliberation (He, 2006a) from an offline environment to an online one, this article proposes four types of online spaces of authoritarian deliberation extending from the core to the peripheries of authoritarian rule: central propaganda spaces, government-regulated commercial spaces, emergent civic spaces, and international deliberative spaces. The p aper discusses their characteristics and implications for political participation in China and argues that democracy need not be a precursor to public deliberation. Instead, public deliberation may flourish as a viable alternative to the radical electoral democracy in authoritarian countries like China.

Délibérations sur l’autoritarisme dans l’internet chinois : L’autoritarisme moderne repose sur une combinaison de patriotisme et de légitimité basé sur les performances plutôt que sur l’idéologie. Comme tel, un gouvernement autoritaire moderne doit permettre certaines formes de débat politique et la participation dont est issu le consentement populaire face au pouvoir autoritaire. Avec 335 millions d’internautes, 182 millions de blogueurs et 155 millions de citoyens ayant accès à l’internet par le biais de leurs téléphones mobiles (CNNIC, 2009b), la Chine présente un cas intéressant pour examiner la délibération publique en ligne. Adapter le concept de délibération autoritaire (He, 2006a) dans un environne ment hors ligne pour un en ligne, l’article propose quatre types d’espaces en ligne de délibération autoritaire s’étendant du centre aux périphéries du pouvoir autoritaire : les espaces de propagande centrale, les espaces commerciaux réglementés par le gouvernement, les espaces civiques émergents et les espaces délibératifs internationaux. Cet article décrit leurs caractéristiques et leurs implications pour la participation politique en Chine et soutient que la démocratie n’a pas besoin d’être un précurseur pour la délibération publique. Au lieu de cela, la délibération publique peut prospérer comme une alternative viable à la démocratie électorale radicale dans des pays autoritaires comme la Chine.

References

China Internet Network Information Center (CNNIC). (2009b). 24th Statistical Survey Report on the Internet Development in China. Retrieved August 1, 2009 http://research.cnnic.cn/img/h000/h11/attach200907161306340.pdf

He, B. (2006a). Western theories of deliberative democracy and the Chinese practice of complex deliberative governance. In E. Leib & B. He (Eds.), The search for deliberation democracy in China (pp. 133-148). New York: Palgrave MacMillan.


Voice to the people: Media users’ perspectives on selective exposure and avoidance

Magdalena E. Wojcieszak
IE University
Segovia, Spain

Abstract. This study puts people back into the scholarship on selective exposure and selective avoidance, asking young activists from on-campus partisan organizations about their experiences related to media use. Drawing on in-depth interviews, the study offers some noteworthy findings. It differentiates between motivated exposure to alternative sources and selectivity with mainstream media and shows that the latter depends on who categorizes an outlet’s ideology. The study also finds that motivations behind selectivity may extend beyond comfort seeking, reveals the role that interest strength and specialization play in the process and demonstrates that although partisans do not avoid opposing outlets, their motivations for cross-cutting exposure may disappoint deliberative theorists. Practical and theoretical implications are discussed.

La voix pour le peuple : perspectives des usagers des médias sur l’exposition sélective et de prévention : Cette étude met les gens de retour dans la bourse d’études sur l’exposition sélective et la prévention sélective, demandant à de jeunes militants d’organisations partisanes sur le campus de leurs expériences liées à l’utilisation des médias. En s’appuyant sur des entretiens approfondis, l’étude offre quelques résultats dignes de mention. Elle se différencie entre l’exposition motivée à d’autres sources et de la sélectivité avec les médias traditionnels et montre que ceux-ci dépendent de qui catégorise l’idéologie du débouché. L’étude conclut aussi que l es motivations derrière la sélectivité peuvent s’étendre au-delà du confort cherchant, révèle le rôle que force d’intérêt et de spécialisation jouent dans le processus et montre que, bien que les partisans n’évitent pas des points de vues différents, leurs motivations pour l’exposition transversales peuvent décevoir des théoriciens délibératifs. Des implications pratiques et théoriques sont aussi discutées.


Copyright 2010 Communication Institute for Online Scholarship, Inc.

This file may not be publicly distributed or reproduced without written permission of
the Communication Institute for Online Scholarship,
P.O. Box 57, Rotterdam Jct., NY 12150 USA (phone: 518-887-2443).