Communication Institute for Online Scholarship
Communication Institute for Online
Scholarship Continous online service and innovation
since 1986
Site index
 
ComAbstracts Visual Communication Concept Explorer Tables of Contents Electronic Journal of Communication ComVista

EJC 20(3 & 4): The Internet in China / L’internet en Chine
Electronic Journal of Communication

Volume 21 Numbers 1 & 2, 2011

Social Media in News Discourse / Les médias sociaux dans les discours des nouvelles

With Editor / Avec éditeur :

Donald Matheson
University of Canterbury | Te Whare Wānanga o Waitaha
Christchurch, New Zealand | Aotearoa

Editor’s Introduction / L’introduction de l’éditeur

Donald Matheson
University of Canterbury | Te Whare Wānanga o Waitaha
Christchurch, New Zealand | Aotearoa

Journalists, social media, and the use of humor on Twitter / Les journalistes, les médias sociaux et l’utilisation de l’humour sur Twitter

Avery E. Holton
University of Texas
Austin, Texas, USA

Seth C. Lewis
University of Minnesota–Twin Cities
Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

The field of networked journalism / Le domaine du journalisme en réseau

Lou Rutigliano
DePaul University
Chicago, Illinois, USA


EJC Research Article

Watching Oprah in Kuwait: A qualitative and quantitative investigation / Regarder Oprah au Koweït : une enquête qualitative et quantitative

Shaheed Nick Mohammed
Penn State Altoona
Altoona, Pennsylvania, USA

Mary Queen
American University of Kuwait
Salmiya, Kuwait


Introduction:
Social Media in News Discourse

Donald Matheson
University of Canterbury | Te Whare Wānanga o Waitaha
Christchurch, New Zealand
| Aotearoa

Analysis of emergent media tends to operate within dichotomies. There is old journalism, and there is new journalism. There is the citizen, and there is the institutional or professional. These and similar sets of terms are useful heuristics in identifying what is at stake in change to longstanding media practices and audience relationships. But, as this special issue on the relationship between social media and journalism shows, there is no such stable set of formations in actual practice.

In fact, the contingency of all these categories is the finding that unites all these studies. This is true whether one is looking at Latvia, the US or New Zealand. As soon as, for example,  the US’s National Public Radio begins offering its fans on Facebook virtual ‘gifts’ featuring its branding to send to their friends, its relationship with users changes in ways that are multiple and difficult to trace. As Shawn Day shows, some NPR Facebook fans are comfortable with this kind of opportunity to display their fandom, while others reject it as not matching the relationship they want with a public service broadcaster or how they want to use Facebook. NPR, at the time of the study moving close to the million mark in its fan base on the platform, is clearly successful in many ways in establishing itself within people’s social worlds. Yet those fans are quite publicly involved, on a daily basis, in working through what that fandom entails. Wha t it means to be a news organisation in social media is to be involved in multiple and changing relationships with people.

Similarly, Bronwyn Beatty shows significant tensions within Television New Zealand’s use of citizen contributions in a professionally-produced political leaders’ debate. In what it claimed was a world-first experiment, TVNZ teamed up with YouTube to solicit questions to be put to party leaders, wrapping the endeavour in a discourse of democratic renewal. For Beatty, that clearly did not happen, but nor was this moment simply reducible to commercial imperatives. Instead, there was an awkwardness at the interface of the YouTube ‘v-log’ format and the spectacle of the media event.

And, again, Lou Rutigliano finds, in studying a community media project in Chicago, that the field of networked journalism, as he terms it, contains multiple and competing roles and goals for those taking part in that space. Individuals writing for the community blog must at times do considerable work to negotiate these different ways of, in Bourdieu’s terms, performing the habitus of the community blogger.

There do not seem to be predictable or stable patterns of change in journalism as it adapts to a world in which social media platforms are becoming a major element in people’s media time and are expanding to encompass public, consumer and work-related communication. In many places, scholars are observing a collective journalistic experiment. So Avery Holton and Seth Lewis find that a significant number of the journalists who use the micro-blogging service, Twitter, are using humour in their posts. That suggests to them that there’s an embrace of a different kind of relationship, one valuing involvement over detachment and implicit shared knowledge alongside explicit facts. Yet how journalists use humour appears variable and no overall conclusion can be made about how humour functions, and indeed how the communication of public knowledge is inflected.

This sense of contingency should not be confused, however, with any sense of social openness. Both Christina Smith and Dace Zandfelde give ample evidence of the ways that existing relations of power may be reinscribed through the incorporation of social media forms in professional journalism. From Latvia, Zandfelde notes the risks that journalists re-tweeting information will act as amplifiers for company press releases and marketing strategies. From the US, during the prolonged occupation of Iraq, Smith traces the way that a viral music video by soldiers relating their experiences of patrolling the city of Ramadi was made ideologically safe by news organisations. Sheetal Agarwal and Angela Abel analyse the restricted ways in which CNN’s domestic US news channel uses tweets as news sources, and in doing so reinstating the credibility of existing public figures. While the news organisation extends its newsgathering practices to make use of Twitter, it does so in a ccordance with long standing understandings of who has standing in society, so that private individuals’ tweets come to be very rarely used as factual testimony.

These studies, some of them case studies and some large-scale content analyses, are important in the snapshots they provide of various ways in which social media and journalism inter-relate. They are also important, however, in helping scholarship identify what is at stake as social media and journalism interact. Brands, notions of public service, sourcing practices and ideological power have all been widely noted in the literature as potentially reworked in this encounter. As guest editor of this issue, my reading is that the papers overall point to one central criterion by which news media may be judged as they develop in this space: the quality of the relationships that they form with people in social media. US networks used, but did not listen very deeply to, the music video-making soldiers in Ramadi. The journalist tweeters compete with a plethora of voices for attention through their witty one-liners, taking them towards the para-journalistic relations that Jon Stewart has with his audiences. How these relations develop emerges as a central focus for further research.


Acknowledgements

Very grateful thanks to the reviewers for their time and thoughtful comments on papers submitted for this issue:

Stuart Allan
Babak Bahador
Vian Bakir
Mark Balnaves
Axel Bruns
Geoff Craig
Luke Goode
Ari Heinonen
Liesbeth Hermans
Alfred Hermida
Beate Josephi
Mohammed Musa
Jose Noguera
Mark Pearson
Verica Rupar
Georgios Terzis
Neil Thurman
Karin Wahl-Jorgensen
Melissa Wall
Tamara Witschge


L’introduction de l’éditeur

Donald Matheson
Université de Canterbury | Te Whare Wānanga o Waitaha
Christchurch, la Nouvelle-Zélande
| Aotearoa

L’analyse des médias émergents ont tendances a opérer à travers des dichotomies. Il y a le vieux journalisme, et il y a le nouveau journalisme. Il y a le citoyen, et il y a les institutionnels ou professionnels. Ces ensembles de termes sont d’utilités heuristiques à identifier ce qui est en jeu dans le changement des pratiques médiatiques depuis longtemps et leurs relations avec l’auditoire. Mais, comme le montre ce numéro spécial sur les relations entre les médias sociaux et le journalisme, il n’y a aucun ensemble stable de ce genre de formations dans la pratique.

En fait, l’éventualité de toutes ces catégories est la conclusion qui unit toutes ces études. Cela est vrai si on envisage la Lettonie, les États-Unis ou la Nouvelle-Zélande. Dès que, par exemple, le National Public Radio commence en offrant à ses fans sur Facebook des « cadeaux » virtuels mettant en vedette son image de marque a envoyer à leurs amis, sa relation avec les utilisateurs change de façon qui sont multiples et difficiles à retracer. Comme le montre Shawn Day, certains fans de NPR sur Facebook sont à l’aise avec cette façon d’afficher leur fanatisme, tandis que d’autres le rejette comme ne correspondent pas à la relation qu’ils veulent avec un diffuseur de radio du service public ou de la façon dont ils veulent utiliser Facebook. Au moment de l’étude et proche du million de fan, NPR a clairement r&eacu te;ussie de plusieurs façons de s’établir dans les mondes sociaux du peuple. Pourtant les fans sont assez publiquement impliqués, sur une base quotidienne, en travaillant sur ce que suppose ce domaine des fans. Ce que cela signifie pour une organisation d’information dans les médias sociaux est d’être impliqué dans l’évolution des relations avec les gens.

De même, Bronwyn Beatty montre des tensions importantes au sein de l’utilisation des contributions des citoyens à la télévision de Nouvelle Zélande dans un débat des dirigeants politiques produit professionnellement. Dans ce qu’il affirmait était une première expérience mondiale, TVNZ a fait équipe avec YouTube pour solliciter des questions a poser aux chefs de partis, enveloppant la tentative dans un discours du renouveau démocratique. Pour Beatty, cela n’a pas lieu, mais ce n’était pas simplement due aux impératives commerciales. Au lieu de cela, il y avait une erreur à l’interface du format « v-log » de YouTube et dans le spectacle de l’événement médiatique.

Et, encore une fois, Lou Rutigliano conclut, dans l’étude des projets médiatiques communautaires à Chicago, le domaine du journalisme en réseau contient de multiples et concurrents rôles pour ceux qui prennent part à cet espace. Les individus écrivant pour le blog communautaire doivent parfois faire un travail considérable pour négocier ces différentes façons, selon le terme de Bourdieu, en effectuant l’habitus de blogueur de la communauté.

Il ne semble pas y avoir de comportements prévisibles ou stables de changement dans le journalisme car il s’adapte à un monde dans lequel les plates-formes médiatiques sociales deviennent un élément majeur dans le temps des médias du peuple et prennent de l’expansion pour englober le public, le consommateur et la communication liées au travail. Dans de nombreux endroits, les chercheurs observent une expérience journalistique collective. Avery Holton et Seth Lewis trouvent un nombre important de journalistes qui utilisent le micro blog de Twitter et utilise l’humour dans leurs courriers. Cela suggère qu’il y a un engagement d’un autre type de relation, une participation de valorisation au détachement et la connaissance partagée implicite aux côtés de faits explicites. Mais comment les journalistes utilisent l’humour apparaît variable et aucu ne conclusion générale ne peut être faite sur la façon dont l’humour fonctionne et, en fait, comment la communication de la connaissance du public est altérée.

Ce sentiment d’urgence ne devrait pas confondre, cependant, à un quelconque sentiment d’ouverture sociale. Christina Smith et Dace Zandfelde donnent bien nombres d’évidences que les relations existantes de puissance peuvent être réinscrite grâce à l’incorporation des formes de médias sociaux dans le journalisme professionnel. De la Lettonie, Zandfelde relève les risques que les journalistes qui re-tweet l’information servira d’amplificateurs pour les communiqués de presse des compagnies et des stratégies de marketing. Des États-Unis, pendant la durée de l’occupation de l’Irak, Smith retrace la façon qu’un clip vidéo par des soldats concernant leurs expériences de patrouiller dans la ville de Ramadi était idéologiquement sécuritaire d’organisations de presse. Sheetal Agarwal et Angela Abel analysent les façons restreintes dans lequel les informations intérieure américaine de CNN ont utilisé les tweets comme sources de nouvelles en faisant donc rétablir la crédibilité des personnalités existantes. Alors que l’organisation de nouvelles étend ses pratiques de collecte de nouvelles à utiliser Twitter, il le fait conformément aux ententes de longue date reconnu pour agir dans la société, afin que les tweets des individus privés viennent à être très rarement utilisé comme témoignage factuel.

Ces études dont certaines sont des études de cas et d’autres des analyses de contenu à grande échelle, sont importantes car elles fournissent de différentes façons dans laquelle les médias sociaux et le journalisme interviennent. Ils sont également importants, cependant, en aidant les bourses d’études à identifier ce qui est en jeu, comme les médias sociaux et le journalisme interagissent. Les marques, les notions de la fonction publique, les pratiques d’approvisionnement et de puissance idéologique ont toutes été largement notés dans la littérature comme étant potentiellement retravaillée dans cette rencontre. Comme rédacteur invité de cette question, ma lecture est que les journaux globaux pointent vers un critère central par lequel les médias d’informations peuvent être évalu&eacu te;s comme ils se développent dans cet espace : la qualité des relations qu’ils forment avec les gens dans les médias sociaux. Les réseaux américains ont utilisé mais n’ont pas écouté très en profondeur les soldats responsables du clip vidéo de Ramadi. Les tweeters journalistes rivalisent avec nombre de voix pour attirer l’attention à travers leur ingéniosité pleine d’esprit, les emmenant vers les relations para-journalistiques que Jon Stewart a avec son public. Comment ces relations se développent apparaissent comme un élément central pour poursuivre les recherches.


Journalists, social media, and the use of humor on Twitter

Avery E. Holton
University of Texas
Austin, Texas, USA

and

Seth C. Lewis
University of Minnesota–Twin Cities
Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

Abstract. At a time when news organizations are struggling to grab the attention of audiences in a media-saturated environment, social networking sites (SNS) have created novel opportunities for journalists to connect with followers online—raising questions about how types of social media use might be associated with forging greater connection with users. Just as satire has proven a potent force for attracting audiences to fake news TV programs, it’s reasonable to consider that humor might be an emerging tool for connection in social media spaces where journalists increasingly conduct their work. Through a content analysis of more than 22,000 tweets (or microblog posts), this study examines the extent to which the 430 most-followed journalists on Twitter are using humor—and how such use is associated with other forms of engagement on Twitter. Findings indicate that a journalist’s use of humor is closely associated with sharing o pinion and personal life details, and engaging in interpersonal discussion. Moreover, the use of humor is positively related to a journalist’s level of activity on Twitter, suggesting that journalists who become more accustomed to this social space are more apt to adopt its milieu of informality, conversation, and humor. Finally, journalists from less elite news organizations tend to use humor more frequently. These and other findings are discussed in light of challenges facing the journalism field as it negotiates questions of participation and professionalism in digital media spaces.

Les journalistes, les médias sociaux et l’utilisation de l’humour sur Twitter : Abrégé: À une époque où les organismes de presse ont du mal à attirer l’attention de l’auditoire dans un environnement saturée de médias, les sites de réseaux sociaux (SNS) ont créé de nouvelles possibilités pour les journalistes de se connecter avec des disciples en ligne — soulevant des questions à savoir comment les types d’utilisations des médias sociaux pourraient être associés afin de forger une meilleure connexion avec les utilisateurs. Tout comme la satire s’est avérée une puissante force pour attirer les auditoires à falsifier des programmes de nouvelles sur la télévision, il est raisonnable de considérer que l’humou r pourrait être un outil émergent pour connecter dans des espaces de médias sociaux où les journalistes conduisent de plus en plus leurs travaux. Grâce à une analyse du contenu de plus de 22 000 tweets (ou postes de micro blog), cette étude examine le degré auquel les 430 journalistes les plus suivit sur Twitter utilisent l’humour — et comment cette utilisation est associée avec d’autres formes d’engagement sur Twitter. Les constatations qu’utiliser un journaliste humoriste est étroitement associée à la partage de l’opinion et des détails de la vie personnelle et engage les discussions interpersonnelles. En outre, l’utilisation de l’humour est positivement liée au niveau du journaliste de son activité sur Twitter, suggérant que les journalistes qui sont plus habitués à cet espace social sont plus portés &agrav e; adopter son milieu informel de conversation et d’humour. Enfin, les journalistes des organismes de presse moins élite tendent à utiliser l’humour plus fréquemment. Celles-ci et d’autres conclusions sont discutées aux défis auxquels sont confronté le domaine du journalisme comme il négocie les questions de participation et de professionnalisme dans les espaces de médias numériques.


Tweet credibility: How CNN frames credibility of information from non-traditional sources in broadcast reporting

Sheetal D. Agarwal
University of Washington
Seattle, Washington, USA

and

Angela D. Abel
University of Washington
Seattle, Washington, USA

Abstract. Historically, journalists have tended to rely on what Howard Becker (1967) defines as the “hierarchy of credibility” in which sources at the top of hierarchical structures such as government are given more credibility than sources at the bottom. Citizen-generated information challenges these journalistic norms and sourcing practices. This paper examines how CNN, a traditional mass media news organization, used Twitter in its broadcast reporting during two distinct circumstances: general news coverage, and in coverage of the 2009 Iran election protest, a breaking-news event in which Twitter played a critical information dissemination role. A content analysis of 378 discrete instances in which CNN incorporated Twitter into broadcast news reports between June 1 and August 5, 2009, reveals that CNN most often used Twitter in hard news and domestic stories and that CNN used Twitter more as a source of informat ion than as a tool to interact with the audience. We also find that across all stories, tweets from public officials and tweets that included opinion and commentary received significantly higher credibility scores than tweets from private figures or that contained on-the-ground reporting. Iran election stories showed similar trends, though no significant findings emerged.

La crédibilité du Tweet : comment CNN encadre la crédibilité de l’information provenant de sources non traditionnelles dans la diffusion de rapports : Abrégé: Historiquement, les journalistes ont tendance à s’appuyer sur ce que Howard Becker (1967) définit comme « la hiérarchie de crédibilité » dans lequel les sources au sommet des structures hiérarchiques comme le gouvernement sont donnés plus de crédibilité que les sources en bas. Les informations générées par les citoyens contestent ces normes journalistiques et ces pratiques de l’approvisionnement. Cet article examine comment CNN, un organisme de presse traditionnel des médias de masse, a utilisé Twitter lors de sa diffusion de rapports sur deux circonstances distinctes : la couve rture de l’actualité générale, et dans la couverture de la protestation de l’élection en Iran en 2009, un événement dans laquelle Twitter a joué un rôle dans la diffusion d’informations critiques. Une analyse du contenu des 378 instances distinctes où CNN a incorporé Twitter dans les bulletins de nouvelles diffusées entre le 1er juin et le 5 août 2009, révèle que CNN a plus souvent utilisé Twitter pour les informations dures ainsi que les informations nationales et que CNN utilisé Twitter plus comme une source d’information que comme un outil pour interagir avec le public. Nous trouvons aussi que dans l’ensemble de toutes les histoires, les tweets de fonctionnaires et les tweets qui inclus avis et commentaires ont reçu des scores de crédibilité bien plus élevés que les tweets de figures privés ou ce qui contenait des rapports du terrain. Les histoires d’élection en Iran montrent des tendances semblables même si aucune conclusion importante n’en a émergé.


Creative digital expressions during the Iraq war:
Lazy Ramadi as a case study in soldier-produced social media

Christina M. Smith
Ramapo College of New Jersey
Mahwah, New Jersey, USA

Abstract. During the War in Iraq, videos produced, uploaded, and circulated by soldiers served as a form of vernacular creativity. Many soldier-produced videos were highly popular, as their circulation on the playback window of numerous video sites was re-mediated and further disseminated through mainstream media coverage. One popular video entitled “Lazy Ramadi” provides insight into the deployment of social media within news discourse and imagery. In the case of “Lazy Ramadi,” mainstream news media integrated the voices of the soldiers on the battlefield, in order to respond to the video’s popularity and provide consuming audiences with a “boots on the ground” perspective while simultaneously de-legitimizing the journalistic value of such productions. Mainstream news coverage of the video focused on its humor and novelty value, and therefore functioned as a means to support the war effort. More importantly, the video’s deployment in news and popular culture programming failed to recognize or interrogate its implicit critiques of the war effort. Ultimately, this served to reinforce the dominance of institutional military organizations and journalistic norms.

Des expressions numériques créatives au cours de la guerre en Irak :  Lazy Ramadi comme une étude de cas produite par des soldats de médias sociaux : Abrégé: Au cours de la guerre en Irak, des vidéos produites, téléchargées et distribuées par des soldats ont servis comme une forme de créativité vernaculaire. Plusieurs vidéos produites par des soldats étaient très populaires comme leur circulation sur de nombreux sites vidéos ont été remédié et diffusée par le biais des médias traditionnels. Une vidéo populaire intitulé « Lazy Ramadi » (2007) nous éclaire sur le déploiement des médias sociaux dans les discours des nouvelles et des images. Dans le cas de « Lazy Ramadi, » les médias grand public ont intégré les voix des soldats sur le champ de bataille afin de répondre à la popularité ; de la vidéo et à fournir aux auditoires une perspective de « bottes sur le terrain » tout en rendant illégitime la valeur journalistique de ces productions. La couverture médiatique de la vidéo de part sa valeur d’humour et de nouveauté a fonctionné comme un moyen de soutenir l’effort de guerre. Plus important encore, le déploiement de la vidéo dans les nouvelles et dans la programmation culturelle populaire a été incapable de reconnaître ou d’interroger ses critiques implicites sur l’effort de guerre. En fin de compte, cela a servi à renforcer la domination des organisations militaires institutionnelles et les normes journalistiques.


“Become a fan.”
Maintaining news media hegemony through Facebook and brand equity

Shawn Day
Old Dominion University
Norfolk, Virginia, USA

Abstract. Social media platforms that empower consumers to publish and disseminate information threaten the dominance of traditional news organizations. Using a theoretical framework based on the Customer-Based Brand Equity Pyramid, participatory culture, and hegemony, this paper examines the potential for legacy media institutions to maintain power by developing a collaborative relationship with the audience. An analysis of three of the most recognizable U.S. news media organizations – CNN, National Public Radio and The New York Times – on Facebook provides insight into current social network strategies and forms the basis for discussion and recommendations.

« Devenir un fan ». Le maintien d’hégémonie des médias d’information par le biais de Facebook et la valeur de la marque : Abrégé: Les plates-formes des médias sociaux permettent aux consommateurs de publier et de diffuser l’information menacent la domination des médias traditionnels. À l’aide d’un cadre théorique basé sur la pyramide de la clientèle Brand Equity, la culture participative et l’hégémonie, cet article examine le potentiel pour les institutions de l’héritage de médias à conserver le pouvoir en développant une relation de collaboration avec le public. Une analyse de trois des plus reconnaissables des organisations médiatiques américaine– CNN, National Public Radio et le New York Times – sur Facebook donne un aperçu des stratégies actuelles de réseau social et sert de base à la discussion et à des recommandations.


Social media in the arena of the traditional business media in Latvia:
What did the “Falling Meteorite” bring?

Dace Zandfelde
University of Latvia
Riga, Latvia

Abstract. This paper investigates the use of social media by business and economic news journalists in Latvia’s traditional media. Through qualitative study of the use of social media within this form of news journalism, it aims to clarify the use of social media in journalism, the impact on reporting and journalists’ attitudes to social media as a source. The empirical study identifies three cases from 2009 and 2010 that pushed social media onto journalists’ agenda. It shows that social media are becoming a stable part of business and economic journalism in Latvia as a new source for traditional reporting. Social media represent an opportunity to open up the “blind spot” of the uncritical use of business PR. There is also some criticism that forms such as Twitter are exacerbating the tendency to reduce reporting to the reproduction of quotes.

Les médias sociaux dans l’arène des médias commerciaux traditionnels en Lettonie : qu’a apporter la « Falling Meteorite » ? : Abrégé: Cet article examine l’utilisation des médias sociaux par les entreprises et les journalistes de la presse économique dans les médias traditionnels de la Lettonie. Par le biais de l’étude qualitative de l’utilisation des médias sociaux au sein de cette forme de journalisme d’actualités, il vise à clarifier l’utilisation des médias sociaux dans le journalisme, l’impact sur les rapports et les attitudes des journalistes de médias sociaux comme source. l’étude empirique identifie trois cas de 2009 à 2010, ce qui a poussé les médias sociaux sur l’ordre du jour des journalistes. Il mont re que les médias sociaux deviennent une partie stable d’affaires et de journalisme économique en Lettonie comme une nouvelle source de rapports traditionnels. Les médias sociaux représentent l’occasion d’ouvrir l’ « angle mort » de l’utilisation inconsidérée des relations d’affaires publiques. Il y a aussi quelques critiques que les formes telles que Twitter qui exacerbent la tendance à réduire les rapports à une reproduction des citations.


The field of networked journalism

Lou Rutigliano
DePaul University
Chicago, Illinois, USA

Abstract. Bourdieu used the concept of fields in an attempt to link culture to questions of political economy. His later work began to consider the field of journalism as a key site for the relationship between culture and power. This paper uses the expanded notion of networked journalism, which includes the mass media as one of many actors participating in journalistic activities online, and examines the case of a citizen journalism initiative in a low-income neighborhood in Chicago to see how pervasive the traditional culture of mainstream journalism is within this network. Through observations and interviews with participants in the initiative the author finds multiple tensions between this traditional journalistic culture and new hybrid journalistic cultures which have the potential to improve upon one of journalism’s key weaknesses – coverage of the marginalized. That is, unless the traditional journalistic cu lture partially responsible for said coverage proves equally influential upon “citizen” journalists operating outside the mainstream.

Le domaine du journalisme en réseau : Abrégé: Bourdieu a utilisé le concept de champs dans une tentative de lier la culture aux questions de politique économique. Son travail a commencé à examiner le domaine du journalisme comme un site clé pour la relation entre la culture et la puissance. Ce document utilise la notion élargie de journalisme en réseau, ce qui comprend les médias de masse comme l’un des nombreux acteurs qui participent aux activités journalistiques en ligne et examine le cas d’une initiative de journalisme citoyen dans un quartier à faible revenu de Chicago pour voir à quel point la culture traditionnelle du journalisme ordinaire est envahit au sein de ce réseau. Grâce à des observations et à des entrevues avec les participants de cette initiative, l&r squo;auteur conclut qu’il existe de multiples tensions entre cette culture journalistique traditionnelle et ces nouvelles cultures journalistiques hybrides qui ont le potentiel pour une des faiblesses clés du journalisme – améliorer la couverture des marginalisés. Cela est vrai à moins que la culture journalistique traditionnelle partiellement responsable de cette couverture prouve être aussi influent sur le journaliste « citoyen » opérant en dehors du courant dominant.


“Making democracy a living, breathing thing”:
YouTube videos and democratic practice in the 2008 ONE News YouTube Election Debate

Bronwyn E. Beatty
New Zealand Broadcasting School
Christchurch, New Zealand

Abstract. The 2008 ONE News YouTube Election Debate in New Zealand was promoted by TVNZ and YouTube executives as innovative public service broadcasting that enabled unprecedented access to the country’s two leading politicians. But according to TVNZ’s Digital Media division the primary purpose of the broadcaster’s partnership with the popular social media company for the debate was to extend its brand and reach. This article examines the live televised debate, arguing that the commercial imperatives were of more interest to TVNZ as it seeks to reorient itself as a digital media company alongside its public service broadcasting mandate.

« Rendre la démocratie vivante » :  Les vidéos de YouTube et les pratiques démocratiques en 2008 dans un débat de YouTube sur les élections : Abrégé: Le débat sur YouTube pour les élections de 2008 en Nouvelle-Zélande fut promu par les cadres de TVNZ et de YouTube comme service public novateur de radiodiffusion qui ont permis un accès sans précédent à deux dirigeants politiques du pays. Mais selon la division des médias numériques de TVNZ, l’objet principal du partenariat du diffuseur avec l’entreprise de médias sociaux populaires pour le débat était à étendre sa marque et à atteindre un public plus nombreux. Cet article examine le débat télévisé en direct, affirmant que les impératifs commerciaux sont plus intéressants à TVNZ qui cherche à se réorienter comme une entrepri se de médias numériques aux côtés de son mandat de radiodiffusion de service public.


Watching Oprah in Kuwait:
A qualitative and quantitative investigation

Shaheed Nick Mohammed
Penn State Altoona
Altoona, Pennsylvania, USA

Mary Queen
American University of Kuwait
Salmiya, Kuwait

Abstract: The present study examines motivations and perceptions among university students in Kuwait and their personal networks regarding The Oprah Winfrey Show. It probes the processes by which audience members who are not within the primary cultural scope of the program nevertheless adapt it to their own needs and lifestyles. The authors attempt to elucidate the processes and devices that reconcile the Oprah universe with Kuwaiti reality in viewers’ minds. Qualified support is found for active interpretation and cultural reconciliation which are both considered in the context of notions of Kraidy’s hybridity and Olson’s transparency. The authors propose “perspective adjustment” and “content accommodation” as two strategies used by viewers to reconcile their cultural dissonance to exogenous and even potentially offensive content.

Regarder Oprah au Koweït : une enquête qualitative et quantitative : L’étude présente examine les motivations et les perceptions parmi les étudiants de l’Université au Koweït et leurs réseaux personnels concernant The Oprah Winfrey Show. Elle sonde les processus par lequel les membres auditoires qui ne sont pas dans la portée culturelle primaire du programme néanmoins adapteraient à leurs propres besoins et à leurs modes de vie. Les auteurs tentent d’élucider les processus et les dispositifs qui réconcilient l’univers d’Oprah avec la réalité koweïtienne dans les esprits des téléspectateurs. Le soutien qualifié est trouvé comme interprétation active et comme réconciliation culturelle qui sont considérés comme dans le contexte des notions d’hybridité de Kraidy et de transparence de Olson. Les auteurs proposent « un ajustement du point de vue » et « l’hébergement du contenu » comme deux stratégies utilisées par les téléspectateurs à réconcilier leur dissonance culturelle au contenu exogène et même potentiellement offensant.


Copyright 2011 Communication Institute for Online Scholarship, Inc.

This file may not be publicly distributed or reproduced without written permission of
the Communication Institute for Online Scholarship,
P.O. Box 57, Rotterdam Jct., NY 12150 USA (phone: 518-887-2443).