Communication Institute for Online Scholarship
Communication Institute for Online
Scholarship Continous online service and innovation
since 1986
Site index
 
ComAbstracts Visual Communication Concept Explorer Tables of Contents Electronic Journal of Communication ComVista

EJC 25(1 & 2): Gender, Work, and Family / ISSUE TITLE IN FRENCH
Electronic Journal of Communication

Volume 25 Numbers 1 & 2, 2015

The Slow Drip of Change: Gender Relations of Caring and Earnings /
Le changement au goutte à goutte :
Les relations du genre de l’attentionné et du gain

With Editor / Avec éditeur :

Caryn E. Medved
Baruch College
City University of New York
New York, NY, USA

Editor’s Introduction: The Slow Drip of Change: Gender Relations of Caring and Earning / L’introduction de l’éditeur : Le changement au goutte à goutte : Les relations du genre de l’attentionné et du gain

Caryn E. Medved
Baruch College
City University of New York
New York, NY, USA

Daddy Boot Camp: Articulating Discourses of Militarism, Managerialism, and Consumerism / Le camp d’entraînement de papa : l’articulation des échanges de militarisme, du managérialisme, et du consumérisme

Jason Zingsheim
Governors State University
University Park, IL, USA

Alexandra G. Murphy
DePaul University
Chicago, IL, USA

Angela Trethewey
California State University, Chico
Chico, CA, USA


Invited Personal Essays

Caregiving and Siblings: Three Stories

Katherine Miller
Arizona State University
Tempe, AZ, USA

Lauren M. Amaro
Pepperdine University
Malibu, CA, USA

Familyarizing: Work/Life Balance for Single, Childfree and Chosen Family

Jenny Dixon
Marymount Manhattan College
New York, NY, USA


Book Reviews

Book Review: Angry White Men: American Masculinity at the End of an Era by Michael Kimmel

Chris Clemens
San Francisco State University
San Francisca, CA, USA

Book Review: The End of Men and the Rise of Women by Hanna Rosin

Adam C. Earnheardt
Youngstown State University
Youngstown, OH, USA

Book Review: The New Feminist Agenda: Defining the Next Revolution for Women, Work, and Family by M. M. Kunin

Erika M. Thomas
California State University, Fullerton
Fullerton, CA, USA

Book Review: I'm Every Woman: Remixed Stories of Marriage, Motherhood and Work by Lonnae O'Neal Parker

Chizoba Udeorji
University of Maryland University College
Adelphi, MD, USA

Book Review: Inclusive Masculinity: The Changing Nature of Masculinities by Eric Anderson

John Ike Sewell
The University of West Georgia
Carrollton, GA, USA

Book Review: Tell It Like It Is: Women in the National Welfare Rights Movement by Mary E. Triece

Kerry B. Wilson
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Champaign, IL, USA

Book Review: Reshaping the Work-Family Debate: Why Men and Class Matter by Joan C. Williams

Daniel E. Rossi-Keen
Solomon’s Republic
Aliquippa, PA, USA

Book Review: Lean In: Women, Work and the Will to Lead by Sheryl Sandberg

Samantha L. Szczur
Eastern Illinois University
Charleston, IL, USA


Editor's Introduction:
The Slow Drip of Change: Gender Relations of Caring and Earning

Caryn E. Medved
Baruch College
City University of New York
New York, NY, USA

Resistance and change in gender relations of work and family unavoidably exist side-by-side; each containing the seeds of its opposing force in ongoing processes of change (Clair, 1994; Mumby, 2005). Discursive and material practices of caregiving and wage earning continuously are enabled and constrained across and within the public and private spheres. This special issue of Journal of Electronic Communication/La Revue Electronique de Communication is dedicated to scholarship that explores what feminist sociologist Oriel Sullivan (2004) calls the “slow drip” of social change. Following theorizing in communication studies, Sullivan makes visible and consequential every day interactions as resistance to gender hegemony. She contrasts these moments of resistance with traditional masculinist descriptions of relatively dramatic change (i.e., wars, movements, elections, legislation, etc.). Sullivan posits a different image. One that is valuable to our discipline as well; that of “a slow dripping of change” that is “unnoticeable from year to year but in the end is persistent enough to lead to the slow dissolution of previously existing structures” in which “daily practices and interactions both reflect and are constitutive of attitudes and discourse… that stretch perhaps over generations” (p. 201).

As communication scholars, we must possess a belief in the power of words, messages, interactions, as well as, language and discourse to contribute to positive social change in our world. Yet change often is tricky to catch sight of, to name, and to substantiate. Stability and change are contradictory, paradoxical, and messy processes (Trethewey & Ashcraft, 2004). Yet their investigation and translation into practice are essential to feminist progress. The scholarship contained in this issue explores resistance to change and resistance as change in hegemonic gender relations of work and family, of caring and earning, of labor and love.

In “Daddy Boot Camp: Articulating Discourses of Militarism, Managerialism, and Consumerism” Jason Zingsheim, Alexa Murphy, and Angela Trethewey analyze a workshop for soon-to-be fathers that teaches men to negotiate and assimilate childrearing duties through what these authors call a “militarized/corporatized” model of fathering. Their analysis illustrates ways this intervention serves to reproduce hegemonic gender relations. Still they acknowledge that there also exist “discursive contradictions and fissures that offer spaces to transform extant assumptions about, meanings for, and practices and identities of fathers.” Kirstie McAllum and Marta Elvira explore caregiving in the context of gendered labor markets and politics of care work. In “Zeros, Service Providers or Heros: Dignity and the Communicative Politics of Care Work,” they analyze how three dominant discourses (i.e., economic exchange, entrepreneurial professi onalism, and communitarianism) construct “grammars of care” that indicate who should care, what constitutes care, and actions suitable to the care relationship. These grammars, they argue, constrain and enable the possibilities for care workers’ dignity and their continued study offer hope for expanding opportunities for expanding self-worth in paid care work.

“A Thematic Analysis of the Online Profiles of Same Sex Couples Hoping to Adopt” by Dennis Patrick and Christopher Schrmischer present an analysis of how the loosening of heteronormativity in the context of adoption in the US creates new prospects as well as roadblocks. In an analysis of online adoption profiles of gay and lesbian couples, we see how couples who are de facto fighting heteronormativity by marketing themselves as potential adoptive parents are also constricted in their discourse by these very same hegemonic relations. Sarah Jane Blithe investigates the challenge of mothers enabled through technology to perform what she calls the “simultaneous shift” of working for wages and caregiving. In this study we see how technological changes that, from one vantage point, might represent positive change in our abilities to do both care and paid labors can also result in identity crises for some mothers/women/workers. Finally , in a brief theoretical essay, I introduce feminist sociologist Francine Deutsch’s (2007) notion of undoing gender and explore its value in my own scholarship on stay-at-home fathers and breadwinning mothers. Further, I suggest work-family communication scholarship can benefit from purposive explorations of undoing gender through discourse and related practices. The two personal essays that follow expand our thinking on resistance and change in work-family issues into eldercare (Miller and Amaro) and LGBTQ experiences (Dixon). This special issue then closes with a set of book reviews on contemporary issues at the nexus of caregiving and wage earning, including: angry White men, transfeminism and transgendered peoples, breadwinning mothers, African American stay-at-home mothers, welfare policies, and executive women, among others.

References

Clair, R. P. (1994). Resistance and oppression as a self‐contained opposite: An organizational communication analysis of one man's story of sexual harassment. Western Journal of Communication, 58, 235-262.

Deutsch, F. M. (2007). Undoing Gender. Gender & Society, 21, 106-127.

Mumby, D. K. (2005). Theorizing resistance in organization studies: A dialectical approach. Management Communication Quarterly, 19, 19-44.

Sullivan, O. (2004). Changing gender practices within the household: A theoretical perspective. Gender & Society, 18, 207-222.

Trethewey, A., & Ashcraft, K. L. (2004). Organized irrationality? Coping with paradox, contradiction and irony in organizational communication [Special issue]. Journal of Applied Communication Research, 32, 81-88.


L’introduction de l’éditeur :
Le changement au goutte à goutte :
Les relations du genre de l’attentionné et du gai

Caryn E. Medved
Baruch College
City University of New York
New York, NY, USA

La résistance et le changement dans les relations entre les sexes au sein du travail et de la famille existent côte-à-côte; chacun contient des graines de force opposées dans un processus en cour de changement (Clair, 1994; Mumby, 2005). Les pratiques discursives et matériels de soins et de gagner un salaire de façon continu sont permis et contraintes à travers et à l’intérieur des sphères publiques et privées. Cette édition spéciale du Journal of Electronic Communication/La Revue Electronique de Communication est dédiée à une étude universitaire qui cherche ce que la féministe sociologue Oriel Sullivan (2004) appelle le “goutte à goutte” du changement social. En suivant la théorisation des études de comm unication, Sullivan rend visible et conséquent toutes les interactions journalières comme résistance de l’hégémonie du genre. Elle contraste ces moments de résistance avec des descriptions masculines traditionnelles de changement relativement dramatique (les guerres, les mouvements; les élections, les législations, etc.). Sullivan avance une image différente. Une qui a aussi de la valeur pour notre discipline; celle “d’un changement lent” qui passe “inaperçu d’une année à l’autre mais qui à la fin est suffisamment persistante pour nous mener à la dissolution lente de nos structures qui existaient déjà” dans lesquelles “les pratiques journalières et les interactions reflètent et sont constitutives des attitudes et des échanges… qui s’étirent peut-être sur des g&eac ute;nérations” (p. 201).

En tant que chercheurs de communication, nous devons posséder une croyance dans la puissance de la parole, les messages, les interactions, ainsi que le langage et le discours ont contribuer à un changement social positif dans notre monde. Cependant un changement est souvent délicat à apercevoir, à nommer, et à justifier. La stabilité et le changement sont contradictoires, paradoxales, et sont des processus compliqués (Trethewey et Ashcraft, 2004). Cependant, leur enquête et traduction pour une mise en pratique sont essentielles pour le progrès féminin. L’étude universitaire dans cette édition examine la résistance au changement et la résistance comme un changement dans les relations du genre hégémonique du travail et de la famille, de l&rsqu o;attentionné et du gain, du travail et de l’amour.

Dans “Le camp d’entraînement de papa: l’articulation des échanges de militarisme, du managérialisme, et du consumérisme” par Jason Zingsheim, Alexa Murphy, et Angela Trethewey analysent un atelier pour des futures pères qui leur apprend à négocier et à assimiler les devoirs d’éduquer les enfants à travers ce que les auteurs appellent un modèle de “militarisation/d’entreprise” sur l’engendrement. Leur analyse illustre les façons dont cette intervention sert à reproduire les relations de genre hégémoniques. Cependant, ils reconnaissent qu’il existe “des contradictions discursives et des fissures qui offrent des endroits pour transformer des suppositions qui existent encore, du sens, et des usages et des identités des pères. Kristie McAllum et Marta Elvira explorent les personnels soignants dan s un contexte du marché du travail et de la politique du travail de soins. Dans “Zéros, l’aide à la personne ou héros : la dignité et les politiques communicatives de l’emploi des soins”, ils analysent comment trois échanges dominants (l’échange économique, le professionnalisme entrepreneurial, et le communautarianisme) construisent des “grammaires de soins” qui indique qui devrait se sentir concerné, ce que constitue les soins, et les actions appropriées pour la relation des soins. Ces grammaires, soutiennent-ils, contraignent et offrent la possibilité pour une dignité des employés du soins et pour leurs études continus leurs offrent une chance d’avoir des débouchés pour développer la dignité dans l’emploi payant des soins.

“Une analyse à thème sur les profiles en ligne des couples de même sexe souhaitant adopté” par Dennis Patrick et Christopher Schrmischer présente une analyse de la façon dont le desserrage de l’hétéronormativité dans le contexte de l’adoption aux Etats Unis crée de nouveaux espoirs ainsi que de nouveaux obstacles. Dans une analyse de profil d’adoption en ligne de couples homosexuels et lesbiens, nous voyons comment les couples qui de facto se battent contre l’hétéronormativité en se commercialisant comme potentiel parents prêt à l’adoption sont aussi gênés par ces même relations hégémoniques. Sarah Jane Blithe enquête sur les difficultés des mères qui ont été permis grâce à la technologie de faire ce qu’elle appelle un “cha ngement simultané” de travailler pour un salaire et pour être aide à la personne. Dans cette étude, nous voyons comment les changements technologiques qui, d’un point de vu, peuvent représentés des changements positifs dans nos capacités de faire d’un salarié et d’une aide à la personne peuvent aussi avoir comme résultat des crises d’identités pour certaines mères/femmes/employées. Finalement, dans un essai théorique court, j’introduis la notion de la sociologue féministe Francine Deutsch (2007) du desserrement du sexe et explore sa valeur dans mes propres recherches sur les pères aux foyers et les mères qui soutiennent les familles financièrement.  De plus, je suggère que des bourses sur la communication entre le travail et la famille peuvent être bénéfi ques pour des explorations objectives sur le desserrement du sexe à travers des échanges et des pratiques liées. Les deux essais personnels qui suit développent notre pensée sur la résistance et le changement dans les problèmes d’emploi et de famille dans les soins pour les gens âgés (Miller et Amaro) et les expériences des LGBTQ (Dixon). Cette édition spéciale fini avec une critique littéraire sur des problèmes contemporains sur les soins et gagner un salaire comme par exemple : les hommes blancs en colère, le trans-féminisme et les gens transsexuels, les mères gagne-pain, les mères Afro-Américaines au foyer, la politique des allocations, et les femmes cadres, entre autres.

Références

Clair, R. P. (1994). Resistance and oppression as a self‐contained opposite: An organizational communication analysis of one man's story of sexual harassment. Western Journal of Communication, 58, 235-262.

Deutsch, F. M. (2007). Undoing Gender. Gender & Society, 21, 106-127.

Mumby, D. K. (2005). Theorizing resistance in organization studies: A dialectical approach. Management Communication Quarterly, 19, 19-44.

Sullivan, O. (2004). Changing gender practices within the household: A theoretical perspective. Gender & Society, 18, 207-222.

Trethewey, A., & Ashcraft, K. L. (2004). Organized irrationality? Coping with paradox, contradiction and irony in organizational communication [Special issue]. Journal of Applied Communication Research, 32, 81-88.


Daddy Boot Camp: Articulating Discourses of Militarism, Managerialism, and Consumerism

Jason Zingsheim
Governors State University
University Park, IL, USA

Alexandra G. Murphy
DePaul University
Chicago, IL, USA

Angela Trethewey
California State University, Chico
Chico, CA, USA

Abstract: Boot Camp for New Dads (BCND) is a workshop for soon-to-be-fathers that teaches men to negotiate and integrate childrearing duties into a militarized/corporatized model of parenting based on public, paid, and instrumental employment. Ethnographic observation and post-structural analysis reveal how fatherhood is discursively constructed by explicitly framing the practices and skills of fathers in ways that reproduce and reinscribe militarism, managerialism, and consumerism. Paternal identity is articulated as dependent upon the successful integration and enactment of protector, manager, and consumer.

Le camp d’entraînement de papa: l’articulation des échanges de militarisme, du managérialisme, et du consumérisme : Abrégé : Un camp d’entraînement pour les nouveaux pères est un atelier pour les hommes qui seront prochainement pères et qui leur apprend a négocier et a intégrer les devoirs d’élever les enfants dans un modèle militarisé/d’entreprise basé sur un travail important, public, et payé. Les observations ethnographiques et les analyses structurelles révèlent comment la paternité est construite de façon discursive en encadrant explicitement les pratiques et les compétences des pères dans des façons qui reproduisent et re-dédit le militarisme, le managérialisme, et le consumérisme. L’identit&eacu te; paternelle est articulée comme dépendante de l’intégration et de la représentation du protecteur, du directeur, et du consommateur.


Zeroes, Service Providers, or Heroes?
Dignity and the Communicative Politics of Care Work

Kirstie McAllum
Université de Montréal
Montréal, QC, Canada

Marta M. Elvira
IESE Business School
Madrid, Spain

Abstract: All economies are confronted by a growing care crisis: Both public and private organizations are struggling to recruit and retain adequate numbers of workers willing to provide care for elderly or chronically ill persons. While some social commentators argue that poor pay and excessive workload, caused by under-staffing and insufficient funding, lie at the heart of the problem, we propose that the pressing labor shortages stem partly from the problematic relationship between care work and dignity and are influenced by the broader socio-political context. We elaborate on how dominant discourses construct specific “grammars of care” which indicate who should care, what constitutes care, and the actions proper to the care relationship. We show that the discourses of economic exchange, entrepreneurial professionalism, and communitarianism constrain care workers’ choices in important ways, thereby limiting workers’ ability to achieve workplace dignity. Finally, we call for action with some optimism: as the meanings attributed to care work are communicatively constructed, the grammar of care can be re-scripted in ways that enhance dignity.

Zéros, l’aide à la personne ou héros : la dignité et les politiques communicatives de l’emploi des soins : Abrégé : Toutes les économies sont confrontées par une crise de soins en pleine croissance : les organisations publiques et privées ont du mal a recruté et a retenir un nombre suffisant de personnel capable de donner des soins à des personnes âgées ou à des gens chroniquement malades. Bien que certains commentateurs sociaux soutiennent que le salaire minimal et que la charge de travail excessif, créer par un manque de personnel et par un financement insuffisant, sont au coeur du problème, nous proposons que le manque de nombre d’employé est en partie lié à la relation problématique entre le travail des soins et la dignité et sont influencés pa r le contexte général socio-politique. Nous élaborons sur la façon dont les discours dominants construisent des “grammaires de soins” spécifiques qui indiques qui devrait être concerné, ce que constitue les soins, et les actions appropriées pour la relation des soins. Nous montrons que les discours sur les échanges économiques, le professionnalisme entrepreneurial, et le communautarianisme forcent les choix des employés du soin de façon importante, de ce fait limitant la capacité des employés à atteindre une dignité au travail. Enfin, nous appelons une demande d’action avec un certain optimisme : à la façon dont le sens attribué au travail de soins est construit communicativement, la grammaire des soins peut être réécrite dans des façons qui améliore la dignité.


The Stigma Management Communication Strategies of Same Sex Couples Hoping to Adopt

Dennis Patrick
Christopher Schrimscher

Eastern Michigan University
Ypsilanti, MI, USA

Abstract: The number of gay and lesbian couples interested in domestic adoption is growing, and these couples are increasingly turning to the Internet as a way of connecting with birthmothers considering adoption. While gay and lesbian families are more commonplace, there are still a number of stigmas associated with gay and lesbian parenting. This study examines the online profiles of 42 same sex couples hoping to adopt, focusing on how they manage their stigmatized identity while simultaneously presenting themselves as desirable parents.

Le stigma des stratégies de gestion communicatives des couples du même sexes ayant envie d’adopter : Abrégé : Le nombre de couples homosexuels et lesbiens intéressés par une adoption augmente, et ces couples se tournent de plus en plus sur Internet comme moyen pour communiquer avec les mères biologiques considérant une adoption. Bien que les familles homosexuelles et lesbiennes deviennent plus communs, il existe encore un nombre de stigma associé avec l’éducation des enfants par des couples homosexuels et lesbiens. Cette étude examine les profils en ligne de 42 couples du même sexe espérant adopter, en se concentrant sur la façon dont ils gèrent leurs identités stigmatisées tout en se présentant comme parents désirables.


Mobile Working Mothers and the Simultaneous Shift

Sarah Jane Blithe
University of Nevada-Reno
Reno, NV, USA

Abstract: In attempting to manage work-family responsibilities, some mothers, employed as knowledge workers and enabled by mobile technology, have started completing their paid work while, at the same time, parenting face-to-face. This study focuses on nine mothers who parent without outside childcare while engaging in mobile work, effectively rejecting the traditional “choice” between working mother and stay-at-home mother. Instead, driven by a quest for “balance,” the women in this study embrace the two identities simultaneously. The purposes of this project are to describe how these particular mothers combine work and parenting responsibilities, and to see if their efforts result in the desired work-life “balance.” This qualitative study concludes that for study participants this kind of work-parenting arrangement, termed here as the “simultaneous shift,” more often results in “inevitable failur e” rather than achieving balance.

Les mères au travail portable et le changement simultané : Abrégé : En essayant de gérer les responsabilités du travail et de la famille, certaines mères, employées comme travailleurs de connaissance et grâce à la technologie mobile, ont commencé a compléter leurs emplois rémunérés tout en faisant face à leurs rôles de parents. Cette étude se focalise sur neuf mères qui élèvent leurs enfants sans garde d’enfants tout en faisant partie du travail portable, effectivement rejetant le “choix” traditionnel entre la mère à la maison et la mère au travail. A la place, motivées par une recherche pour un “équilibre”, les femmes dans cette étude ont adopté ces deux identités simultanément. Les raisons de ce projet sont de décrire comment ces femmes ont combiné le travail et les responsabilités parentales, et de voir si leurs efforts ont aboutis à cette “balance” désiré du travail et de la vie. Cette étude qualitative conclut que pour les participants de ce genre d’arrangement entre le travail et l’éducation des enfants, appelé ici le “changement simultané”, a bien plus souvent comme résultat un “échec inévitable” que de trouver un équilibre régulier.


Work-Family Communication Research:
Contemplating Possibilities of Undoing Gender

Caryn E. Medved
Baruch College
City University of New York
New York, NY, USA

Abstract: This theoretical essay builds on and adapts the work of feminist sociologist Francine Deutsch (2007) on the concept of undoing gender. My goals are three fold: (a) to acquaint readers with key elements of Deutsch’s thinking, (b) to initiate conversations about undoing gender (and necessary adaptations of this concept for the field of communication studies) and (c) to start to build a case for why a focus on undoing gender matters particularly in relation to work-family communication research. Three of Deutsch’s propositions briefly are explored through analysis of data examples from a study of breadwinning mother/at-home father couples. This essay ends with reflections on how the concept of undoing gender can be theoretically and analytically productive in work-family communication research.

La recherche de communication sur la famille et l’emploi: Contempler les possibilités de faire le genre : Abrégé : Cette étude théorique s’appuie sur et s’adapte à l’oeuvre de la sociologue féministe Francine Deutsch (2007) sur l’idée de défaire le genre. Mon but a trois volets : (a) que les lecteurs prennent connaissance des éléments clefs de la pensée de Deutsch, (b) de lancer un dialogue au sujet de défaire le concept du genre (et les adaptations nécessaires de ce concept dans le domaine des études de communication) et (c) de démarrer un cas pour la raison pour laquelle mettre un point sur la question de la défaite du genre a de l’importance en particulier en relation avec la recherche de communication entre le travail et la famille. Trois des propositions de Deutsch sont explorées à travers une analyse d’exemples de données d’une étude de mère au travail et de père à la maison. Cet essai conclut avec des réflexions sur la façon dont le concept de défaire le genre peut être théoriquement et analytiquement productif dans la recherche de communication du travail et de la famille.



Copyright 2015 Communication Institute for Online Scholarship, Inc.

This file may not be publicly distributed or reproduced without written permission of
the Communication Institute for Online Scholarship,
P.O. Box 57, Rotterdam Jct., NY 12150 USA (phone: 518-887-2443).