Communication Institute for Online Scholarship
Communication Institute for Online
Scholarship Continous online service and innovation
since 1986
Site index
 
ComAbstracts Visual Communication Concept Explorer Tables of Contents Electronic Journal of Communication ComVista

EJC 25(1 & 2): Emotions and Organizations / ISSUE TITLE IN FRENCH
Electronic Journal of Communication

Volume 25 Numbers 3 & 4, 2015

Special edition: Emotions and Organizations /
Edition spéciale : les émotions et les organisations

With Editor / Avec éditrice  :

Pamela Lutgen-Sandvik
North Dakota State University
Fargo, ND, USA

Editor's Introduction: Emotions and Organizations / L’introduction de l’éditrice : Les émotions et les organisations

Pamela Lutgen-Sandvik
Special Issue Editor
North Dakota State University
Fargo, ND, USA

Re-claiming an Unfinished Past: From Emotional Labor to Critical Emotional Agency / Reprendre possession d’un passé inachevé : du travail émotionnel à l’agence émotionnelle critique

Kathleen J. Krone
University of Nebraska-Lincoln
Lincoln, NE, USA

Debbie S. Dougherty
University of Missouri
Columbia, MO, USA

Compartmentalizing Feelings: Examining the Role of Workplace Emotions in the Mentoring Experiences of Underrepresented Women Faculty / Compartimenter nos émotions : examiner le rôle des émotions dans le lieu du travail sur les expériences du tutorat pour les femmes professeurs sous-représentées

Lindsey B. Anderson

University of Maryland
College Park, MD, USA

Ziyu Long
Colorado State
Fort Collins, CO, USA

Patrice M. Buzzanell
Klod Kokini
Jennifer C. Batra
Robyn F. Wilson

Purdue University
West Lafayette, IN, USA


Editor's Introduction:
Emotions and Organizations

Pamela Lutgen-Sandvik
Special Issue Editor
North Dakota State University
Fargo, ND, USA

This special issue focuses on the emotional side of organizational life, as emotion is inherent to all human enterprises. The articles and issue introduction point to seven themes in emotion-organizational research from the communication field. First, emotion is central to human connections and the relationships in our organizational lives. Second, emotion has a built-in signal function, indicating when something is desirable or undesirable (and even dangerous). Third, emotion influences and in some cases directly guides our communication and other behavior. Fourth, emotion communicates, and in many cases, the emotion is the message. Fifth, we should bring emotion out from behind the relatively emotion-less variables (e.g., job satisfaction) we typically use to assess and talk about emotion. Sixth, emotionality and rationality cannot be separated. Seventh, emotion is a powerful resource in organizational life; we can use emotion expression or suppression for good or ill. In this special double-issue of EJC, authors have extended some of these themes and introduced new ways of considering emotions in our organizational lives.

In the lead article by Krone and Dougherty, “Re-claiming an Unfinished Past: From Emotional Labor to Critical Emotional Agency,” the authors argue that learning and applying the processes of critical emotional agency can animate resistance, encourage voice, and serve as a catalyst for positive social change. This piece points to the power of emotion in organizational life (Theme 7). Paul and Riforgiate’s piece, “‘Putting on a Happy Face,’ ‘Getting Back to Work,’ and ‘Letting It Go’: Traditional and Restorative Justice Understandings of Emotions at Work,” explores different ways of dealing with the painful emotions of conflict. They study teachers in two schools and the differences when schools used a traditional approach versus a restorative justice approach to managing emotionally painful conflict. This piece illustrates how dealing with emotion links us to others (Theme 1) and how what we feel elicits and guides our actions and other emotions (Theme 3). Anderson and coauthors’ article, “Compartmentalizing Feelings: Examining the Role of Workplace Emotions in the Mentoring Experiences of Underrepresented Women Faculty,” explores the emotional intricacies for women faculty of an engineering school as they negotiate a predominantly masculine (i.e., rational) model of mentoring. Despite the emotional character of mentoring relationships, academic women in nontraditional fields feel forced to suppress their emotions while enacting their rational p erformances. Their findings and the authors’ insights reaffirm the essentially emotional nature of relationships, especially mentoring relationships; the continued pressure at work to appear rational and suppress emotion (Theme 6); and the ways that dominant members in an organization can use emotion to oppress people they view as outsiders (Themes 7).

Scarduzio and Malvini-Redden’s contribution, “The Positive Outcomes of Negative Emotional Displays: A Multi-Level Analysis of Emotion in Bureaucratic Work,” points to the ironic interplays of positive and negative emotion in two highly regulated public bureaucratic systems, courtrooms and airport security. The authors explain that anger and frustration, sarcasm, and intimidation can have counterintuitive, positive outcomes for people and organizations. Their study and discussion underscore the essentially emotional essence of human connections (Theme 1); some of the ways that how we feel elicits and guides action (Theme 3); and how organizational members use emotion (even negative emotion) as an incredibly powerful organizational resource (Theme 7). Jia, Li and Titsworth explore the emotional realm of student-teacher communication in their piece, “Teaching as Emotional Work: Instructor’s Empathy and Students’ Motives to Communicate out of Class”. They examine students’ motives for communicating with instructors outside of class in terms of students’ perceptions of teachers’ concern and emotional responsiveness (i.e., teachers’ ability to listen to and respond effectively to student distress). The authors’ arguments and findings cross at least four themes—the emotionality of relating (Theme 1), the link between emotion and action (Theme 3), the power inherent in emotion (Theme 7), and that emotion is often a message in and of itself (Theme 4).

Reznik and Waite Miller’s article, “Social Allergens in the Workplace: Exploring the Effect of Perception and Emotion on Confrontation and Relational Well-Being,” looks at an issue rarely found in communication research (e.g., social allergens or the things about others that irritate us at work). Their study examines organizational members’ tendencies to confront an irritating coworker, based on whether they perceive the allergen as intentional or personally directed. Theme 3 prevails in this piece (how we feel elicits and guides our actions), but the piece also underscores that emotion communicates and sometimes is the message we interpret (Theme 4). The special issue concludes with Timothy Huffman’s article, “Ruptures in Compassion: When Recognizing, Relating, and Reacting Go Astray.” His study examines t he interactions among homeless young adults and staff in social service organizations trying to help the young adults, specifically examining the failed staff compassion. The findings suggest that despite good intentions, the recipients of staff members’ well-meaning compassionate communication can leave young adults feeling insulted, dehumanized, and delegitimized. As so much of what occurs in service organizations is relational, the study exemplifies Theme 1; it also points to the importance of our ability to read emotion cues as important signals about organizational (and human) functioning (Theme 2).

These contributions to the issue, and the themes that they draw upon in organizational studies related to emotion, receive more extensive discussion in the introduction to the issue that appears in   Belly Laughs and Crying Your Eyes Out: Themes in the Study of Emotions and Organizations, which I have co-authored with my colleagues Kelli Chromey and Emily Paskewitz.

Special Editor Notes:

Pamela Lutgen-Sandvik (Ph.D., Arizona State University) is an associate professor in the Department of Communication at North Dakota State University and the director of NDSU’s Communication Research and Training Center.  Her research focuses on emotion in the workplace, both constructive and destructive. She studies workplace bullying and the effects of positive emotion at work.


L’introduction de l’éditrice :
Les émotions et les organisations

Pamela Lutgen-Sandvik
Editrice de l’édition spéciale
North Dakota State University
Fargo, ND, USA

Cette édition spéciale se concentre sur le coté émotionnel de la vie organisationnelle, du fait que l’émotion est intrinsèque dans toutes les initiatives humaines.  Les articles et l’introduction indiquent qu’il y a sept thèmes dans la recherche émotionnelle et organisationnelle dans l’étude de la communication.  Premièrement, l’émotion est centrale aux connections humaines et dans les relations dans nos vies organisationnelles.  Deuxièmement, l’émotion a une fonction de signal inné qui indique quand quelque chose est désirable ou indésirable (et même dangereux).  Troisièmement, l’émotion influence et dans certain cas guide directement notre communication ainsi que d’autres comportements.  Quatrièmement, l’émotion communique, et dans certains cas, l&r squo;émotion est le message.  Cinquièmement, nous devrions mettre en valeur l’émotion des variables qui sont généralement sans émotion (tel que la satisfaction au travail) que nous utilisons typiquement pour évaluer et parler de l’émotion.  Sixièmement, l’émotion et la  rationalité ne peuvent pas être séparé.  Septièmement, l’émotion est une ressource forte dans la vie organisationnelle; nous pouvons utiliser l’émotion expressive ou répressive pour le bien ou le mal.  Dans cette double édition de EJC, les auteurs ont élargi certains de ces thèmes et ont introduit de nouvelles façons de considérer les émotions dans nos vies organisationnelles.

Dans l’article principal de Krone et de Dougherty, Reprendre possession d’un passé inachevé : du travail émotionnel à l’agence émotionnelle critique, les auteurs discutent qu’apprendre et appliquer les processus d’agence émotionnelle critique pouvant animer la résistance, encourager la voix, et servir de catalyse pour un changement social positif. Cet article montre la puissance de l’émotion dans la vie organisationnelle (thème 7). Dans l’article de Paul et de Riforgiate, “Prétendre d'être heureux,” “retourner au travail,” et “laisser tomber” : la justice traditionnelle et restauratrice pour comprendre les émotions au travail , les auteurs explorent différents moyens de s’occuper des émotions douloureuses du conflit. Ils ont comparé des enseignants dans deux écoles différentes dont une école utilise une approche traditionnelle et dont l’autre école utilise une approche revitalisante de justice pour faire face à un conflit émotionnel douloureux. Cet article illustre comment nous faisons face à  nos émotions, nous nous attachons aux autres (thème 1) et comment ce que l’on ressent suscite et guide nos actions ainsi que d’autres émotions (thème 3). L’article d’Anderson et de ses co-auteurs, Compartimenter nos émotions : examiner le rôle des émotions dans le lieu du travail sur les expériences du tutorat pour les femmes professeurs sous-représentées, explore les complexités des femmes membres de la faculté d’une école d’ingénieur où elles négocient un modèle de tutorat prédominant masculin (rationnel). Malgré le caractère émotionnel des relations du tutorat, les femmes dans l’académique dans des sujets non-traditionnels se ressentent obligées de refouler leurs émotions tout en promulguant leurs performances rationnelles. Leurs découvertes et les visions des auteurs réaffirment la nature essentiellement émotionnelle des relations, en particulier les relations de tutorat ; la pression rationnelle continue au travail d’apparaitre et de refouler les émotions (thème 6) ; et les façons dont les membres dominants dans une organisation pourraient utiliser l’émotion pour opprimer les gens qu’ils voient comme des gens de l'extérieur (thème 7).

La contribution de Scarduzio et de Malvini-Redden, Les résultats positifs des affichages émotionnels négatifs : une analyse émotionnelle à plusieurs niveaux dans le travail bureaucratique, indique que les interactions ironiques d’émotions positives et négatives dans deux systèmes bureaucratiques publiques bien règlementés que sont les salles d’audiences et la sécurité à l’aéroport. Les auteurs expliquent que la colère et la frustration, le sarcasme, et l’intimidation peuvent être contraire à l’intuition mais peut offrir des résultats positifs pour les gens et les organisations. Leur étude et discussion soulignent la fondation émotionnelle des relations humaines (thème 1) ; certaines façons avec lesquelles comment ce que nous ressentons provoque et guide nos actions (thème 3) ; et comment les membres organisationnels utilisent l’émotion (et même l’émotion négative) comme une ressource organisationnelle extrêmement puissante (thème 7). Jia, Li et Titsworth e xplorent dans leur article le domaine émotionnel de la communication étudiant-enseignant, Enseigner comme travail émotionnel : l’empathie de l’instructeur et les motifs des étudiants à communiquer en dehors de la classe. Ils examinent les raisons des étudiants de communiquer avec les instructeurs en dehors des cours afin de comprendre la perception des étudiants sur les soucis des enseignants et la réactivité émotionnelle (comme par exemple la capacité des enseignants d’écouter et de répondre de façon efficace à la détresse d’un étudiant). Les découvertes et les arguments des auteurs touchent au moins quatre thèmes – être en rapport avec l’émotion (thème 1), le lien entre l’émotion et l’action (thème 3), la puissance inhérente dans l’émotion (thème 7), et l’émotion qui souvent est un message en lui-même (thème 4).

L’article de Reznik et de Waite Miller, Les allergènes sociaux dans le lieu du travail : explorer les effets de la perception et de l’émotion sur la confrontation et le bien-être relationnel, examine un problème qui n’apparait que rarement dans la recherche sur la communication (comme par exemple les allergènes sociaux ou bien les choses sur les autres qui nous embêtent au travail). Leur étude examine les tendances des membres organisationnelles à confronter un collègue irritant en essayant de savoir s’ils perçoivent l’allergène comme intentionnel ou diriger personnellement. Le thème 3 l’emporte dans cet essai (comment nous nous ressentons suscite et guide nos actions), mais cet essai souligne aussi que l’émotion communique et c’est parfois le message que nous interpr&eacut e;tons (thème 4). Cette édition spéciale conclut avec l’article de Timothy Huffman, Les ruptures de la compassion : quand la reconnaissance, les rappels, et les réactions s'égarent. Son étude examine les interactions entre les jeunes adultes sans abri et les employés des organisations de service social qui essaient d’aider les jeunes adultes en examinant spécifiquement la compassion ratée des employés. Les résultats suggèrent que, malgré de bonnes intentions, les bénéficiaires de ces communications charitables par ces employés peuvent laisser les jeunes adultes à se sentir insultés, déshumanisés, et dé-légitimés. Tant de ce qui arrive dans les services organisationnels sont relationnels, cette étude exemplifie le thème 1 ; qui ind ique aussi à l’importance de notre capacité à lire des signaux émotionnels comme un signal important sur le fonctionnement organisationnel et humain (thème 2).

Les contributions sur cette édition et les thèmes que les écrivains utilisent sur les études organisationnelles qui relie à l’émotion, reçoivent une discussion bien plus importante dans l’édition qui apparait dans Des rires immenses et des pleurs intenses : des thèmes dans l’étude des émotions et des organisations, que j’ai co-écrite avec mes collègues Kelli Chromey et Emily Paskweitz. 

Notes de l’éditrice de l’édition spéciale :

Pamela Lutgen-Sandvik (Ph.D., Arizona State University) est maître de conférences adjoint  dans le Département de communication à North Dakota State University et directrice à NDSU de la recherche communicative et du centre de formation.  Sa recherche se concentre sur l’émotion au travail, aussi bien constructif que destructif.  Elle étudie l’intimidation au lieu du travail et les effets de l’émotion positive au travail.


Belly Laughs and Crying Your Eyes Out:
Themes in the Study of Emotions and Organizations

Pamela Lutgen-Sandvik
Kelli Chromey
Emily A. Paskewitz

North Dakota State University
Fargo, ND, USA

In this special issue, we focus on the emotional side of organizational life, arguing that emotion is inherent to any human enterprise. In this introduction, we outline some themes and reasons for studying emotion and organizing based on past communication research. Certainly, all such reviews are partial; however, we’ve tapped into seven thematic arguments communication scholars have put forth for the importance of understanding and attending to emotions and organizing. These thematic arguments are as follows: First, emotion is central to human connections and the relationships in our organizational lives. Second, emotion has a built-in signal function, telling organizational members when something is desirable or undesirable (and even dangerous). Third, emotion influences and in some cases directly guides communication and other behavior. Fourth, emotion communicates, and in many cases, the emotion is the message. Fifth, emotion needs to be brought out from behind relatively emotion-less variables (e.g., job satisfaction) researchers use to assess and talk about emotion. Sixth, emotionality and rationality cannot be separated. Seventh, emotion is a powerful resource in organizational life; organizational members can use emotion expression or suppression for good or ill. For the most part, people consider emotions when working with others toward organizational goals at our jobs, but the ideas likewise apply to other organizational settings.

Des rires immenses et des pleurs intenses : des thèmes dans l’étude des émotions et des organisations : Abrégé : Dans cette édition spéciale, nous nous concentrons sur le côté émotionnel de la vie organisationnelle dont nous maintenons que l’émotion est intrinsèque à toutes les entreprises humaines.  Dans cette introduction, nous donnons un aperçu de certains thèmes et des raisons pour étudier l’émotion et l’organisation basées sur la recherche communicative dans le passé.  Certainement, toutes ces analyses sont partiales ; cependant, nous avons touché à sept thèmes de discussions que les érudits de la communication ont fait avancer pour comprendre l’importance de la compréhension et de l’attention des émotions et des organisations.  Ces thèmes sont comme suit : premièrement, l’émotion est centrale aux connexions humaines et aux relations dans nos vies organisationnelles.   Deuxièmement, l’émotion a une fonction qui dit aux membres organisationnels que quelque chose est désirable ou non-désirable (et même dangereux).  Troisièmement, l’émotion influence et, dans certain cas, guide directement la communication et d’autres comportements.  Quatrièmement, l’émotion communique et, dans beaucoup de cas, l’émotion est le message.  Cinquièmement, nous devrions mettre en valeur l’émotion des variables qui sont généralement sans émotion (tel que la satisfaction au travail) que nous utilisons typiquement pour évaluer et parler de l’émotion.  Sixièmement, l’émotion et la  rationalité ne peuvent pas être séparées.  Septièmement, l’émotion est une ressource forte dans la vie organisationnelle ; nous pouvons utiliser l’émotion expressive ou le refoulement pour le bien ou le mal.  Dans la plupart des cas, nous considérons les émotions avec d’autres gens vers des buts organisationnels dans nos emplois, mais les idées aussi s’appliquent dans d’autres cadres organisationnels.


Re-claiming an Unfinished Past:
From Emotional Labor to Critical Emotional Agency

Kathleen J. Krone
University of Nebraska-Lincoln
Lincoln, NE, USA

Debbie S. Dougherty
University of Missouri
Columbia, MO, USA

Abstract: In this essay we attempt to re-gain the critical edge of research on emotions and organizations by proposing the concept of critical emotional agency. Critical emotional agency involves making sense of emotional experiences in ways that empower resistance, cultivate the capacity for self-determination and strengthen the ability to act “otherwise” within and beyond the margins of formal organizations. The essay further develops the conceptual contours of critical emotional agency by drawing upon existing data sources related to gendered and class-based sensemaking, feminist alliance building across differences and planned community participation processes. We go on to offer a lived case illustration of critical emotional agency and conclude by arguing that processes of critical emotional agency help animate cycles of resistance and power productive of social change.

Reprendre possession d’un passé inachevé : du travail émotionnel à l’agence émotionnelle critique : Abrégé : Dans cet essai, nous essayons de reprendre l’avantage critique de la recherche sur les émotions et les organisations dont on propose le concept d’une “agence émotionnel critique”. L’agence émotionnel critique exige que nous trouvions une façon de rendre les expériences émotionnelles qui valorise la résistance, cultive la capacité pour l’autonomie, et renforce la capacité d’agir “sinon” à l’intérieur mais aussi à l’extérieur des marges d’organisations rationnelles.  Cet essai développe en plus les contours conceptuels d’une agence émotionnelle critique en se basant sur des sources de donn&eacu te;es existantes des études de genres et de classes sociales, de l’alliance féministe qui se construit à travers les différences et les processus de participation des communautés planifiées.  Nous allons jusqu’à offrir un exemple réalisé d’une “agence émotionnelle critique” et nous concluons que les processus d’agence émotionnelle critique aide à animer les cycles de résistance et alimente le changement social productif.


“Putting on a Happy Face,” “Getting Back to Work,” and “Letting It Go”:
Traditional and Restorative Justice Understandings of Emotions at Work

Gregory D. Paul
Sarah E. Riforgiate

Kansas State University
Manhattan, KS, USA

Abstract: Coping with the emotional consequences of hurtful situations in the workplace can be problematic for organizational members. Traditional approaches depending on rationality and professionalism come with expectations that employees suppress or minimize emotion by focusing on their work and maintaining composure. However, an alternative approach to justice – restorative justice – is gaining notice in organizational scholarship and appears to offer a different approach to managing painful situations and their associated emotions. This study examines how the experience and management of emotion following hurtful events are connected with traditional and restorative principles in a workplace setting. The results of the study offer insight into the consequences of restorative justice in organizational life.

“Prétendre d'être heureux,” “retourner au travail,” et “laisser tomber” : la justice traditionnelle et restauratrice pour comprendre les émotions au travail : Abrégé : Affronter les conséquences émotionnelles de situations douloureuses au travail peut être problématique pour des membres d’organisation.  Les approches traditionnelles dépendent sur la rationalité et le professionnalisme qui viennent avec des espoirs que les employés vont réprimer ou minimiser l’émotion en se concentrant sur leur travail et à maintenir leur sang-froid.  Cependant, une approche alternative à la justice - la justice revitalisante - est en train de gagner de l’attention dans les organisations érudites et à l’air d’offrir une approche différente pour s’occ uper des situations douloureuses et de leurs émotions liées.  Cette étude examine comment l’expérience et la gestion d’émotion qui suit des événements blessants sont liées avec les principes réparateurs et traditionnels dans un cadre de lieu du travail.  Les résultats de cette étude offrent un aperçu dans la conséquence de la justice revitalisante dans la vie organisationnelle.


Compartmentalizing Feelings:
Examining the Role of Workplace Emotions in the Mentoring Experiences of Underrepresented Women Faculty

Lindsey B. Anderson
University of Maryland
College Park, MD, USA

Ziyu LongZiyu Long
Colorado State

Fort Collins, CO, USA

Patrice M. Buzzanell
Klod Kokini
Jennifer C. Batra
Robyn F. Wilson

Purdue University
West Lafayette, IN, USA

Abstract: Mentoring is a fundamental organizational process that people enact through communication: one that relies on emotion to maintain the professional relationship. This article explores underrepresented women faculty members’ mentoring relationships and corresponding emotions in a College of Engineering (CoE) at a large Midwestern university. Based on in-depth interviews with female engineering faculty members, the case study demonstrates how emotions underscore women’s mentoring experiences in academe. Their personal stories demonstrate how the development of mentoring relationships is compartmentalized (emotions and containment) and simultaneously built on trust (emotions and integration). Stories also illustrate how these women see the mentoring processes, emotions, and reproduction of traditional mentoring system as facilitating their professional growth. Our findings contribute to better understanding women’s mentoring in ac ademe and the communicative constructions of mentorship, emotions, and resilience. From the women’s narratives of their everyday mentoring experiences, we draw theoretical implications concerning the restriction and expansion of emotional boundaries in professional mentoring relationships and provide pragmatic recommendations for improving academic mentoring practices.

Compartimenter nos émotions : examiner le rôle des émotions dans le lieu du travail sur les expériences du tutorat pour les femmes professeurs sous-représentées : Abrégé : Le tutorat est un processus organisationnel fondamental que les gens mettent en place à travers la communication : un dont le besoin dépend d’émotion pour maintenir la relation professionnelle. Cet article examine les femmes professeurs sous-représentées dans leurs relations au tutorat et dans leurs émotions correspondantes dans une école d’ingénieur dans une grande université du mid-ouest. En utilisant des interviews détaillées avec des membres de la faculté de femmes ingénieurs, cette étude démontre comment les émotions soulignent les expériences du tutorat des femmes en académ ie. Leurs histoires personnelles démontrent comment le développement des relations du tutorat est compartimenté (l’émotion et l’endiguement) et qui est simultanément basé sur la confiance (l’émotion et l’intégration). Les histoires illustrent aussi comment ces femmes voient les processus du tutorat, les émotions, et la reproduction d’un système de tutorat traditionnel en favorisant leurs croissances professionnelles. Nos découvertes contribuent à mieux comprendre le tutorat des femmes en académie et les constructions du tutorat communicatif, les émotions, et la résistance. De la part de la narration des femmes sur leurs expériences journalières du tutorat, nous esquissons des implications théoriques sur la restriction et l’expansion des limites émotionnelles dans les relations du tutorat professionnel et nous offrons des recommandations pragmatiques sur la façon d’améliorer les pratiques du tutorat académique.


The Positive Outcomes of Negative Emotional Displays:
A Multi-Level Analysis of Emotion in Bureaucratic Work

Jennifer A. Scarduzio
University of Kentucky
Lexington, KY, USA

Shawna Malvini Redden
California State University, Chico
Chico, CA, USA

Abstract: Organizational scholarship often frames negative emotional displays as disruptive and problematic. However, in certain organizational contexts, for instance, bureaucratic institutions, negative emotions may be particularly useful. Bureaucratic work involves high levels of tedium, quantitative and qualitative overload, and a lack of autonomy for employees that can contribute to feelings of frustration. This study combines participant observation and interviews to explore negative emotional displays in two highly regulated public bureaucratic systems—municipal courtrooms and airport security checkpoints. We explain how employee negative emotional displays including the use of anger, frustration, sarcasm, and intimidation can have counterintuitive, yet positive, outcomes at individual, dyad or team, and organizational levels. Our findings reveal that negative emotional displays can help employees engage in role-distancing behaviors, generate collaboration and camaraderie among coworkers, and actually facilitate critical organizational processes. Theoretically, we discuss the importance of subtlety when employing negative emotional displays in bureaucratic work environments as well as several considerations for practice.

Les résultats positifs des affichages émotionnels négatifs : une analyse émotionnelle à plusieurs niveaux dans le travail bureaucratique : Abrégé : Les organisations érudites souvent encadrent les affichages émotionnels négatifs comme perturbateurs et problématiques.  Cependant, dans certains contextes organisationnels comme par exemple les institutions bureaucratiques, les émotions négatives peuvent être particulièrement utiles.  Le travail bureaucratique implique un degré élevé d’ennui, une surcharge quantitative et qualitative, et un manque d’autonomie pour les employés peuvent contribuer à des sentiments de frustration.  Cette étude met ensemble les observations et les interviews des participants à explorer les affichages émotionnels n&ea cute;gatifs dans deux systèmes bureaucratiques publiques bien réglementé - les salles d’audience et la sécurité des postes de contrôle à l’aéroport.  Nous expliquons comment les affichages émotionnels négatifs des employés y compris l’utilisation de la colère, de la frustration, du sarcasme, et de l’intimidation peuvent avoir des conséquences contre-intuitives, bien que positives, de résultats aux individuels, aux dyades ou aux équipes, et à différents niveaux de l’organisation.  Nos résultats révèlent que les affichages émotionnels négatifs peuvent aider les employés à s’engager dans des rôles créants une distance dans les comportements, a générer une collaboration et une camaraderie entre collègues, et en fait faciliter les processu s organisationnels critiques.  Théoriquement, nous discutons de l’importance de la subtilité quand nous utilisons des affichages émotionnels négatifs dans les environnements du travail bureaucratique ainsi que dans plusieurs considérations pratiques.


Teaching as Emotional Work:
Instructor’s Empathy and Students’ Motives to Communicate out of Class

Moyi Jia
Monmouth University
West Long Branch, NJ, USA

Li Li
University of Wyoming
Laramie, WY, USA

Scott Titsworth
Ohio University
Athens, OH, USA

Abstract: Communication between teachers and students outside of traditional classroom boundaries can be a critical aspect of students’ learning processes. Although outside-class communication can help students with substantive academic questions, it also presents opportunities for both teachers and students to add emotional dimensions to their relationships. Drawing on perspectives of emotionality, we explore relationships between students’ perceptions of their teachers’ empathic concern, emotional contagion, and responsiveness (ability to listen and respond effectively to someone in distress), and the relationships among these and students’ motives for communicating with instructors outside of class. We found that teachers’ empathic concern was positively related, and emotional contagion negatively related, to responsiveness. Additionally, responsiveness fully mediated the relationship between empathic concern, emotional co ntagion, and several of the students’ motives for communicating with their instructors outside of class.

Enseigner comme travail émotionnel : l’empathie de l’instructeur et les motifs des étudiants à communiquer en dehors de la classe  : Abrégé : La communication entre les enseignants et les étudiants en dehors des limites d’une classe traditionnelle peut être un aspect critique des processus d’apprentissages des étudiants. Bien que la communication à l’extérieur de la classe puisse aider les étudiants avec des questions académiques substantives, de plus elle offre des opportunités pour les enseignants et les étudiants d’accroître des dimensions émotionnelles à leurs relations. En tirant profit des perspectives sur l’émotion, nous explorons les relations entre les perceptions des étudiants sur les soucis emphatiques de leurs enseignants, la contagion émotionnelle, et l a réactivité (la capacité d’écouter et de répondre efficacement à quelqu’un en détresse), et les relations entre ces raisons et les motifs des étudiants pour communiquer avec les enseignants en dehors de la classe. Nous avons trouvé que le souci emphatique des enseignants était en relation positive, et que la contagion émotionnelle était en relation négative à la réactivité. De plus, la réactivité a complètement arbitrée des relations entre le souci emphatique, la contagion émotionnelle, et plusieurs motivations des étudiants de communiquer avec leurs enseignants en dehors de la classe.


Social Allergens in the Workplace:
Exploring the Effect of Perception and Emotion on Frequency of Confrontation and Relational Well-Being

Rachel M. Reznik
Courtney Waite Miller

Elmhurst College
Elmhurst, IL, USA

Abstract: Social allergens are characteristics or behaviors that irritate another person. This study focuses on the impact of negative emotions and perceptions of social allergens on people’s confrontations with others and on their relational well-being. Findings suggest that feeling angry about a co-worker’s allergenic behavior mediated the relationship between perceiving the allergen as both intentional and personally directed and the frequency of confronting one’s coworker. Both anger and disgust mediated the relationship between intentionality and personal directedness of the allergen and relational well-being.  This indicates that individuals’ perceptions of the allergen influence their negative emotions, which then influence communication behaviors and feelings about co-workers.

Les allergènes sociaux dans le lieu du travail : explorer les effets de la perception et de l’émotion sur la confrontation et le bien-être relationnel : Abrégé : Les allergènes sociaux sont des caractéristiques ou des comportements qui irritent une autre personne.  Cette étude se concentre sur les impacts des émotions négatives et des perceptions des allergènes sociaux sur les confrontations des gens sur d’autres et leurs bien-êtres relationnels.  Les conclusions suggèrent que de se sentir en colère envers le comportement allergène d’un collègue servait de médiateur dans le lien entre percevoir l'allergène à la fois comme intentionnel et personnellement dirigé et la fréquence de la confrontation avec son collègue.  A la fois la colère et le dégo&uc irc;t ont servi de médiateur sur la relation entre l’intention et le dirigé personnel de l'allergène et du bien-être relationnel.  Cela indique que la perception des individus de l'allergène influence leurs émotions négatives, ce qui influence les comportements de communication et les sentiments des collègues.


Ruptures in Compassion:
When Recognizing, Relating, and Reacting Go Astray

Timothy Huffman
Saint Louis University
St Louis, MO, USA

Abstract: Compassionate communication can fail. Scholars have called for a move away from understanding compassion as an individual emotional experience and toward a dynamic, interactional view. This study draws on the experience of homeless young adults in nonprofit organizations and their interactions with staff in order to better understand the compassionate dynamics of communication in this setting. I argue that compassion can rupture when staff members use the compassionate processes of recognizing, relating, and reacting, but the young adults interpret the communication as lacking compassion. Usually compassion ruptured because the recipient of well-meaning interaction felt insulted, dehumanized, or delegitimized by the “caring” communication of another.

Les ruptures de la compassion : quand la reconnaissance, les rapports, et les réactions s'égarent : Abrégé : La communication compatissante peut avoir des ratées. Les érudits ont demandé de s'éloigner de la compréhension de la compassion comme expérience émotionnelle individuelle vers une vision inter-actionnelle et dynamique. Cette étude se base sur l’expérience de jeunes adultes sans-abri dans des organisations caritatives et de leurs interactions avec les employés afin de mieux comprendre les dynamiques de communications compatissantes dans ce cadre. Je maintiens que la compassion peut se rompre quand les membres du personnel utilisent les processus de la compassion pour reconnaître, avoir un rapport, et réagir, mais les jeunes adultes interprètent la communication comme une manque de compassion. La compassion s&rsqu o;est généralement rompue à cause du fait que les bénéficiaires des interactions bien intentionnées se sont ressentis insultés, déshumanisés, ou bien dé-légitimés par la communication « attentionnée » d’un autre.



Copyright 2015 Communication Institute for Online Scholarship, Inc.

This file may not be publicly distributed or reproduced without written permission of
the Communication Institute for Online Scholarship,
P.O. Box 57, Rotterdam Jct., NY 12150 USA (phone: 518-887-2443).