Communication Institute for Online Scholarship
Communication Institute for Online
Scholarship Continous online service and innovation
since 1986
Site index
 
ComAbstracts Visual Communication Concept Explorer Tables of Contents Electronic Journal of Communication ComVista

EJC 26(3 & 4): Impact of Technology on Interpersonal Relationships / L’impact de la technologie dans les relations interpersonnelles
Electronic Journal of Communication

Volume 26 Numbers 3 & 4, 2016

Impact of Technology on Interpersonal Relationships /
L'impact de la technologie dans les relations interpersonnelles

With Editors / Avec éditrices :

Teresa Heinz Housel
The Open Polytechnic of New Zealand
Lower Hutt, NZ

Vickie L. Harvey
California State University, Stanislaus
Turlock, CA, USA


Editor's Introduction: Impact of Technology on Interpersonal Relationships  L’introduction des éditrices : L'impact de la technologie dans les relations interpersonnelles

Teresa Heinz Housel
The Open Polytechnic of New Zealand
Lower Hutt, NZ

Vickie L. Harvey
California State University, Stanislaus
Turlock, CA, USA

Fighting Electronically: Long-Distance Romantic Couples’ Conflict Management Over Mediated Communication / Se battre électroniquement: la gestion du conflit des couples romantiques à longue distance sur la communication favorisée

Sun Kyong Lee
Megan A. Bassick
Stacie Wilson Mumpower

University of Oklahoma
Norman, OK, USA

Using Facebook and Skype for Marital Communication During American Military Deployment: A Uses and Gratifications Perspective / Utilisation de Facebook et Skype pour les communications conjugales pendant le déploiement des militaires américains: une perspective d'utilisations et de gratifications

Margaret C. Stewart
University of North Florida
Jacksonville, FL, USA

Laurie A. Grosik
Saint Francis University
Loretto, PA, USA

Multimodal Communication, Idealization, and Relational Quality in College Students' Parental Relationships: A Model of Partner Idealization in Ongoing Relationships / La communication multimodale, l'idéalisation, et la qualité relationnelle dans les relations entre parents et étudiants: un modèle d'idéalisation de partenaires dans des relations continues\s

Erin M. Sumner
Trinity University
San Antonio, TX, USA

Artemio Ramirez Jr.
University of South Florida
Tampa, FL, USA

Transgender Transitioning: The Influence of Virtual on Physical Identities / La transition des transgenres: l'influence du virtuel sur les identités physique

Sara Green-Hamann
John C. Sherblom

University of Maine
Orono, ME, USA

The Impact of Smartphone Educational Use on Student Connectedness and Out-of-Class Involvement / L'impact de l'utilisation éducationnelle du smartphone sur la connexité des étudiants et de leurs l'engagements hors des classes

Xun (Sunny) Liu
Nancy F. Burroughs
Qing Tian
Vickie L. Harvey
California State University, Stanislaus
Turlock, CA, USA

Teresa Heinz Housel
Open Polytechnic of New Zealand
Wellingon, NZ

 


Editor's Introduction:
Impact of Technology on Interpersonal Relationships

Teresa Heinz Housel
The Open Polytechnic of New Zealand
Lower Hutt, NZ

Vickie L. Harvey
California State University, Stanislaus
Turlock, CA, USA

This issue of the Electronic Journal of Communication is embedded in the context of scholars’ increasing attention to how technology affects interpersonal relationships through the ways people use and perceive technology, and interact through it.

Over the past two decades, scholars have developed increasingly nuanced understanding of how technology impacts everyday life. Public concerns about technology’s impact on work and community have existed since the Industrial Revolution (Wellman, 1997). During the 1980s-early 2000s, dystopian and utopian literature presented a pessimistic or optimistic picture of technology’s impact on society. Dystopianism focuses on technology’s alienating capability (Kling, 1996; Winters, 1998). Utopian discourses historically focus on technology’s democratizing and communitarian aspects (McOmber, 1999). For instance, studies of Freenets in the 1980s discussed how they supported interest groups’ advocacy (Milio, 1996).

Research more recently blurs the dystopian-utopian dichotomy by examining how people’s everyday interactions with technology are complex and frequently contradictory. Although a sizeable literature examines technology’s celebratory aspects, such as how online communities facilitate social activism and performances of identity (Ali & Fahmy, 2013; Bennett, 2014; Graham, Jackson & Wright, 2016; Karamat & Farooq, 2016), some scholars point out how technology can bring about social and political inequality and physical violence (Andreassen & Dyb, 2010; Tawfik, Reeves & Stich, 2016; Vasilescu, Capiluppi & Serebrenik, 2014). Technology can even diminish human capacity for immersive thinking. For example, Carr (2008, 2010) asserts that the Internet’s qualities of efficiency and immediacy are changing how readers engage with texts and process information. Instead of becoming deeply immersed in long prose, readers scan Web pages for small nuggets of information. As a result, Carr (2008) argues, “Our ability to interpret text, to make the rich mental connections that form when we read deeply and without distraction, remains largely disengaged.”

Even as critics such as Carr (2010) cautiously approach the Internet’s impact on human engagement, organisations embrace technology to deliver their services because of its convenience, affordability, and increased capabilities. To this end, Bunch (2016) examines the proliferation of online university degree programs. These programs make learning and degrees more accessible, but researchers scrutinize the programs’ role as a means of successful learning. For instance, Artino (2007) found that determined variables influence student satisfaction when they complete courses online. Top factors that influence student satisfaction when they learn online are importance of interaction, Internet self-efficacy, and self-regulated learning (Bandura, 1988).

Almost two decades later, Bunch (2016) argues that these three interaction types continue to be significantly correlated with student satisfaction. Learner-instructor interaction and learner-content interaction significantly contribute to student satisfaction, while learner-learner interaction is a poor predictor of student satisfaction. This finding suggests that effective online learning requires human interaction. As this issue’s essays similarly point out, technology cannot be divorced from human interaction. People’s perceptions, uses, and interactions through technology are inevitably connected to their interpersonal relationships.

Technology’s Complex Intersections with Interpersonal Relationships

The essays examine the intersections between technology and different aspects of interpersonal relationships. We broadly define technology to include social media and personal communications technologies such as cell phones, tablet computers, personal music players, and other devices.

Three essays analyse how different communication channels both reflect and shape interpersonal relationships. Lee, Bassick, and Mumpower found that specific communication channels such as email and phone calls are associated with different conflict styles in long-distance romantic relationships (LDR). LDR partners tend to choose channels for initiating conflicts based on their perceptions of media affordances such as cue multiplicity, synchronicity, and mobility.

Although people use technology to manage conflict, it would be erroneous to suggest that technology has a deterministic impact on relationships. Two other essays examine how people use technologies to manage geographical distance in relationships. Stewart and Grosik examine how military families use new media such as Facebook and Skype to maintain relationships and gather information. Because loved ones are physically separated, they selectively choose different media for communication based on how the channels gratify needs for relational maintenance and information-seeking through monitoring and surveillance.

Technology can help maintain familial relationships when a child leaves the home. Summer and Ramirez tested the partner idealization component of the hyperpersonal perspective on college students and parents. They found that the frequency of mediated communication was positively related to idealization and relational quality. Face-to-face communication frequency was inversely related to idealization (positive affect thinking), but not directly related to relational quality.

Several essays examine technology’s potentially transformative impacts on personal identity and relationships. Green-Hamann and Sherblom look at how Second Life gives people a space where they can construct gender identity. The ability to correctly express one’s gender identity is imperative to being who we are.For people who perform gender in online interaction, the ease of online gender identity expressions extends beyond social media into face-to-face interactions.

Although many scholars criticize technology’s presence in the classroom, Liu, Burroughs, Tian, Harvey, and Housel argue that smartphones can positively impact learning and classroom communities. For example, instructors can write mobile device policies collaboratively with students and even build smartphones into class discussions to improve student accountability and sense of classroom community.

As Liu et al. point out, whether educators like it or not, smartphones are an essential component of college students’ “mobile culture” (Caron & Caronia, 2007). These essays collectively extend this reasoning by arguing that technologies are now part of many people’s interpersonal relationships. The essays thus help us further understand the complex interconnections between technology and relationships.

Notes of thanks

We thank our reviewers for their constructive and insightful comments. We appreciate you taking time to read papers despite your busy schedules.
Our reviewers included: Dr. Isolde Anderson (Hope College), Dr. Christopher Claus (California State University Stanislaus), Dr. Bruce Findlay (Swinburne University of Technology, Australia), Dr. Antonio Garcia-Gomez (Universidad de Alcalá, Spain), Dr. Erika Kirby (Creighton University), Dr. Jimmie Manning (Northern Illinois University), Dr. Shaheed N. Mohammed (Pennsylvania State University Altoona), Dr. Bolanle Olaniran (Texas Tech University), Jennifer Schon (University of Kansas), Dr. Philippa Smith (Auckland University of Technology, New Zealand), Dr. Kim Trager-Bohley (Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis), and Dr. Sonja Utz (Knowledge Media Research Center and University of Tübingen, Germany).

Thank you to Teresa Harrison, EJC’s managing editor, who kept the project running smoothly.

Issue Co-Editors:
Dr. Teresa Heinz Housel, Open Polytechnic of New Zealand
Dr. Vickie L. Harvey, California State University Stanislaus

References

Ali, S. R., & Fahmy, S. (2013). Gatekeeping and citizen journalism: The use of social media during the recent uprisings in Iran, Egypt, and Libya. Media, War and Conflict, 6(1), 55-69. doi: 10.1177/1750635212469906

Andreassen, H. K., & Dyb, K. (2010). Differences and inequalities in health. Information, Communication & Society, 13(7), 956-975. doi: 10.1080/1369118X.2010.499953

Artino, A. R. (2007). Online military training: Using a social cognitive view of motivation and self-regulation to understand students’ satisfaction, perceived learning, and choice. Quarterly Review of Distance Education, 8(3), 191-202. Retrieved from http://eric.ed.gov/?id=EJ875059

Bandura, A. (1988). Self-regulation of motivation and action through goal systems. In V. Hamilton, G. H. Bower, & N. H. Frijda (Eds.), Cognitive perspectives on emotion and motivation (pp. 37-61). Dordrecht, The Netherlands: Kluwer Academic. doi: 10.1007/978-94-009-2792-6_2

Bennett, L. (2014). ‘If we stick together we can do anything’: Lady Gaga fandom, philanthropy and activism through social media. Celebrity Studies, 5(1-2), 138-152. doi: 10.1080/19392397.2013.813778

Bunch, S. (2016). Experiences of students with specific learning disorder (including ADHD) in online college degree programs: A phenomenological study (Doctoral dissertation). Liberty University, Lynchburg, VA, 2016. Retrieved from http://digitalcommons.liberty.edu/doctoral/1190

Caron, A.H., & Caronia, L. (2007). Moving cultures: Mobile communication in everyday life. McGill-Queens University Press. Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/j.ctt80wpd

Carr, N. G. (2008, July/August). Is Google making us stupid? The Atlantic..Retrieved from http://www.theatlantic.com/magazine/archive/2008/07/is-google-making-us-stupid/306868/

Carr, N. G. (2010). The shallows: What the Internet is doing to our brains. New York: W.W. Norton.

Graham, T., Jackson, D., & Wright, S. (2016). ‘We need to get together and make ourselves heard’: Everyday online spaces as incubators of political action. Information, Communication & Society, 19(10), 1373-1389. doi: 10.1080/1369118X.2015.1094113

Karamat, A., & Farooq, A. (2016). Emerging role of social media in political activism: Perceptions and practices. South Asian Studies, 31(1), 381-396. Retrieved from http://pu.edu.pk/images/journal/csas/PDF/25%20Ayesha%20Karamat_v31_no1_jan-jun2016.pdf

Kling, R. (1996). Hopes and horrors: Technological utopianism and anti-utopianism in narratives of computerization. In R. Kling (Ed.), Communication and controversy (2nd ed., pp. 40-58). San Diego, CA: Academic.

McOmber, J. B. (1999). Technology autonomy and three definitions of technology. Journal of Communications, 49(3), 137-153. doi: 10.1111/j.1460-2466.1999.tb02809.x

Milio, N. (1996). Engines of empowerment. Chicago, IL: Health Administration.

Tawfik, A.A., Reeves, T.D., & Stich, A. (2016). Intended and unintended consequences of educational technology on social inequality. TechTrends, 1-8. doi: 10.1007/s11528-016-0109-5

Vasilescu, B., Capiluppi, A., & Serebrenik, A. (2014). Gender, representation and online participation: A quantitative study. Interacting with Computers, 26(5), 488-511. doi: 10.1093/iwc/iwt047

Wellman, B. (1997). The road to utopia and dystopia on the information highway? Contemporary Sociology, 26(4), 445-449. Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2655085

Winters, P. A. (1998). Information revolution: Opposing viewpoints. San Diego, CA: Greenhaven.


L’introduction des éditrices :
L'impact de la technologie dans les relations interpersonnelles

Teresa Heinz Housel
The Open Polytechnic of New Zealand
Lower Hutt, NZ

Vickie L. Harvey
California State University, Stanislaus
Turlock, CA, USA

Cette étude du Journal électronique de communication est intégré dans le contexte de cette attention accroissante des experts dont la façon des relations interpersonnelles touchent le moyen et dont les gens utilisent et ressentent la technologie et agissent à travers elle. Pendant ces deux dernières décennies, les experts ont développé de plus en plus de compréhensions nuancées sur la façon dont la technologie crée un impact dans notre vie quotidienne. Les soucis du publique sur l'impact de la technologie sur le travail et la communauté existent depuis la révolution industrielle (Wellman, 1997). Pendant les années 1980 jusqu'au début des années 2000, les littératures dystopiques et utopiques ont présentés une image optimiste ou pessimiste sur l'impact de la technologie dans la société. Le dystopyanisme se concentre sur la capacité éloignante de la technologie (Kling, 1996; Winters, 1998). Les discours utopiques se concentrent historiquement sur les aspects technologiques démocratisants et comminatoires (McOmber, 1999). Par exemple, des études de Freenets dans les années 1980 discutaient comment ils aidaient la promotion des groupes d'intérêts (Milio, 1996).

Les recherches ont plus récemment brouillé la dichotomie dystopienne et utopienne en examinant comment les interactions journalières des gens avec la technologie sont complexes et souvent contradictoires. Bien qu'une grande partie de la littérature examine les aspects de célébration de la technologie comme par exemple les communautés en ligne qui facilitent l'activisme social et les performances de l'identité (Ali & Fahmy, 2013; Bennett, 2014; Graham, Jackson & Wright, 2016; Karamat & Farooq, 2016), certains experts montrent comment la technologie peut entraîner une inégalité sociale et politique et une violence physique (Tawfik, Reeves & Stich, 2016; Andreassen & Dyb, 2010; Vasilescu, Capiluppi & Serebrenik, 2014). La technologie peut même diminuer la capacité de l'être humain à une pensée immersive. Par exemple, Carr (2008, 2010) affirme que les qualités d'efficacités et d'immédiat de internet changent la façon dont les lecteurs s'engagent avec les textes et retiennent l'information. Plutôt que de devenir immergé dans de longues proses, les lecteurs parcourent les pages web pour de petits trésors d'information. Comme résultat, Carr (2008) maintien que, "notre capacité d'interpréter le texte, de faire des connections mentales importantes qui forment ce que nous lisons de façon profonde et sans distraction, reste largement désintéressé."

Mêmes les critiques tels que Carr (2010) qui avec de grandes attentions aborde l'impact de internet sur l'engagement humain, les organisations saisissent la technologie pour donner à livrer des services grâce à son avantage, son accessibilité, et sa capacité accrue. A cette fin, Bunch (2016) examine la prolifération des diplômes programmes universitaires en ligne. Ces programmes rendent l'apprentissage et les diplômes plus accessible, mais les chercheurs examinent le rôle des programmes comme moyen d'apprentissage performant. Par exemple, Artino (2007) a trouvé que des variables déterminées influencent la satisfaction des étudiants quand ils finissent leurs cours en ligne. Des raisons très importantes qui ont influencé la satisfaction des étudiants quand ils apprennent en ligne son t les importances d'interactions, d'efficacité personnelle sur internet, et l'apprentissage autoréglementée (Bandura, 1988).

Presque 20 ans plus tard, Bunch (2016) maintien que ces trois genres d'interactions continuent d'être corrélé de façon importante avec la satisfaction des étudiants. L'interaction entre l'instructeur et l'élève et l'interaction entre le contenu et l'élève contribuent de façon significative à la satisfaction des étudiants, alors que l'interaction d’ élève à élève est un mauvais prédicateur de la satisfaction des élèves. Comme les essais de cette édition montre, la technologie ne peut pas être séparer de l'interaction humaine. Les perceptions des gens, leurs utilisations, et leurs interactions à travers la technologie sont inévitablement connecter à leurs relations interpersonnelles.

Les intersections complexes de la technologie sur les relations interpersonnelles

Les essais examinent les intersections entre la technologie et différents aspects des relations interpersonnelles. Nous définissons la technologie largement afin d’inclure les médias sociaux et les communications personnelles technologiques tels que les téléphones portables, les tablettes d'ordinateurs, les joueurs personnels de musique, ainsi que d'autres appareils.

Trois essais analysent comment les communications différentes acheminent, reflètent, et forment les relations interpersonnelles. Lee, Bassick, et Mumpower ont trouvé que des moyens spécifiques de communication tels que les courriers électroniques et les coups de fils sont associés avec des styles de conflits différents dans des relations romantiques à longue distance. Les partenaires dans des relations romantiques à longue distance ont tendance à choisir des moyens pour initier les conflits basé sur leurs perceptions des possibilités médiatiques tels la multiplicité, la synchronicité, et la mobilité.

Bien que les gens utilisent la technologie pour gérer le conflit, il serait erroné de suggérer que la technologie a un impact déterministe sur les relations. Deux autres essais examinent comment les gens utilisent les technologies pour gérer les distances géographiques dans les relations. Stewart et Grosik examinent comment les familles militaires utilisent les nouveaux médias tels que Facebook et Skype pour maintenir des relations et recueillir des informations. Parce que ceux qui nous sont proches sont séparés physiquement, ils choisissent sélectivement des médias différents pour la communication basée sur comment les voies satisfasses nos besoins pour un entretien relationnel et notre recherche d'information à travers le contrôle et la surveillance.

La technologie peut nous aider à maintenir des relations familiales quand un enfant quitte la maison. Summer et Ramirez ont tester l'idéalisation du partenaire d'une perspective hyper personnelle sur les étudiants universitaires et les parents. Ils ont trouvé que la fréquence d'une communication arbitrée était en relation positive à l'idéalisation et à la qualité relationnelle. La fréquence de communication en face à face était inversement reliée à l'idéalisation (le positif a un effet sur la pensée), mais pas directement relié à la qualité relationnelle.

Plusieurs essais examinent les impacts potentiels de transformation de la technologie sur l'identité personnelle et les relations. Green-Hamann et Sherblom regardent comment Second Life donne aux gens un espace où ils peuvent construire une identité de genre. La possibilité d'exprimer librement son identité de genre est impératif pour être qui nous sommes. Pour les gens qui pratiquent le genre dans des interactions en ligne, la facilité des expressions d'identité de genre en ligne s'étend au delà du média social aux interactions du face à face.

Bien que beaucoup d'experts critiquent la présence de la technologie dans la classe, Liu, Burroughs, Tian, Harvey, et Housel argumentent que les téléphones portables peuvent avoir un impact positif sur l'apprentissage et dans les communautés des salles de classe. Par exemple, les enseignants peuvent écrire des règles sur des appareils mobiles en collaboration avec des étudiants et même construire des smartphones dans des discussions en classe afin d'améliorer la responsabilité des étudiants et leurs sentiments de faire partir d'une communauté de salle de classe.

Comme Liu et compagnie le montre - que les enseignants l'aiment ou pas, les smartphones sont des aspects essentiels d'une "culture mobile" (Caron & Caronia, 2007) des étudiants universitaires. Collectivement, ces essais rallonge ce processus de réflexion en argumentant que les technologies font maintenant partie des relations interpersonnelles de beaucoup de gens. Ces essais nous aident encore à mieux comprendre les interconnexions complexes entre la technologie et les relations.

Les notes de remerciement

Nous remercions nos critiques pour leurs commentaires fructueux et judicieux. Nous apprécions le temps qu’ils ont pris pour lire les articles malgré leur emploi du temps chargé.
Nos critiques inclus: Dr. Isolde Anderson (Hope College), Dr. Christopher Claus (California State University Stanislaus), Dr. Bruce Findlay (Swinburne University of Technology, Australia), Dr. Antonio Garcia-Gomez (Universidad de Alcalá, Spain), Dr. Erika Kirby (Creighton University), Dr. Jimmie Manning (Northern Illinois University), Dr. Shaheed N. Mohammed (Pennsylvania State University Altoona), Dr. Bolanle Olaniran (Texas Tech University), Jennifer Schon (University of Kansas), Dr. Philippa Smith (Auckland University of Technology, New Zealand), Dr. Kim Trager-Bohley (Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis), and Dr. Sonja Utz (Knowledge Media Research Center and University of Tübingen, Germany).

Merci à Teresa Harrison, l'éditrice dirigeante du Journal électronique de communication, qui a tenu ce projet à se dérouler sans problème.

Les co-éditrices de l'édition:
Dr. Teresa Heinz Housel, Open Polytechnic of New Zealand
Dr. Vickie L. Harvey, California State University Stanislaus

Références

Ali, S. R., & Fahmy, S. (2013). Gatekeeping and citizen journalism: The use of social media during the recent uprisings in Iran, Egypt, and Libya. Media, War and Conflict, 6(1), 55-69. doi: 10.1177/1750635212469906

Andreassen, H. K., & Dyb, K. (2010). Differences and inequalities in health. Information, Communication & Society, 13(7), 956-975. doi: 10.1080/1369118X.2010.499953

Artino, A. R. (2007). Online military training: Using a social cognitive view of motivation and self-regulation to understand students’ satisfaction, perceived learning, and choice. Quarterly Review of Distance Education, 8(3), 191-202. Retrieved from http://eric.ed.gov/?id=EJ875059

Bandura, A. (1988). Self-regulation of motivation and action through goal systems. In V. Hamilton, G. H. Bower, & N. H. Frijda (Eds.), Cognitive perspectives on emotion and motivation (pp. 37-61). Dordrecht, The Netherlands: Kluwer Academic. doi: 10.1007/978-94-009-2792-6_2

Bennett, L. (2014). ‘If we stick together we can do anything’: Lady Gaga fandom, philanthropy and activism through social media. Celebrity Studies, 5(1-2), 138-152. doi: 10.1080/19392397.2013.813778

Bunch, S. (2016). Experiences of students with specific learning disorder (including ADHD) in online college degree programs: A phenomenological study (Doctoral dissertation). Liberty University, Lynchburg, VA, 2016. Retrieved from http://digitalcommons.liberty.edu/doctoral/1190

Caron, A.H., & Caronia, L. (2007). Moving cultures: Mobile communication in everyday life. McGill-Queens University Press. Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/j.ctt80wpd

Carr, N. G. (2008, July/August). Is Google making us stupid? The Atlantic..Retrieved from http://www.theatlantic.com/magazine/archive/2008/07/is-google-making-us-stupid/306868/

Carr, N. G. (2010). The shallows: What the Internet is doing to our brains. New York: W.W. Norton.

Graham, T., Jackson, D., & Wright, S. (2016). ‘We need to get together and make ourselves heard’: Everyday online spaces as incubators of political action. Information, Communication & Society, 19(10), 1373-1389. doi: 10.1080/1369118X.2015.1094113

Karamat, A., & Farooq, A. (2016). Emerging role of social media in political activism: Perceptions and practices. South Asian Studies, 31(1), 381-396. Retrieved from http://pu.edu.pk/images/journal/csas/PDF/25%20Ayesha%20Karamat_v31_no1_jan-jun2016.pdf

Kling, R. (1996). Hopes and horrors: Technological utopianism and anti-utopianism in narratives of computerization. In R. Kling (Ed.), Communication and controversy (2nd ed., pp. 40-58). San Diego, CA: Academic.

McOmber, J. B. (1999). Technology autonomy and three definitions of technology. Journal of Communications, 49(3), 137-153. doi: 10.1111/j.1460-2466.1999.tb02809.x

Milio, N. (1996). Engines of empowerment. Chicago, IL: Health Administration.

Tawfik, A.A., Reeves, T.D., & Stich, A. (2016). Intended and unintended consequences of educational technology on social inequality. TechTrends, 1-8. doi: 10.1007/s11528-016-0109-5

Vasilescu, B., Capiluppi, A., & Serebrenik, A. (2014). Gender, representation and online participation: A quantitative study. Interacting with Computers, 26(5), 488-511. doi: 10.1093/iwc/iwt047

Wellman, B. (1997). The road to utopia and dystopia on the information highway? Contemporary Sociology, 26(4), 445-449. Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2655085

Winters, P. A. (1998). Information revolution: Opposing viewpoints. San Diego, CA: Greenhaven.


Fighting Electronically:
Long-Distance Romantic Couples’ Conflict Management Over Mediated Communication

Sun Kyong Lee
Megan A. Bassick
Stacie Wilson Mumpower

University of Oklahoma
Norman, OK, USA

Abstract: This study examined how long-distance romantic (LDR) couples’ conflict styles were associated with their communication media choice for initiating conflicts with their partners. Using an online survey mostly with a college student sample (N = 391), we analyzed relationships between four conflict styles (i.e., volatile, hostile, validating, avoiding) and five communication modes (i.e., texting, email, phone calls, video chat, face-to-face meeting) while controlling for the effects of demographics, attachment styles, and extroverted personality. LDRs’ conflict styles were distinctively associated with various communication channels: email was significantly associated with hostile conflict style, phone call with volatile and hostile styles, and video chat with validating conflict style. Texting was not associated with any conflict styles, but instead with preoccupied attachment. Face-to-face meeting was negatively associated with a voiding conflict style. LDR partners seemed to choose communication channels for initiating conflicts based on their perceptions of media affordances (i.e., cue multiplicity, synchronicity, and mobility).

Se battre électroniquement: la gestion du conflit des couples romantiques à longue distance sur la communication favorisée : Abrégé : Cette étude examine comment les styles de conflit des couples romantiques à longue distance étaient associés avec leurs choix de communication médiatique pour initier des conflits avec leurs partenaires. En utilisant un sondage en ligne avec un échantillon d'étudiants universitaire (N = 391), nous avons analysé les relations entre quatre styles de conflit (l'instable, l'hostile, la validation, l'évitable) et cinq modes de communication (le texte, le courrier électronique, des coups de téléphone, des vidéos chats, des rencontres face à face) tout en contrôlant pour les effets démographiques, les styles préfér&eacut e;s, et les personnalités extraverties. 
Les styles de conflit des couples romantiques à longue distance étaient distinctement associés dans les chaînes variées de communication: le courrier électronique était associé de façon considérable avec un style de conflit hostile, les coups de téléphone avaient des styles hostiles et volatiles, et les vidéos chats ont confirmé le style du conflit. Les textes n'étaient pas associé avec aucun style de conflit, mais plutôt avec un attachement préoccupant. Les rencontres en face à face étaient négativement associées avec le style d'éviter les conflits. Les partenaires des couples romantiques à longue distance ont l'air de choisir des chaînes de communication pour initier des conflits basés sur leurs perceptions des possibilités des médias (la multiplicité, la synchronicité, et la mobilité).


Using Facebook and Skype for Marital Communication During American Military Deployment:
A Uses and Gratifications Perspective

Margaret C. Stewart
University of North Florida
Jacksonville, FL, USA

Laurie A. Grosik
Saint Francis University
Loretto, PA, USA

Abstract: Loved ones of military personnel rely on innovative technologies to mediate their communication and attain vital family information during wartime deployment. This exploratory study analyzes data from interviews with ten American military spouses about the impact of Facebook and Skype as tools for maintenance of their marriages during deployment. Uses and gratifications theory guides this discussion of two central themes – mobility as well as monitoring and surveillance - which emerge in this original pilot study. As such, uses and gratifications theory is recognized as a framework in constant evolution in contemporary communication research due to the dynamic nature of social media and technologically-mediated communication.

Utilisation de Facebook et Skype pour les communications conjugales pendant le déploiement des militaires américains: une perspective d'utilisations et de gratifications : Abrégé : Les êtres chers du personnel militaire ont besoin de technologies innovantes pour servir de médiateur dans leurs communications et atteindre des informations familiales vitales pendant leurs déploiements en temps de guerre. Cette étude exploratoire analyse des données à partir d'interviews avec dix épouses militaires américaines sur l'impact de Facebook et de Skype comme outils pour maintenir leurs mariages pendant le déploiement. Les théories d'utilisations et de gratifications guident cette discussion sur les deux thèmes centraux - la mobilité ainsi que la vérification et la surveillance - qui éme rgent de cette étude pilote originale. De ce fait, la théorie d'utilisations et de gratifications est reconnue dans le cadre d'une évolution constante dans la recherche d'une communication contemporaine grâce à la nature du média social et de la communication par médiateur technologique. 

Multimodal Communication, Idealization, and Relational Quality in College Students' Parental Relationships:
A Model of Partner Idealization in Ongoing Relationships

Erin M. Sumner
Trinity University
San Antonio, TX, USA

Artemio Ramirez Jr.
University of South Florida
Tampa, FL, USA

Abstract: This study tested the partner idealization component of the hyperpersonal perspective, and extended this perspective to the study of an ongoing relationship – college students and their parents. We proposed a model to encompass the cognitive and behavioral idealization mechanisms that past research identified as provoking positive relational outcomes. Results indicated that mediated communication frequency was positively related to both idealization and relational quality, and that idealization partially mediated the statistical relationship between mediated communication frequency and relational quality. Face-to-face communication frequency was inversely related to one indicator of idealization (positive affect thinking), but was not directly related to relational quality. That said, indirect effects were detected, such that face-to-face communication frequency was negatively and indirectly related to relational quality as a function of positive affect thinking. These results were interpreted using concepts from interpersonal, family, and computer-mediated communication, and research future directions were discussed.

La communication multimodale, l'idéalisation, et la qualité relationnelle dans les relations entre parents et étudiants: un modèle d'idéalisation de partenaires dans des relations continues : Abrégé : Cette étude a testé  l'élément d'idéalisation du partenaire de la perspective hyperpersonelle, et a étendu cette perspective à l'étude d'une relation continue - les étudiants universitaires et leurs parents. Nous avons proposé un modèle qui comprend les mécanismes d'idéalisation du comportement et du cognitif que des recherches passés ont identifié comme provoquant des résultats relationnels positifs. Les résultats ont indiqué que la fréquence de communication de médiateur  a été en relation po sitive à l'idéalisation et à la qualité relationnelle, et que l'idéalisation a partiellement médiatiser les relations entre la fréquence de communication médiatisée et la qualité relationnelle. La fréquence d'une communication en face à face était inversement relié à un indicateur d'idéalisation (l'effet positif de la pensée), mais n'était pas directement relié à la qualité relationnelle. Cela dit, des effets indirects ont été détectés, telle que la fréquence de la communication en face à face était négativement et indirectement relié à la qualité relationnelle comme fonction du positif qui affecte la pensée. Ces résultats ont été interprétés en utilisant des concepts interpersonnelles, de famille, et de communicati on interposé par ordinateur, et des directions pour des recherches futures ont été discutées.  

Transgender Transitioning:
The Influence of Virtual on Physical Identities

Sara Green-Hamann
John C. Sherblom

University of Maine
Orono, ME, USA

Abstract: A person may experience tension when a gender identity differs from the one that society expects. For a transgender person, this gender identity tension can pose communication challenges for personal and social relationships. A virtual environment provides a space between the personal and public presentations of self in which an individual can negotiate these tensions and explore a gender identity transition. As participants become immersed within the time and space of this virtual environment, they can reshape their identities in ways that have an influence, or Proteus effect, on their physical self-expressions. Our study examines the supportive conversations of a male-to-female transgender group that meets in Second Life. By analyzing the topics, indicators of virtual identity, and references to the Proteus effect in these conversations, we seek to understand how participants purposefully construct virtual identities that facilitate their physical, relational, and personal transgender identity transitions. Our analysis of these conversations concludes that the support group environment assists in the development of these virtual identities, and that participants recognize positive Proteus effects in their physical-life transgender transitions.

La transition des transgenres: l'influence du virtuel sur les identités physiques : Abrégé : Une personne peut ressentir de la tension quand l'identité du sexe diffère de celui que la société attend. Pour une personne transgenre, cette tension d'identité de genre peut poser des difficultés de communication pour les relations personnelles et publiques. Un environnement virtuel offre un espace entre les présentations personnelles et publiques du soi dans lequel un individu peut négocier ces tensions et explorer une transition d'identité de genre. Au moment où les participants deviennent immerger dans l'espace et le temps de cet environnement virtuel, Ils  reconstruisent leurs identités d'une façon qui a de l'influence, ou bien l'effet de Protée, sur leurs expressions personnell es physiques. Notre étude examine les conversations solidaires d'un groupe transgenre d'homme à femme qui se retrouve à Second Life. En analysant les thèmes, les indicateurs d'identité virtuelle et les références sur l'effet de Protée dans ces conversations, nous cherchons à comprendre comment les participants construisent délibérément des identités virtuelles qui facilite leurs transitions physiques, relationnelles, et personnelles d'identité transgenre. Notre analyse de ces conversations conclu que l'environnement d'un groupe support aide dans le développement de ces identités virtuelles, et que les participants reconnaissent les effets positifs de Protée dans leurs transitions transgenres de la vie et du physique.

The Impact of Smartphone Educational Use on
Student Connectedness and Out-of-Class Involvement

Xun (Sunny) Liu
Nancy F. Burroughs
Qing Tian
Vickie L. Harvey
California State University, Stanislaus
Turlock, CA, USA

Teresa Heinz Housel
Open Polytechnic of New Zealand
Wellingon, NZ

Abstract: This study investigates the impact of smartphones on student connectedness and out-of-class involvement. Our analysis draws on the technological acceptance model and involvement theory to explain how students’ perceived ease of use and usefulness of smartphones might impact their educational use. We examined how educational smartphone use might determine students’ connectedness in class and out-of-class involvement. We surveyed 267 college students and developed a structural equation model to explain out-of-class involvement. The results show that educational smartphone use significantly predicts student connectedness and out-of-class involvement. Our research offers several theoretical contributions. First, this study extends involvement theory to also include technology use as an involvement activity, and empirically tests it on smartphones in educational contexts. Second, we developed a theoretical model to explain student out -of-class involvement. Our study’s empirical findings will guide instructors in developing effective mobile device policies and class activities that use smartphones.

L'impact de l'utilisation éducationnelle du smartphone sur la connexité des étudiants et de leurs l'engagements hors des classes : Abrégé : Cette étude mène une enquête de l'impact des smartphones sur la connexité des étudiants et de leurs engagements hors des classes. Notre analyse tire du modèle d'acceptation technologique et de la théorie participative pour expliquer comment la facilité d'utilisation est saisie par les étudiants et l'utilité des smartphones peut avoir un effet sur leur utilisation éducative. Nous examinons comment l'utilisation des smartphones peut déterminer la connexité de leur engagement en classe et en dehors de la classe. Nous avons mené une enquête auprès de 267 étudiants universitaires et avons développé un mod&egrav e;le d'équation structural pour expliquer l'engagement hors des classes. Les résultats montrent que l'utilisation d'un smartphone éducationnel prédit la connexité des étudiants et de leurs engagements hors des classes. Notre recherche offrent plusieurs contributions éducationnelles. Premièrement, cette étude élargie la théorie de l'engagement pour inclure l'utilisation de la technologie comme une activité d'engagement, et examine de façon empirique sur des smartphones dans des contextes éducationnels. Deuxièmement, nous avons développé un modèle théorique pour expliquer l'engagement des étudiants en dehors de la classe. Les conclusions de notre étude empirique guidera les instructeurs à développer des règles efficaces pour des appareils mobiles ainsi que des activités en classe qui utilisent des smartph ones. 


Copyright 2016 Communication Institute for Online Scholarship, Inc.

This file may not be publicly distributed or reproduced without written permission of
the Communication Institute for Online Scholarship,
P.O. Box 57, Rotterdam Jct., NY 12150 USA (phone: 518-887-2443).