Communication Institute for Online Scholarship
Communication Institute for Online
Scholarship Continous online service and innovation
since 1986
Site index
 
ComAbstracts Visual Communication Concept Explorer Tables of Contents Electronic Journal of Communication ComVista

EJC 27(1 & 2): Risk, Crisis, Emergency, and Disaster / Un risque, une crise, une urgence, un désastre
Electronic Journal of Communication

Volume 27 Numbers 1 & 2, 2017

Risk, Crisis, Emergency, and Disaster:
On Discourse, Materiality, and Consequentiality of Communication /
Un risque, une crise, une urgence, un désastre :
L’échange, la matérialité, et la conséquence de la communication

With Editor / Avec éditrice :

Mariaelena Bartesaghi
University of South Florida
Tampa, FL, USA


Editor's Introduction: Risk, Crisis, Emergency, and Disaster: On Discourse, Materiality, and Consequentiality of Communication L’introduction de l'éditrice : Un risque, une crise, une urgence, un désastre : L’échange, la matérialité, et la conséquence de la communication

Mariaelena Bartesaghi
University of South Florida
Tampa, FL, USA

Crisis at the Courthouse: Examining Challenges to Normativity / Une crise au palais de justice : Examinons les défis à la normativité

Trudy Milburn
Purchase College
Purchase, NY, USA

An Examination of the Use of Twitter during the West Virginia Water Crisis / Une étude sur l'utilisation de Twitter pendant la crise de contamination d'eau en Virginie-Occidentale

Morgan C. Getchell
Morehead State University
Morehead, KY, USA

Timothy L. Sellnow
University of Central Florida
Orlando, FL, USA

Emina Herovic
University of Maryland
Lexington, KY, USA

Dominance and Danger in South Louisiana: Social Media and the Construction of Risk and Authority in the Fight over Fracking / La dominance et le danger dans le Sud de la Louisiane : Le média social et la construction du risque et de l'autorité dans la bataille sur la fracturation hydraulique

Stephanie Houston Grey
Johanna M. Broussard

Louisiana State University
Baton Rouge, LA, USA

Constructing Authority in Disaster Relief Coordination / Construire une autorité dans la coordination d'une aide dans un désastre

Matthew A. Koschmann
Jared Kopczynski
Aaron Opdyke
Amy Javernick-Will

University of Colorado Boulder
Boulder, CO, USA

Twitter and the Iceland Ash Cloud: Discourse in an International Crisis / Twitter et le nuage de cendres volcaniques islandais : Le discours d'en une crise internationale

Maxine Gesualdi
West Chester University
West Chester, PA, USA

When Crisis Becomes Policy: Credit Card Security Crises and Congressional Speeches / Quand la crise devient une mesure politique : La crise sur la sécurité des cartes de crédits et les discours du Congrès

Alison N. Novak
M. Olguta Vilceanu

Rowan University
Glassboro, NJ, USA


Original Research Article

Organizations in Hiding: Appropriateness, Effectiveness, and Motivations for Concealment / Les organisations qui se cachent : La pertinence, l'efficacité, et les motivations pour la dissimulation

Surabhi Sahay
Maria Dwyer
Craig R. Scott
Punit Dadlani
Erin McKinley

Rutgers University
New Brunswick, NJ, USA


Editor's Introduction: Risk, Crisis, Emergency, and Disaster:
On Discourse, Materiality, and Consequentiality of Communication

Mariaelena Bartesaghi
University of South Florida,
Tampa, FL, USA

Organizational scholar Karl Weick notes that large scale disasters do not begin that way. His phenomenological insight into sensemaking, or how organizational members work to piece together past, present, and an as yet unrealized future in times of gathering uncertainty, allows us to reconstruct catastrophic outcomes as micro-level regularities. As he puts it, they are no more than the chaining of actions and reactions to “small events [that] combine to have disproportionately large effects” (2010, p. 125). Similarly, in their chilling account of a 911 phone call that fails to materialize in the dispatch of an ambulance, Whalen, Zimmerman and Whalen (1988) show how an emergency which culminates in an unnecessary death is a joint production between the caller and the 911 operator. In the orderly, turn-by-turn interplay of utterances, we see how each speaker operates within different territories of knowledge (Heritage, 2012) and therefore different epistemic rights, obligations and authority with respect to defining the ontology of emergency, even as they take the conversation to its “fateful dénouement” (p. 240). Because the meanings of events as they occur are as yet mostly undetermined, we use retrospection to make sense of what has happened. We use measures, accounts, justifications, and a social vocabulary of redress. We speak of and study “risk,” “crisis,” and “disaster” as discrete phenomena that are affected by and captured in communication rather than constructed through communication in and of itself (Bartesaghi & Castor, 2010). And yet it is communication that grants salience to some possibilities and excludes others, even as events themselves unfold (Castor & Bartesaghi, 2016; Chia, 2000).

The need to study crisis as in-the-moment sensemaking, and, indeed, the seeds for this special issue were planted in me in September of 2005, when I received a small package in the mail from the still flooded Jefferson Parish, Louisiana. In it were ten CDs of recorded teleconferences held by local, state, and federal officials in the days immediately preceding and in the course of Hurricane Katrina, until loss of communication. These conversations, moderated by Colonel Jeff Smith and featuring Mayor Ray Nagin, Governor Blanco, FEMA, the National Weather Service, the Red Cross and Parish representatives, among other speakers, were later part of what was deemed as a failure of “coordination.”  And yet speakers were very well coordinated, in the sense that they followed a pre-existing plan quite precisely, and in that Smith did not allow for deviations to the plan. In fact, I found that though the term “coordination” becomes part of the social di scourse of blame and redress after the fact, and that it appears as a recommendation in scholarly and public discourse alike, speakers in the calls used it in a very different way. To them, being coordinated meant the ability to invoke “coordination” to align with certain actions and disaffiliate with speakers who would not act accordingly, and to authorize certain decisions as part of a common goal, as opposed to acting alone. One such course of action was the request by the leaders of some low-lying parishes to evacuate earlier than others, which Jeff Smith denied by speaking for the plan. For the sake of coordination, the Superdome ended up as a shelter of last resort (see Bartesaghi, 2014).

The articles in this special issue take an important step toward a reconceptualization of sensemaking as a practical epistemic endeavor, that is, as members’ knowledge as they authorize accountable versions of what is happening in terms of the social vocabulary of risk, crisis, emergency, and disaster, and acting in consequence according to those terms. By examining the ways in which risk, crisis and disaster emerge in communicative dynamics designed to understand, address, and in fact, communicate about these very constructs, each article in this issue adds to our understanding of how crisis is “risk that is manifested” (Heath & O’Hair, 2009, p. 6) in the interplay of inter-action, be it in social media, conversation, texts, and the intertextual and multimodal connections between them.

What I especially appreciate about the pieces is the range of situations that they examine, demonstrating that it is not the magnitude of events that matters, but what they teach us about the dynamics of communication at the heart of crisis, emergency, risk, and disaster. In Milburn’s discourse analysis of a same-sex couple’s confrontation with a Kentucky County Clerk over her denial to issue a marriage license, we see how an interpersonal conflict indexes the morally laden values of socially ordered and multiple identities. In other words, Milburn shows how speakers in crisis situations address listeners beyond those that are immediately present, speaking to and for what they consider a greater authority.

The study by Grey and Broussard and the collaborative article between communication scholars Koschmann and Kopczynski and civil and architectural engineering researchers Opdyke and Javernick-Will also underscore how authority materializes crisis, in the very real sense that it makes it matter (Cooren, 2015). By problematizing the very notion of risk, Grey and Broussard’s rhetorical analysis of the case of fracking in Lousiana examines how risk is inherently political and polycentric discourse; what Mehan (1996) would call “a case in the politics of representation” between experts and counter publics and each party’s ability to mobilize media  to speak on their behalf. Koschmann et al.’s brilliant analysis of the accomplishment of a coordinated multiparty disaster relief effort in the wake of the Philippine’s Typhoon Yolanda helps us appreciate how authority is itself shifting and emergent in processes of sensemaking, and, reflexively, a resource for sensemaking. Novak and Vilceneau’s study of the public discourse surrounding credit card security is equally compelling in demonstrating how a discursive approach to sensemaking can aid policymakers in a reflexive understanding of their own role in the unfolding of crisis. The authors’ analysis of C-SPAN debates reveals the importance of temporality in crisis discourse, and how retrospective and reactive arguments prevailed over potentially more useful statements about the ability to address future incidents.

It is no accident that this special issue has two articles that examine the role of Twitter, for analyses of social media are no doubt a privileged site for capturing in-the-moment processes of everyday knowledge making among diverse publics, and the intertextual and multimodal interplay of authors and authority. Gesualdi’s accomplished case analysis of the Twitter exchanges in the course of the Icelandic volcano ash cloud focuses on the crucial role of hashtags in framing the conversation, by means of a discursive network of users that imposed order from chaos. Getchell, Sellnow and Herovic’s study of the 2014 West Virginia water contamination crisis tracks over six thousand Twitter messages as real time sensemaking to encourage organizations to use Twitter to its full potential, not only to understand public sentiment about what is happening, but to move beyond one-way transmission into conversational exchanges allowed by the medium.

I thank each of the authors in this issue for their hard work in making critical and timely inroads in situating risk, crisis, emergency, and disaster firmly in the study of communication.

References

Bartesaghi, M. (2014). Coordination: Examining weather as a 'matter of concern'. Communication Studies, 65(5), 535–557 doi: 10.1080/10510974.2014.957337

Bartesaghi, M., & Castor, T. (2010, December). Disasters as social interaction. Communication Currents, 5, 6. Retrieved from https://www.natcom.org/communication-currents/disasters-social-interaction

Castor, T., & Bartesaghi, M. (2016). Metacommunication in Hurricane Katrina teleconferences:  ‘Reporting’ in the construction of problems. Management Communication Quarterly, 30(4), 472-502.

Chia, R. (2000). Discourse analysis as organizational analysis. Organization, 7(3), 513-518.

Cooren, F. (2015). In medias res: Communication, existence, and materiality. Communication Research and Practice, 1(4), 307-321

Heath, R. L., & O’Hair, H. D. (2009). The significance of risk and crisis communication. In R. L. Heath & H. D. O’Hair (Eds.), Handbook of risk and crisis communication (pp. 5-30). New York, NY: Routledge.

Heritage, J, (2012). Epistemics in action: Action formation and territories of knowledge. Research on Language and Social Interaction, 45(1), 1–29.

Mehan, H. (1996). The cnstruction of an LD student: A case study in the politics of representation. In M. Silverstein & G. Urban (Eds.), Natural Histories of Discourse (pp. 253-277). Chicago, IL: University of Chicago Press.

Weick, K. (2010). Reflections on enacted sensemaking in the Bhopal disaster. Journal of Management Studies, 47(3), 537–550. doi: 10.1111/j.1467-6486.2010.00900.x

Whalen, J., Zimmerman, D., & Whalen, M. (1988). When words fail: A single case analysis. Social Problems, 35(4), 335-362.


L’introduction de l'éditrice :
Un risque, une crise, une urgence, un désastre :
L’échange, la matérialité, et la conséquence de la communication

Mariaelena Bartesaghi
University of South Florida,
Tampa, FL, USA

Le chercheur organisationnel Karl Weick indique que les désastres à grandes échelles ne commencent pas ainsi. Sa vision phénoménologique pour établir un raisonnement, ou bien la façon dont les membres d'une organisation travaillent afin de reconstituer le passé, le présent, et un futur non encore réaliser dans des périodes de collecte d'informations incertaines, nous permet de reconstruire des conséquences catastrophiques comme des régularités aux niveaux micros. Selon lui, elles ne sont pas plus que des actions et des réactions en chaîne à "des petits événements [qui] fusionnent des grands effets disproportionnés" (2010, p. 125). De même, dans leur compte terrifiant d'un appel 911 qui échoue de réaliser la demande d'un service d'ambulance, Whalen, Zimmerman et Whalen (1988) montrent comment une urgence qui culmine dans une mort inutile est une production jointe entre la personne qui compose le numéro d'urgence et le répartiteur d'urgence. Dans les déclarations précises de l'appel, nous observons que chaque interlocuteur agit dans des territoires de connaissances différentes (Heritage, 2012) et par conséquent des droits épistémiques différents, des obligations et de l'autorité en se qui concerne ce qui définit l'urgence ontologique, même s'ils suivent la conversation jusqu'au moment du dénouement fatal (p. 240). Comme le sens des événements qui se développent ne sont pas encore déterminés, nous utilisons la rétrospection afin de rendre un sens à ce qui vient d'arriver. Nous utilisons les mesures, les comptes, les justifications, et un vocabulaire social de réparation. Nous parlons de et étudions "le risque", "la crise", et " le désastre" comme phénomène distinct qui sont affectés par et capturés dans la communication plutôt que d'être construit à travers la communication en elle-même (Bartesaghi & Castor, 2010). Et cependant, c'est la communication qui accorde une prépondérance à certaines possibilités et exclus d'autres même quand les événements eux-mêmes se déroulent (Castor & Bartesaghi, 2016; Chia, 2000).

Le besoin d'étudier les crises dans l'instant du raisonnement, et, en fait, le germe de cette édition spéciale qui a été planté dans mon esprit en septembre 2005 quand j'ai reçu par courrier un petit paquet de la Paroisse de Jefferson en Louisiane qui était encore inondée. Dans ce paquet se trouvait dix CD d'enregistrement de téléconférences organisées par les autorités locales, par ceux de l'état, et par ceux du gouvernement fédéral dans les jours précédents ainsi que pendant l'ouragan de Katrina jusqu'à la perte de communication. Ces conversations modérées par le colonel Jeff Smith et ayant le maire de la Nouvelle Orléans Ray Nagin, le gouverneur Blanco, FEMA, le service de la météo nationale, La Croix Rouge et des représentants de la Paroisse, parmi d'autres orateurs, qui ont fait partie de ce qui sera décrit comme un échec de "coordination". Et cependant, les orateurs étaient très bien coordonnés, dans le sens qu'ils ont suivi un plan préexistant bien précisément, et dans ce cas là Smith empêchait toutes déviations de ce plan. En fait, j'ai trouvé que bien que le terme de "coordination" devienne une partie d'un discours social de blâme et de réparation après le fait, et que cela apparaît comme une recommandation dans les échanges érudits et publiques, les orateurs dans ces conversations l'ont utilisé de façon très différentes. Pour eux, être coordonné voulait dire d'avoir la capacité d'invoquer la "coordination" afin de s'aligner avec certaines actions et de se détacher des orateurs qui ne veulent pas se comporter de cette manière, et d'autoriser cer taines décisions comme faisant partie d'un but commun, à l'opposé d'y aller seul. Un des plans d'actions était la demande par les chefs de certaines paroisses basses d'évacuer plus tôt que d'autres et que Jeff Smith a refusé en défendant son plan. Pour l'intérêt de la coordination, le Superdome a été utilisé comme abri de dernier recours (Bartesaghi, 2014).

Les articles dans cette édition spéciale prennent un pas important vers une re-conceptualisation du raisonnement comme un effort épistémique pratique, c'est à dire, la connaissance des membres quand ils autorisent les versions compréhensibles de ce qui arrive dans les façons du vocabulaire social du risque, d'une crise, d'une urgence, d'un désastre, et d'agir en conséquence en se basant sur ces termes. En examinant les façons dans lesquelles le risque, la crise et le sinistre émergent des dynamiques communicatives conçu pour comprendre, s'adresser, et en fait, communiquer avec ces constructions de phrases, chaque article de cette édition aide notre compréhension à juger comment la crise est un "risque qui est manifesté" (Heath & O'Hair, 2009, p.6) dans l'interaction, que ce soit le média social, la convers ation, les textes, et les connexions inter-textuelles et multi-modaux entre eux.

Ce que j'apprécie avec ces articles en particulier est la variété de situations qu'ils examinent, en démontrant que ce n'est pas l'ampleur des événements qui sont en questions, mais ce qu'ils nous apprennent au sujet des dynamiques des conversations dans le cœur d'une crise, d'une urgence, d'un risque, et d'un désastre. Dans l'analyse de discours de Milburn sur la confrontation d'un couple homosexuel avec un secrétaire du comté du Kentucky sur sa décision de ne pas accorder de certificat de mariage, nous voyons comment un conflit interpersonnel indexe les valeurs morales d'un ordre social et d'identités multiples. Ainsi, Milburn  nous montre comment les intervenants dans des situations de crise s'adressent aux auditeurs au delà de ce qui sont présents, qui parlent à et pour ce qu'ils considèrent comme une autorité plus importante.

L'étude de Grey et de Broussard et l'article collaboratif entre les spécialistes de la communication que sont Koschmann et Kopczynski et les ingénieurs de recherche civile et architecturale que sont Opdyke et Javernick-Will soulignent comment l'autorité matérialise la crise dans le sens réel que cela devient une question importante (Cooren, 2015). La problématique de cette notion du risque, l'analyse rhétorique de Grey et de Broussard sur la fracturation hydraulique en Louisiane examine comment le risque est fondamentalement un échange politique et polycentrique; ce que Mehan (1996) aurait appelé "un cas dans les politiques de la représentation" entre les experts et les publics contredits et la capacité de chaque partie de mobilisé le média afin de parler pour eux. L'analyse brillante de Koschmann et al. sur la réussite d'un effort d'aide humanitaire coordonné par plusieurs parties dans le sillage du typhon Yolanda aux Philippines nous aident à apprécier comment l'autorité elle-même change et émerge d'un processus de raisonnement, et, automatiquement, devient une ressource pour le raisonnement. L'étude de Novak et de Vilceneau sur le discours public sur la sécurité des cartes de crédit est aussi fascinante en démontrant comment une approche discursive pour le raisonnement peut aider les décisionnaires sur leurs compréhensions réflectives de leur propre rôle dans une crise en cours. L'analyse des auteurs sur les débats de C-SPAN ont révélé l'importance de la temporalité du discours en crise et comment les arguments rétrospectifs et réactifs ont prévalu sur des déclarations potentiellement plus utiles sur les capac ités de résoudre des incidents futurs.

Ce n'est pas par accident que cette édition spéciale ait deux articles sur le rôle de Twitter, car les analyses des médias sociaux ne sont sans aucun doute un lieu privilégié pour saisir dans le moment des processus de savoirs de tout les jours parmi les publics divers, et l'interaction inter-textuelle et multi-modal des auteurs et de l'autorité. L'analyse de cas par Gesualdi sur les échanges de tweets durant le nuage de cendres volcanique en Islande qui ce concentrait sur le rôle crucial des hashtags dans l'encadrement de la conversation, par moyen d'un réseau d'utilisateurs discursifs pour imposer de l'ordre au chaos. L'étude de Getchell, de Sellnow, et de Herovic sur la crise de contamination d'eau en 2014 en Virginie-Occidentale qui a suivi plus de six milles messages de Twitter en temps réel de raisonnement pour encourager les organisations à utilisé Twitter à son potentiel plein, non seulement afin de comprendre le sentiment public sur ce qui se passe, mais aussi pour aller plus loin qu'une transmission unique dans les échanges conversationnels permis par ce milieu.

Je remercie tous les auteurs de cette édition pour le travail qu'ils ont fait et qui a entamé des percées opportunes et critiques à situer le risque, la crise, l'urgence, et le désastre fermement dans l'étude de la communication.

References

Bartesaghi, M. (2014). Coordination: Examining weather as a 'matter of concern'. Communication Studies, 65(5), 535–557 doi: 10.1080/10510974.2014.957337

Bartesaghi, M., & Castor, T. (2010, December). Disasters as social interaction. Communication Currents, 5, 6. Retrieved from https://www.natcom.org/communication-currents/disasters-social-interaction

Castor, T., & Bartesaghi, M. (2016). Metacommunication in Hurricane Katrina teleconferences:  ‘Reporting’ in the construction of problems. Management Communication Quarterly, 30(4), 472-502.

Chia, R. (2000). Discourse analysis as organizational analysis. Organization, 7(3), 513-518.

Cooren, F. (2015). In medias res: Communication, existence, and materiality. Communication Research and Practice, 1(4), 307-321

Heath, R. L., & O’Hair, H. D. (2009). The significance of risk and crisis communication. In R. L. Heath & H. D. O’Hair (Eds.), Handbook of risk and crisis communication (pp. 5-30). New York, NY: Routledge.

Heritage, J, (2012). Epistemics in action: Action formation and territories of knowledge. Research on Language and Social Interaction, 45(1), 1–29.

Mehan, H. (1996). The cnstruction of an LD student: A case study in the politics of representation. In M. Silverstein & G. Urban (Eds.), Natural Histories of Discourse (pp. 253-277). Chicago, IL: University of Chicago Press.

Weick, K. (2010). Reflections on enacted sensemaking in the Bhopal disaster. Journal of Management Studies, 47(3), 537–550. doi: 10.1111/j.1467-6486.2010.00900.x

Whalen, J., Zimmerman, D., & Whalen, M. (1988). When words fail: A single case analysis. Social Problems, 35(4), 335-362.


Crisis at the Courthouse: Examining Challenges to Normativity

Trudy Milburn
Purchase College
Purchase, NY, USA

Abstract: In June of 2015, a County Clerk of a Kentucky courthouse refused to issue a marriage license to a same-sex couple, despite being legally required to do so by a Supreme Court edict. The incident made headline news and sparked a national debate. A close analysis of the interactions during the incident reveals participants proffering several member categories and related actions in an attempt to persuade one another of the morality of a given position. Within these conversational moves, participants attempt to make sense of the unfolding events. As communication researchers we can use participants’ own strategies and orientations to learn more about how an interpersonal conflict can form part of a larger social crisis. When a challenger attempts to entice a target with leading questions, we find targets resisting through means of silence as well as appeals to alternate categories. When these attempts are examined closely through membership categorizati on analysis, we find that categories and their related actions may be used to reinforce outdated norms.

Une crise au palais de justice : Examinons les défis à la normativité : Abrégé : En juin 2015, un secrétaire d'un palais de justice d'un comté du Kentucky a refusé d'accorder un certificat de mariage à un couple homosexuel malgré d'être légalement obliger de le faire à partir d'un décret de la cour suprême. Cet incident à fait les gros titres de la presse et a déclenché un débat national. Une analyse proche des interactions pendant l'incident a révélé des participants offrant à des membres de certaines catégories et dans des actions liées dans une tentative de persuader l'un l'autre de la moralité d'une position donnée. Dans ces mesures conversationnelles, les participants essaient de donner un sens à des &eacut e;vénements qui se déroulent. En tant que chercheurs en communication, nous pouvons utiliser les stratégies et les orientations des participants pour mieux comprendre comment un conflit interpersonnel peut former une partie d'une plus grande crise sociale. Quand un challenger essaie d'inciter une cible avec des questions suggestives, nous trouvons que les cibles résistent à travers les moyens du silence ainsi que par des demandes pour d'autres catégories. Quand ces tentatives sont examinées de près à travers l'analyse des adhésions de catégorisations, nous trouvons que les catégories et leurs actions liées pourraient être utilisées afin de renforcer des normes dépassées.


An Examination of the Use of Twitter during the West Virginia Water Crisis

Morgan C. Getchell
Morehead State University
Morehead, KY, USA

Timothy L. Sellnow
University of Central Florida
Orlando, FL, USA

Emina Herovic
University of Maryland
College Park, MD, USA

Abstract: Social media is playing an increasing role in how people acquire information, express themselves, and socially construct the crisis events they experience first-hand and observe indirectly. Twitter, in particular, is useful to crisis communicators because it allows for engaging broad networks in one way and two way communication. This analysis is based on a case study of how Twitter was used during the 2014 West Virginia water contamination crisis. A total of 60,774 Tweets posted between January 9, 2014 (the day the spill began) and January 31, 2014, were analyzed using an inductive content analysis. Organizations responding to the crisis via Twitter focused on one way messages, making little use of the two-way communication opportunities provided by Twitter. The content of the Tweets included a surprisingly limited amount of information providing recommendations for self-protection. Messages establishing meaning for the crisis focused on outr age, religious references, and expressions of sympathy.

Une étude sur l'utilisation de Twitter pendant la crise de contamination d'eau en Virginie-Occidentale : Abrégé : Le média social prend un rôle de plus en plus important dans la façon dont les gens acquièrent l'information, s'expriment, et construisent socialement les évènements de la crise qu'ils ont ressenti directement et qu'ils ont observé indirectement. Twitter, en particulier, est utile aux communicants de crise parce que Twitter permet à de grands réseaux de communiquer de façon directionnels et bidirectionnels. Cette analyse est basée sur une étude de cas sur la façon dont Twitter a été utilisé pendant la crise de contamination d'eau en 2014 en Virginie-Occidentale. Un total de 60 774 tweets ont été affiché entre le 9 janvier 2014 (le jour o&ugrav e; le problème commença) et le 31 janvier 2014 et ont été analysé en utilisant une analyse de contenu inductive. Les organisations qui ont répondu à cette crise à travers Twitter se sont concentrés sur les messages de transmission unique, en ayant peu d'utilisation pour les communications bidirectionnelles qu'offraient Twitter. Le contenu des tweets comprenais une quantité d'information très limitée donnant des recommandations sur des protections personnelles. Les messages établissants un sens à la crise se concentraient sur l'indignation, les références religieuses, et les expressions de sympathies.


Dominance and Danger in South Louisiana:
Social Media and the Construction of Risk and Authority
in the Fight over Fracking

Stephanie Houston Grey
Johanna M. Broussard

Louisiana State University
Baton Rouge, LA, USA

Abstract: This paper explores the controversial and contested proposal to begin hydraulic fracturing (“fracking”) near Lakeshore High School in St. Tammany Parish in Louisiana. St. Tammany, an area normally supportive of the oil and gas industry, has become a hot bed for grass roots activism that crosses generational and political divides as citizens have mobilized in an ongoing attempt to keep their home and environment frack-free. This essay positions risk communication as a site of rhetorical struggle where competing definitions and rhetorics of danger and dominance clash. Throughout this conflict, the use of social media by local environmental activists created a virtual forum to meet, strategize, and disseminate information to the citizenry, creating an elevated consciousness that emboldened the populace with a sense of agency to stand and defend their physical, economic, and environmental health from this dangerous and controversial method of natural gas extraction.

La dominance et le danger dans le Sud de la Louisiane : Le média social et la construction du risque et de l'autorité dans la bataille sur la fracturation hydraulique : Abrégé : Cette article explore la proposition controverse et contesté de commencer la fracturation hydraulique près du lycée de Lakeshore dans la paroisse de St. Tammany en Louisiane, un endroit qui soutient généralement l'industrie du gaz et du pétrole, et qui est devenue un lieu chaud pour un activisme de base qui traverse les divisions générationnelles et politiques des citoyens qui se mobilisent dans un effort de garder leurs maisons et leur environnement sans fracturation hydraulique. Cet essai positionne la communication à risque comme un lieu de difficultés rhétoriques où les définitions en concurrence et les d angers de rhétoriques et de dominances s'affrontent. A travers ce conflit, l'utilisation du média social par les activistes d'environnement locaux a créé un forum virtuel pour se rencontrer, parler de stratégie, et disséminer des informations à la population créant un niveau de conscience élevé afin de donner du courage au peuple avec un besoin de prendre position et de défendre leur santé physique, économique, et d'environnement de cette méthode controversée et dangereuse de l'extraction du gaz naturel.


Constructing Authority in Disaster Relief Coordination

Matthew A. Koschmann
Jared Kopczynski
Aaron Opdyke
Amy Javernick-Will

University of Colorado Boulder
Boulder, CO, USA

Abstract: The purpose of our study is to explore the social construction of authority in disaster relief coordination. We emphasize the ways in which stakeholders draw upon various discursive resources in order to establish or preserve their authority to act within a certain problem domain. We review literature on authority, coordination, communication, and collaborative work to provide a theoretical framework that informs our empirical examples. Next we present a case study of disaster relief coordination in the Philippines following Typhoon Yolanda (known internationally as Haiyan). Our case focuses on home reconstruction in the Cebu province of the Central Visayas region of the Philippines, one of the areas hardest hit by the storm where most of the homes were destroyed or severely damaged. This case demonstrates organizations do not have authority within this problem domain, but instead construct authority through practice and sensemaking in orde r to accomplish a variety of individual and collective goals; authority is in a constant state of negotiation as various organizations coordinate with each other (or not) to provide effective disaster relief. We conclude with a discussion about the contributions and implications of our research.

Construire une autorité dans la coordination d'une aide dans un désastre : Abrégé : Le but de notre étude est d'explorer la construction d'autorité dans la coordination d'une aide dans un désastre. Nous soulignons les façons dans lesquelles les parties intéressées prennent sur des ressources discursives variées afin d'établir ou de préserver leur autorité d'agir dans le domaine d'un certain problème. Nous examinons la littérature sur l'autorité, la coordination, la communication, et le travail collaboratif afin de donner une structure théorique qui informe nos exemples empiriques. Ensuite nous présentons une étude de cas sur la coordination d'une aide à un sinistre dans les Philippines suivant le supertyphon Yolanda (connu dans le monde comme Haiyan). Notre &eac ute;tude se concentre sur la reconstruction des maisons dans la province de Cebu dans la région centrale de Visayas en Philippines, un des lieux le plus touché par la tempête où la plupart des maisons ont été détruites ou sérieusement abîmées. Cette étude prouve que les organisations n'ont pas l'autorité dans ce domaine du problème, mais en fait construisent une autorité à travers de l'entraînement et du raisonnement afin d'accomplir une variété d'objectifs individuelle et collective; l'autorité est dans un état constant de négociations du fait que les organisations diverses s'organisent entre elles (ou pas) afin de donner une aide efficace au désastre. Nous concluons avec une discussion sur les contributions et les implications de notre recherche.


Twitter and the Iceland Ash Cloud:
Discourse in an International Crisis

Maxine Gesualdi
West Chester University
West Chester, PA, USA

Abstract: In April 2010, the Icelandic volcano Eyjafjallajokull erupted and caused a cloud of airborne ash that moved across Europe. This created a crisis for many stakeholders including airlines, NGOs, nation-state governments, consumer groups, the travel and hospitality industry, and individual consumers. This crisis was unique because unlike other scrutinized cases (such as Hurricane Katrina in the U.S.) this was a non-deadly natural disaster that had no human cause, no one to blame, and no real recourse or recovery effort. Using discourse analysis, this case study explores discursive practices of Twitter users who applied the hashtag #ashtag to frame their discussions of the crisis. The results provide an understanding of how people in disparate parts of the globe form a discursive network to comprehend a crisis as it unfolds, which balances the need for levity with the need for utility and creates order from chaos.

Twitter et le nuage de cendres volcaniques islandais : Le discours d'en une crise internationale : Abrégé : En avril 2010, le volcan Eyjafjallajokull est entré en éruption et a provoqué un nuage de cendre qui a traversé l'Europe. Cela a créé une crise pour beaucoup de parties intéressées telles que les compagnies aériennes, les ONG, les gouvernements d'état-nations, les associations de consommateurs, les industries du voyage et de l'hospitalité, et les consommateurs individuels. Cette crise était unique parce que au contraire à d'autres cas qui ont été étudié minutieusement (tel que l'ouragan Katrina aux États Unis), cette crise était un désastre naturel non-mortel qui n'avait pas de cause humaine, qui n'avait personne à blâmer, et qui n'avai t aucun recours réel ou d'effort de récupération. En utilisant une analyse de discours, cette étude de cas explore les pratiques discursives des utilisateurs de Twitter qui ont utilisé le hashtag #ashtag afin d'encadrer leurs discussions sur la crise. Les résultats offrent une compréhension sur la façon dont les gens dans des endroits variés du monde construisent un réseau discursif afin de comprendre une crise qui se déroule, ce qui balance le besoin de légèreté en même temps avec le besoin d'utilité et enfin cette crise crée de l'ordre à partir du chaos.


When Crisis Becomes Policy:
Credit Card Security Crises and Congressional Speeches

Alison N. Novak
M. Olguta Vilceanu

Rowan University
Glassboro, NJ USA

Abstract: With the proliferation of credit card security crises in the 21st century, Congressional actions and debates are likely to increasingly focus on cyber-safety and -security. This study applied the three-phase crisis model (pre-crisis preparedness, during-crisis management, and post-crisis response) to policy debates and emerging legislation relative to major credit card crises. Qualitative analysis methods explored Congressional debates over credit card security, in the context of real-time connections between crisis and public policy development from C-SPAN digital archives. There were 97 bill proposals and afferent Congressional debates between 1992-2015 that included references to “credit card” and “security.” Policymakers predominantly formulated their arguments around (1) past crises foreshadowing future ones, (2) hackers posing a major threat to national security, and (3) assigning responsibility for preventing and fixing credit card security problems. Public policy was most often proposed in reactive terms and discussed in the aftermath of a crisis, as opposed to a sustained focus on crisis prevention and preparedness.

Quand la crise devient une mesure politique : La crise sur la sécurité des cartes de crédits et les discours du Congrès : Abrégé : Avec la prolifération des crises sur la sécurité des cartes de crédits au 21ème siècle, les actions et les débats du Congrès vont probablement se concentrer de plus en plus sur la sécurité sur Internet. Cette étude est appliqué sur le modèle de crise à trois étapes (l'état de préparation avant la crise, la gestion pendant la crise, et la réponse après la crise) aux débats de politique et à la législation émergente en relation aux grandes crises des cartes de crédits. Les modalités d'analyses qualitatives ont exploré les débats au Congrès sur la s&eac ute;curité des cartes de crédits dans le contexte des rapports en temps réel entre les crises et le développement d'une politique publique des archives digitales de C-SPAN. Il y avait 97 propositions sur des projets de loi qui ont été proposées ainsi que sur des débats afférents du Congrès entre 1992 et 2015 qui avaient des références sur "des cartes de crédit" et sur "la sécurité". Les législateurs ont principalement formulé leurs débats autour des (1) crises passées qui préfigurent des crises futures, (2) les pirates informatiques qui posent une menace considérable pour la sécurité nationale, et (3) l'attribution des responsabilités pour empêcher et réparer les problèmes de sécurité des cartes de crédits. La politique était plus souvent proposer en terme réactif et discutait des conséquences d'une crise, plutôt que de se concentré sur la prévention et la préparation d'une crise.


Organizations in Hiding: Appropriateness, Effectiveness, and Motivations for Concealment

Surabhi Sahay
Maria Dwyer
Craig R. Scott
Punit Dadlani
Erin McKinley

Rutgers University
New Brunswick, NJ, USA

Abstract: Organizational scholarship has rarely considered various hidden organizations in our society. Thus, little is known about how organizations and their members conceal their identity from others and how outsiders might evaluate the appropriateness of, effectiveness of, and motivations for organizational concealment. Our study reports survey data assessing 14 different hidden organizations and their perceived concealment efforts. Additionally, we examine the appropriateness of three motivations for concealment and three attitudes related to concealment. Results suggest similarities and differences in the effectiveness and appropriateness of concealment efforts by various organizations. Additionally, perceived motivations for concealment explain concealment efforts for some types of organizations, but not others. We draw several conclusions from our findings, discuss scholarly and practical implications of this research, and suggest directions f or future scholarship related to organizational concealment.

Les organisations qui se cachent : La pertinence, l'efficacité, et les motivations pour la dissimulation : Abrégé : La bourse d'étude organisationnelle a rarement considéré les différentes organisations dissimulées dans notre société. Ainsi, très peu est connu sur la façon dont les organisations et leurs membres cachent leurs identités des autres et comment quelqu'un de l'extérieur peut évaluer la pertinence, l'efficacité, et les motivations pour la dissimulation organisationnelle. Notre étude offre un compte rendu sur une enquête de données qui évalue 14 organisations différentes cachées et leurs efforts de dissimulation. De plus, nous examinons la pertinence de trois motivations pour la dissimulation et trois attitudes en relation à la dissimulation. Les résultats suggèrent des similitudes et des différences dan s l'efficacité et la pertinence des efforts de dissimulation dans des organisations variées. De plus, les motivations perçues pour la dissimulation expliquent les efforts de dissimulation pour certains types d'organisations, mais pas pour d'autres. Nous tirons plusieurs conclusions de nos découvertes, nous discutons des implications pratiques et utiles de cette recherche, et nous suggérons des directions pour les bourses d'études futures en relation à la dissimulation organisationnelle.

 


Copyright 2017 Communication Institute for Online Scholarship, Inc.

This file may not be publicly distributed or reproduced without written permission of
the Communication Institute for Online Scholarship,
P.O. Box 57, Rotterdam Jct., NY 12150 USA (phone: 518-887-2443).