Communication Institute for Online Scholarship
Communication Institute for Online
Scholarship Continous online service and innovation
since 1986
Site index
 
ComAbstracts Visual Communication Concept Explorer Tables of Contents Electronic Journal of Communication ComVista

EJC 29(1 & 2): Image is the New Text: The Rise of Digital Visuals in Communication
Electronic Journal of Communication

Volume 29 Numbers 1 & 2, 2019

Image is the New Text:
The Rise of Digital Visuals in Communication /
L’image est le nouveau texte :
l’ascension des visuels digitaux en communication

With Editor / Avec éditrice  :

Terri Towner
Oakland University
Rochester, MI, USA


Editor's Introduction: Image is the New Text: The Rise of Digital Visuals in Communication L’introduction de l'éditrice : L’image est le nouveau texte: l’ascension des visuels digitaux en communication

Terri Towner
Oakland University
Rochester, MI, USA

Watch that #NastyWoman Shimmy: Memes, Public Perception, and Affective Publics during the 2016 US Presidential Debates / Regarder le shimmy de #NastyWoman : Des mèmes, la perception publique, et le publique affectif pendant les débats de l’élection présidentielle américaine en 2016

Amber Davisson
Keene State College
Keene, NH, USA

Ashley Hinck
Xavier University
Cincinnati, OH, USA

Humorous Political Images in the 2016 U.S. Presidential Campaign / Les images politiques amusantes de la campagne présidentielle américaine en 2016

Todd L. Belt
The George Washington University
Washington, DC, USA

Visual Depiction of Class in Digital Spaces: An Examination of a Photo Series on Macomb County in Humans of New York / Le portrait visuel de classe dans les espaces digitaux : Un examen d’une série de photos dans le département de Macomb dans les Humans of New York

Newly Paul
University of North Texas
Denton, TX, USA

Visuals Power Participation: Social Media and the 2016 U.S. Presidential Campaign / Les participations des pouvoirs visuels : Les médias sociaux et la campagne présidentielle américaine de 2016

Terri Towner
Oakland University
Rochester, MI, USA

Dissecting the Root of Vaccine Misinformation on Pinterest: A Content Analysis of Vaccine-Related Pins by Influential Social Media Accounts / Disséqué la racine de la désinformation des vaccins sur Pinterest : Une analyse du contenu des pins en relation aux vaccins par les comptes de médias sociaux influent

Jeanine P.D. Guidry
Virginia Commonwealth University
Richmond, VA, USA

Sungsu Kim
Michael Cacciatore
Yan Jin
University of Georgia Athens, GA, USA

Marcus Messner
Virginia Commonwealth University
Richmond, VA, USA

Indie Dyers, Instagram, and the Visual Persona / Les teinturiers indépendants, Instagram, et l'image visuel

Erin F. Doss
Indiana University
Kokomo, IN, USA

Uses and Gratifications of the Screenshot in Human Communication: An Exploratory Study / Les utilisations et les gratifications de la capture d’écran dans la communication humaine : une étude exploratoire

Emily M. Cramer
Howard University
Washington, DC, USA

Yoonmo Sang
University of Canberra
Bruce, ACT, Australia

Sunyoung Park
California Lutheran University
Thousand Oaks, CA, USA


Editor's Introduction:
Image is the New Text:
The Rise of Digital Visuals in Communication

Terri Towner
Oakland University
Rochester, MI, USA

Citizens’ communication behavior is constantly changing. One of the most recent shifts involves a move away from textual communication to communicating with digital images.  Digital images, in the form of pictures, GIFs, infographics, memes, and videos, have experienced rapid growth, flooding citizens’ smartphones, iPads, laptops, and other digital devices. Considering Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, SnapChat, Pinterest, and more, citizens are sharing an estimated 1.8 billion digital photos each day (Meeker, 2014) and 500 hours of video are uploaded on YouTube per minute (Jhonsa, 2018). On social media, visual content is 40 times more likely to be shared than any other content (Hubspot, 2018). Much of the communication literature examines photographs, text, and television, overlooking the role of digital visuals created, posted, and shared on online platforms. To address this gap, the seven articles in this special issue take a much-needed look at the rising importance of digital images in political campaigning, marketing, and communication, as citizens across the globe transition from a textual communication landscape to a visual one. The authors employ a range of methodologies and examine digital images posted on Facebook as well as two understudied visual platforms: Instagram and Pinterest.

This special issue begins with an examination of visuals generated during the historic 2016 U.S. presidential election, specifically how the presidential candidates were portrayed in user-generated memes, GIFs, and digital photos. Amber Davisson and Ashley Hinck’s “Watch that #NastyWoman Shimmy: Memes, Public Perception, and Affective Publics during the 2016 US Presidential Debates” examines how two widely shared visuals of Hillary Clinton re-defined the political meme-landscape. The authors argue that a popular GIF of Clinton’s mid-debate inhale, exhale, smile, and shoulder shimmy as well as the memes of Donald Trump’s reference to Clinton as a “nasty woman” distilled and amplified debate moments. That is, these GIFs and memes become the focus of the debates, as they were shared, re-shared, and covered by the mainstream press, perhaps influencing voter perceptions. The examination of campaign memes and static images continues in Todd Belt’s “Humorous Political Images in the 2016 Presidential Campaign.” The author’s content analysis of funny photos and memes posted and shared on social media reveals that candidate images lacked substantive policy issues, emphasized gendered stereotypes and are largely sexist in nature. It is concluded that this is no laughing matter, as these humorous images add little to the democratic discourse. Newly Paul’s case study “Visual Depiction of Class in Digital Spaces: An Examination of a Photo Series on Macomb County in Humans of New York,” considers how photos posted on social media visually framed one working-class community in Michigan, following the 2016 U.S. presidential election. The author argues that social media sites are an important alternative outlet for citizen journalism, offering new and different perspectives that are disregarded by the traditional press. Concluding the essays on the 2016 election, Terri Towner’s “Visuals Power Participation: Social Media and the 2016 U.S. Presidential Campaign” offers evidence that specific digital campaign images can mobilize voters. The author finds that citizens’ attention to videos posted on social media positively predicted online political participation more so than posted textual content.

Digital images are used for more than just marketing candidates and informing potential voters. Jeanine Guidry and co-authors’ manuscript “Dissecting the Root of Vaccine Misinformation on Pinterest: A Content Analysis of Vaccine-Related Pins by Influential Social Media Accounts” examine vaccine-related messages “pinned” by anti-vaccination organizations and physicians on Pinterest. A systematic content analysis reveals that Pinterest users are more likely to engage with pins including more anti-vaccination information. Erin Doss’ “Indie Dyers, Instagram, and the Visual Persona” case study of yarn dyers demonstrates that business owners, artists, marketers, or companies can develop a successful “visual persona” by posting Instagram images that evoke an emotional connection, presence, and community presence with online users. Those business owners who create a robust “visual persona” may gain more likes, comments, followers, and product purchases. The essay, “Uses and Gratification of the Screenshot in Human Communication” by Emily Cramer and colleagues, focuses on how college-aged students use screenshots in their daily life as well as their motivations for taking screenshots.  The authors conclude that screenshots are predominantly used for communicating with others, with a majority of young adults taking a screenshot on their mobile device and sending the screenshot to someone else. Digital natives, especially Generation Z (18-21 years old), are eschewing text and going visual with screenshots. In sum, the new language is a visual language.

I want to thank the authors for contributing their important research to this special issue. I am also grateful to the reviewers for providing their valuable feedback and constructive comments.

References

Hubspot. (1 February 2018). The ultimate list of marketing statistics. Retrieved from https://www.hubspot.com/marketing-statistics

Jhonsa, E. (12 May 2018). How much could Google’s YouTube be worth? Try more than $100 billion. Retrieved from https://www.thestreet.com/investing/youtube-might-be-worth-over-100-billion-14586599

Meeker, M. (30 May 2018). Internet trends in 2018. Retrieved from https://www.kleinerperkins.com/perspectives/internet-trends-report-2018/


L’introduction de l'éditrice :
L’image est le nouveau texte :
l’ascension des visuels digitaux en communication

Terri Towner
Oakland University
Rochester, MI, USA

Le comportement communicatif des gens change constamment. Un des plus récent changement implique un départ de communication textuelle à une communication par des images digitales. Les images digitales, sous des formes d’images, des GIFs, des infographies, des mèmes, et des vidéos ont fait l’expérience d’une croissance rapide inondant les téléphones portables des gens, des iPads, des portables, et d’autres appareils digitaux. Étant donné Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, SnapChat, Pinterest, et d’autres, les gens partagent à peu près 1.8 milliards de photos digitales chaque jours (Meeker, 2014) et 500 heures de vidéo sont télécharger sur YouTube chaque minute (Jhonsa, 2018). Sur le média social, le contenu visuel est 40 fois plus probable d’être partagé que d’aucun autre contenu (Hubspot, 2018). Beaucoup dans la littérature communicative examine les photographies, le texte, et la télévision, tout en négligeant le rôle des visuels digitaux créés, publiés, et partagés sur des plateformes en lignes. Afin d’adresser cette lacune, les sept articles de cette édition spéciale prennent un regard bien mérité sur l’importance croissante des images digitales dans les campagnes électorales, dans le marketing, et dans la communication puisque les gens à travers le monde passent d’une communication textuelle à une qui est visuel. Les auteurs utilisent des méthodologies différentes et examinent les images digitales publiées sur Facebook ainsi que celles de deux plateformes visuelles qui ne sont pas assez étudiées: Instagram et Pinterest.

Cette édition spéciale commence par un examen des visuels générés pendant l’élection présidentielle américaine historique en 2016, et en particulier comment les candidats présidentiels étaient dépeints par les utilisateurs, les GIFs, et les photos digitales. L’article d’Amber Davisson et d’Ashley Hinck ‘Regarder le shimmy de #NastyWoman : Des mèmes, la perception publique, et le publique affectif pendant les débats de l’élection présidentielle américaine en 2016’ examine comment deux éléments visuels largement partagés sur Hillary Clinton ont redéfini le paysage politique du mème. Les auteurs avancent qu’un GIF populaire pendant le milieu du débat de référence du mème d’inspirer et d’expirer, d’assumer le shimmy aussi bien que la référence mème de Donald Trump sur Clinton comme une ‘femme méchante’ a amplifié plusieurs moments du débat. C’est à dire, ces GIFs et ces mèmes sont devenus le point focal de ces débats, car ils ont été partagés et repartagés, et ont été repris par la presse dominante et ont peut-être influencer la perception des électeurs. L’examen des mèmes de campagne électorale et les images statiques continue dans ‘Les images politique amusantes de la campagne présidentielle américaine en 2016’ de Todd Belt. L’analyse de contenu de l’auteur de photos drôles et de mèmes publiés et partagés sur le média social montre que les images d’un candidat qui ont un certain manque de politique substantielle ont mis l’emphase dans les stéréotypes de genres et sont plutôt sexistes par nature. La conclusion de cette article est que cela n’est pas un thème drôle car ces images drôles offrent très peu dans le discours démocratique. L’étude de Newly Paul, ‘Le portrait visuel de classe dans les espaces digitaux : Un examen d’une série de photos sur le département de Macomb dans les Humans of New York considère comment les photos publiées sur le média social a encadrer une communauté de classe ouvrière au Michigan après l’élection présidentielle américaine de 2016. L’auteur soutient que les sites des médias sociaux sont une alternative importante pour le journalisme du citoyen, en offrant des perspectives nouvelles et différentes qui sont ignorées par la presse traditionnelle. En concluant sur les études de l’élection en 2016, l’article de Terri Towner, ‘Les participations des pouvoirs visuels : Les médias sociaux et la campagne présidentielle américaine de 2016’ offre une évidence que des images de campagnes digitales spécifiques peuvent mobiliser les électeurs. L’auteur trouve que l’attention des électeurs aux vidéos publiées sur le média social prédit de façon positive la participation politique en ligne bien plus que le contenu textuel publié. 

Les images digitales sont utilisées pour plus que simplement faire du marketing pour les candidats et pour informer des électeurs potentiels. Le manuscrit de Jeanine Guidry et de ses coauteurs ‘Disséqué la racine de la désinformation des vaccins sur Pinterest : Une analyse du contenu des pins en relation aux vaccins par les comptes de médias sociaux influent’ examinent les messages associés aux vaccins « épinglés » par les organisations et les médecins anti vaccins sur Pinterest. Une analyse du contenu systématique révèle que les utilisateurs de Pinterest sont plus susceptibles d’être engagés avec des pins en incluant plus d’informations anti vaccins. L’étude d’Erin Doss ‘Les teinturiers indépendants, Instagram, et le personnage visuel’ sur les teinturiers des fils démontre comment les propriétaires d’entreprises, les artistes, les négociants, ou les compagnies peuvent développer ‘un personnage visuel’ en publiant des images de Instagram qui évoquent une connexion émotionnelle, une présence, et une présence de communauté avec les utilisateurs en ligne. Ces propriétaires d’entreprises qui crées ‘un personnage visuel’ peuvent accroître leurs likes, leurs commentaires, leurs fans, et l’achat d’articles. L’essai d’Emily Cramer et de ses collègues ‘Les utilisations et les gratifications de la capture d’écran dans la communication humaine: une étude exploratoire’ a comme objectif de savoir comment les étudiants d’âge universitaire utilisent la capture d’écran dans leurs vies quotidiennes et cherche aussi à découvrir leurs motivations pour prendre des captures d’écrans. Les auteurs concluent que les captures d’écrans sont utilisées de façon prédominante pour communiquer avec d’autres gens, avec une majorité de jeunes adultes qui prennent des captures d’écrans sur leurs appareils portables et qui envoient leurs captures d’écrans à quelqu’un d’autre. Les natifs du digital, en particulier les membres de la génération Z (18 à 21 ans), évitent les textes et vont vers le visuel avec les captures d’écrans. En sommaire, le nouveau langage est le langage visuel. 

Je souhaite remercier les auteurs pour avoir contribué leurs recherches importantes pour cette édition spéciale. Je suis aussi très reconnaissante pour les examinateurs qui ont offert leurs commentaires précieux et constructifs. 

Les ouvrages cités:

Hubspot. (1 February 2018). The ultimate list of marketing statistics. Retrieved from https://www.hubspot.com/marketing-statistics

Jhonsa, E. (12 May 2018). How much could Google’s YouTube be worth? Try more than $100 billion. Retrieved from https://www.thestreet.com/investing/youtube-might-be-worth-over-100-billion-14586599

Meeker, M. (30 May 2018). Internet trends in 2018. Retrieved from https://www.kleinerperkins.com/perspectives/internet-trends-report-2018/


Watch that #NastyWoman Shimmy:
Memes, Public Perception, and Affective Publics during the 2016 US Presidential Debates

Amber Davisson
Keene State College
Keene, NH, USA

Ashley Hinck
Xavier University
Cincinnati, OH, USA

Abstract: While news media has traditionally shaped how voters perceive presidential debates, user-created digital visuals like memes are increasingly framing the presidential debates, public perceptions, and the election. We examine one way in which memes do this: by shaping and circulating affect. Drawing on perspectives from rhetoric, political communication, and political science, we examine two memes that emerged from Hillary Clinton’s performance in the 2016 U.S. presidential debates: the Hillary Shimmy and the Nasty Woman memes. We argue that the Hillary Shimmy and the Nasty Woman memes framed the election by distilling a complex media event into a single moment, amplifying the affect of that particular moment, and transforming the power structures inherent in constructed campaign performances. Last, we conclude by examining how these digital visuals are shaping a new political context.

Regarder le shimmy de #NastyWoman: Des mèmes, la perception publique, et le publique affectif pendant les débats de l’élection présidentielle américaine en 2016  : Abrégé : Bien que les médias ont traditionnellement formé comment les électeurs perçoivent les débats présidentiels, les visuelles digitales qui sont créés par les utilisateurs comme les mèmes encadrent de plus en plus les débats présidentiels, les perceptions publiques, et l’élection. Nous examinons une façon dans laquelle les mèmes font cela: en façonnant et en circulant un affect. En ce basant sur des perspectives de la rhétorique, de la communication politique, et des sciences politiques, nous examinons deux mèmes qui ont émergés de la performance de Hillary Clinton pendant les débats présidentiels américains en 2016: les mèmes de Hillary Shimmy et de Nasty Woman. Nous affirmons que les mèmes de Hillary Shimmy et de Nasty Woman ont encadré l’élection en distillant un événement médiatique complexe en un seul moment, en amplifiant d’effet de ce moment particulier, et en transformant les structures du pouvoir inhérent dans les performances des campagnes politiques construites. Finalement, nous concluons en examinant comment ces visuels digitaux façonnent le nouveau contexte politique.


Humorous Political Images in the 2016 U.S. Presidential Campaign

Todd L. Belt
The George Washington University
Washington, DC, USA

Abstract: This paper examines the information environment created by the growing phenomenon of the use of humorous still images and memes as political expression through social media. Through a content analysis of a sample of 500 images culled from social media platforms during the 2016 U.S. presidential campaign, this study describes the quality of discourse available to voters and tests several hypotheses regarding expected content. The results demonstrate that the information environment created by these images is low on issue breadth and depth. Social media is by no means a panacea for enriching the amount of information available to voters. Instead, it serves to bring out individuals’ worst sexist and image-oriented tendencies, contributing little to informing the electorate.

Les images politiques amusantes de la campagne présidentielle américaine en 2016  : Abrégé : Cette étude examine l’environnement de l’information créé par ce phénomène en pleine croissance au sujet de l’utilisation d'images statiques amusantes et de mèmes comme expressions politiques par le média social. À travers une analyse de fond à partir d’un échantillon de 500 images prisent de plate-formes médiatiques sociales pendant la campagne présidentielle américaine en 2016, cette étude décrit la qualité des échanges disponibles aux électeurs et évalue plusieurs hypothèses qui se consacrent sur le contenu prévu. Les résultats démontrent que l’environnement de l’information créé par ces images est bas sur le problème autant en ampleur qu’en profondeur. Le média social est en aucun cas une panacée pour enrichir la quantité d’information disponible aux électeurs. En fait, il sert à faire ressortir les pires tendances sexistes des gens avec leurs orientations imagées, en offrant très peu d’informations à l’électorat.


Visual Depiction of Class in Digital Spaces:
An Examination of a Photo Series on Macomb County in
Humans of New York

Newly Paul
University of North Texas
Denton, TX, USA

Abstract: News and entertainment media are often criticized for their negative and stereotypical portrayals of working- and lower-class people. Visuals in the mainstream press often portray blue-collar workers as undeserving of sympathy, criminal-minded, and ignorant. This paper examines whether the visuals in citizen journalism sites provide a contrast to the mainstream narrative about class issues. A series of photographs on Macomb County, Michigan, published in the citizen journalism site Humans of New York, is examined immediately after the November 2016 U.S. presidential elections. Using visual framing theory and textual analysis, photographs and accompanying quotes from residents of the largely blue-collar county that was instrumental in turning the vote in Michigan in favor of the Republican Party were analyzed. Findings indicate that the photo series showcases a county that is staunchly working class, and the pictures largely replicated the homogenized imagery of the working class propagated by mainstream media. The accompanying quotes, however, added more depth and perspective to the photographs and demonstrated that the area is populated by people who are diverse with respect to age, political and social beliefs, family structures, employment status, and life experiences.

Le portrait visuel de classe dans les espaces digitaux: Un examen d’une série de photos dans le département de Macomb dans les Humans of New York  : Abrégé :  Les informations et le média du spectacle sont souvent critiqués pour les portraits négatifs et stéréotypés des classes ouvrières et des classes populaires. Les images dans la presse populaire représentent souvent les classes ouvrières comme étant peu méritantes de compassion, d’un esprit criminel, et ignorant. Cette étude examine si les images de la presse dans les sites de journalisme du citoyen offrent un contraste au discours qui dominent sur les problèmes de classe. Une série de photographies sur le département de Macomb au Michigan publiée dans le site de journalisme du citoyen Humans of New York sont immédiatement examinées après les élections présidentielles américaines de novembre 2016. En utilisant la théorie de l’encadrement visuel et de l’analyse textuelle, des photographies et leurs citations des riverains d’un département composé principalement d’une classe ouvrière qui a joué un rôle important au Michigan, où il a retourné le vote qui est devenu favorable au parti républicain, ont été analysés. Les conclusions indiquent que la série de photographies présente un département qui est résolument de classe ouvrière, et que les images ont répliqué fidèlement l’imagerie homogène d’une classe ouvrière propagée par le média traditionnel. Les citations qui accompagnaient les photographies, par contre, ont offert beaucoup plus de substance et de perspectives et ont démontré que le lieu est peuplé de gens qui sont divers en ce qui concerne leurs âges, leurs croyances sociales et politiques, leurs structures familiales, leurs statuts d’emploi, et leurs expériences de la vie.


Visuals Power Participation:
Social Media and the 2016 U.S. Presidential Campaign

Terri Towner
Oakland University
Rochester, MI, USA

Abstract: Political campaigns across the globe have engaged in a plethora of visual marketing, employing Facebook and Twitter, along with newer forms of social media, such as SnapChat, Instagram, Pinterest, and Flickr. During the 2016 U.S. presidential campaign, a variety of visual campaign content was created and shared on social media by candidates, campaigns, the national political parties, the mainstream press, advocacy groups, celebrities, citizens, and more. It is unclear, however, how visual content posted on these sites influenced political attitudes and behaviors. This research argues that photos, infographics, and videos about the presidential campaign posted on social networking sites predict offline and online political participation because visual-based content is more stimulating, persuasive, and memorable than text. To test the latter claim, a national survey of adults was conducted during the 2016 U.S. presidential primary and general election periods. Findings offer some evidence that attention to photos, infographics, and video about the campaign on social networks more significantly predict political participation than attention to textual content posted on social media. This study suggests that visuals on social media matter more than textual content during a political campaign.

Les participations des pouvoirs visuels: Les médias sociaux et la campagne présidentielle américaine de 2016  : Abrégé : Les campagnes politiques à travers le globe se sont engagées dans maintes marketing visuels, employant Facebook et Twitter, de même que de nouveaux médias sociaux, comme SnapChat, Instagram, Pinterest, et Flickr. Pendant la campagne présidentielle américaine de 2016, une variété de contenu de campagne visuel a été créée et partagée sur des réseaux sociaux médiatiques par les candidats, les campagnes, les partis politiques nationaux, les médias traditionnels, les vedettes, les citoyens, et plus. Ce qui n'est pas clair, par contre, est la façon dont le contenu visuel qui est affiché sur ces sites ont influencé les attitudes et les comportements politiques. Cette recherche soutient que les photos, les infographies, et les vidéos au sujet de la campagne présidentielle affichées sur des réseaux sociaux prédisent hors ligne et en ligne la participation politique parce que le contenu aux méthodes visuelles est plus stimulant, persuasif, et mémorable qu'un texte. Afin de tester ce dernier argument, une enquête nationale auprès d'adultes a été menée pendant l'élection présidentielle de 2016 lors du primaire et de l'élection générale. Les résultats nous offrent quelques preuves que l’attention sur les photos, les infographies, et les vidéos au sujet de la campagne sur les réseaux sociaux prédisent plus la participation politique que le point sur le contenu de texte affiché sur un réseau social. Cette étude suggère que les visuels des médias sociaux importent plus que le contenu textuel d’une campagne politique.


Dissecting the Root of Vaccine Misinformation on Pinterest:
A Content Analysis of Vaccine-Related Pins by Influential Social Media Accounts

Jeanine P.D. Guidry
Virginia Commonwealth University
Richmond, VA, USA

Sungsu Kim
Michael Cacciatore
Yan Jin
University of Georgia
Athens, GA, USA

Marcus Messner
Virginia Commonwealth University
Richmond, VA, USA

Abstract: Given the role the Internet plays in communicating anti-vaccine sentiments, coupled with limited research in this area, this study focused on the social media platform Pinterest, analyzing 1,119 vaccine-related pins posted by six anti-vaccine entities through a quantitative content analysis. Findings reveal that anti-vaccine organizations primarily posted about the flu, MMR, and HPV vaccines, with the anti-MMR and anti-flu vaccine posts eliciting significantly more online engagement. In addition, fear images are present in most pins, as are discussions about the adverse effects of vaccines. Health educators and public health organizations should be aware of these dynamics since these findings can be used to craft more effective vaccine uptake campaigns.

Disséqué la racine de la désinformation des vaccins sur Pinterest:  Une analyse du contenu des pins en relation aux vaccins par les comptes de médias sociaux influent : Abrégé : En tenant compte du rôle que l’internet joue en communiquant des opinions anti-vaccins, liés aux recherches limitées dans ce sujet, cette étude est axée sur la plate-forme médiatique social de Pinterest, pour analyser 1119 pins reliés aux vaccins affichés par six entités anti-vaccins à travers une analyse quantitative de fond. Les conclusions ont révélé que les organisations anti-vaccins publiaient principalement sur la grippe, le vaccin ROR, et le vaccin HPV, avec des messages anti-ROR et contre les vaccins contre la grippe ont suscité bien plus d’engagements en ligne. De plus, des images qui font peurs sont présentes dans la plupart des pins, ainsi que dans des discussions sur les effets adverses des vaccins. Les éducateurs de santé et les organisations de santé publique doivent être au courant de ces dynamiques parce que ces conclusions peuvent être utilisées afin d’avoir une prise de campagne de vaccination plus efficace.


Indie Dyers, Instagram, and the Visual Persona

Erin F. Doss
Indiana University
Kokomo, IN, USA

Abstract: Traditional rhetorical persona theory has been solely used to analyze and describe text-based communication such as speeches, articles, or books. I argue, however, that persona theory can also be applied to the visual, as images can also convey a rhetor’s persona, identify with audiences, and create persuasion. Through a case study using the Instagram feeds of independent yarn dyers, I demonstrate how a visual persona functions to create an emotional connection with audiences, develop a sense of presence within the rhetor’s feed, and build a sense of community through engagement and collaboration.

Les teinturiers indépendants, Instagram, et l'image visuel  : Abrégé : La théorie traditionnelle du personnage rhétorique a été seulement utilisé à analysé et à décrire des communications basé sur des textes tels que des discours, des articles, ou des livres. J’affirme que, cependant, la théorie du personnage peut aussi s’appliquer au visuel, du fait que les images peuvent aussi transmettre la rhétorique du personnage, de s’identifier avec les audiences, et de créer une persuasion. À travers une étude de cas en utilisant les diffusions d’Instagram sur les teinturiers de laine indépendante, je démontre comment un personnage visuel fonctionne pour créer une connexion émotionnelle avec ses audiences, développe une sensation de présence dans la diffusion du rhétorique, et construit un sentiment de communauté à travers l’engagement et la collaboration. 


Uses and Gratifications of the Screenshot in Human Communication:
An Exploratory Study

Emily M. Cramer
Howard University
Washington, DC, USA

Yoonmo Sang
University of Canberra
Bruce, ACT, Australia

Sunyoung Park
California Lutheran University
Thousand Oaks, CA, USA

Abstract: A screenshot is a digital image of content appearing on a device’s screen that can be cropped, filtered, retouched, edited, posted, and/or sent to someone else. Anecdotal evidence tells us that screenshots are integrated into our lives, but formalized research has yet to uncover the “how and why” of screenshot use. Drawing from a uses and gratification framework, this exploratory study examines the technicity and practice as well as motivations and gratifications of screenshot use in general and across age groups. A sample of predominately college-age students responded to an electronic survey inquiring about screenshot use (e.g. devices used to take screenshots, device preference for taking screenshots, and frequency of screenshot use) as well as motivations for taking screenshots. Results revealed that screenshots: are social, reflect a range of diverse and age-related content, occur often and on the go, and accommodate needs especially in emerging adulthood. Taking a first step in bridging the gap in screenshot literature, implications and future directions of this nascent work are discussed.

Les utilisations et les gratifications de la capture d’écran dans la communication humaine: une étude exploratoire  : Abrégé : Une capture d’écran est une image digitale dont le contenu apparaît sur l’écran d’un appareil électronique qui peut être retaillé (pris), filtré, retouché, édité, affiché, et/ou bien envoyé à quelqu’un d’autre. L’évidence anecdotique nous dit que les captures d’écrans sont intégrés dans nos vies, mais la recherche formelle n’a pas encore découvert le “comment et le pourquoi” de l’utilisation des captures d’écrans. En ce basant sur des structures d’utilisations et de gratifications, cette étude exploratoire examine la technicité et la pratique ainsi que les motivations et les satisfactions de l’utilisation de la capture d’écran en général et à travers des groupes d’âges. Un échantillon d’étudiants principalement d’âge universitaire qui ont répondu à un sondage électronique qui demandait quelle utilisation pour la capture d’écran était faite (par ex. quels appareils électroniques ont été utilisés pour prendre les captures d’écrans, quel appareil préféré a été utilisé pour prendre les captures d’écrans, et la fréquence de l’utilisation de la capture d’écran) ainsi que les motivations pour prendre les captures d’écrans. Les résultats ont révélé que les captures d’écrans sont sociales, reflètent une variété d’un contenu divers et sont en relation à l’âge. Ils révèlent aussi qu’ils se présentent souvent et qu’ils bougent, et qu’ils s’adaptent aux besoins des jeunes qui entrent dans le monde adulte. En prenant un premier pas afin de minimiser la lacune qui existe dans la littérature de la capture d’écran, des implications et des directions futures dans cette étude naissante sont discutées.


Copyright 2019 Communication Institute for Online Scholarship, Inc.

This file may not be publicly distributed or reproduced without written permission of
the Communication Institute for Online Scholarship,
P.O. Box 57, Rotterdam Jct., NY 12150 USA (phone: 518-887-2443).